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'Corrupt Agriculture Projects in Blue Nile' - Memorandum - AllAfrica.com

'Corrupt Agriculture Projects in Blue Nile' - Memorandum - AllAfrica.com | Agriculture | Scoop.it
The native administration of Sudan's Blue Nile state razed a memorandum to the Presidency of the Republic about corruption in the agricultural projects.
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Futureproofing farming: Looking ahead to 2030 - Global Landscapes Forum

Futureproofing farming: Looking ahead to 2030 - Global Landscapes Forum | Agriculture | Scoop.it


Agriculture may have been overlooked at the recent UN climate talks in Warsaw, but the world’s farmers are not ready to stand down. Drawing on the momentum built at the Global Landscapes Forum and the unity with which the agriculture community now speaks – attention could now shift to another UN process that could allow agriculture to contribute to future sustainable development challenges ahead.

Next week in New York, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are set to be discussed, which will replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) when they expire in 2015.

Turning this post 2015 development agenda on its head – global agriculture coalition Farming First have produced an infographic that looks ahead to 2030, when these SDGs are expected to expire to pose the question: Where are we heading, and what must we do now to prepare for it?

The infographic compiles the most expert global estimates, forecasts and trends with alarming results. For example, by 2030, energy demand could rise 50%, with the demand for biofuel crops increasing as much as five times over.

However it is not just challenges in store, but also opportunities. Agriculture’s carbon mitigation potential could reach as much as 7.5% of total global emissions, if certain productivity measures are adopted and carbon is priced above $50.

By highlighting these 2030 projections, the infographic encourages decision-makers to focus on the end goals that the post-2015 agenda should be designed to address and how agriculture, can play a important role to help achieve them.

Take a look at the full infographic at www.farmingfirst.org/post2015. Share the key statistics and join us in asking policy makers to keep this future picture in mind when shaping the Sustainable Development Goals.

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Lima COP20 |CMP10 -- UN Climate Change Conference 2014 | Young Professionals for Agriculture Development (YPARD)

Lima COP20 |CMP10 -- UN Climate Change Conference 2014 | Young Professionals for Agriculture Development (YPARD) | Agriculture | Scoop.it
Date:Start in 01 Dec 2014
End in 12 Dec 2014Location:Lima, Peru

The 20th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 20) and the 10th session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 10) will be hosted by the Government of Peru.

Get involved
Become a YPARD member!

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In a Farmer’s Shoes: Professional Farming - Leading By Example
Emmanuel Ngore holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Science at the Kenyatta University. Besides, he is a Programme Officer at United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and YPARD Kenya representative. Emmanuel has worked with the youth for 6 years on subject matters pertaining to conservation of natural resources, policymaking, and diseases prevention.
Upcoming Events
17 Jul 2016 - 22 Jul 2016 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan,
The Xth International Rangeland Congress (IRC)
13 Nov 2015 - 15 Nov 2015 in Chamber of Architects of Turkey, Istanbul,
CUI '14 Contemporary Urban Issues Conference on Informality
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FAO Launches New Training Materials on Climate, Gender and Food Security for Agricultural Development Professionals | UNCC:LEARN

FAO Launches New Training Materials on Climate, Gender and Food Security for Agricultural Development Professionals | UNCC:LEARN | Agriculture | Scoop.it


The roles, responsibilities and capabilities of both men and women need to be well understood to ensure effective adaptation to climate change, mitigation and food security. To support researching and catalyzing gender-sensitive, climate-smart agricultural practices, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) launched a training guide titled Gender and Climate Change Research in Agriculture and Food Security for Rural Development. The manual has been developed in collaboration with The CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS) and has been tested in Bangladesh, Uganda, and Ghana.

The manual sets out to provide agricultural development professionals with resources and participatory action research tools for collecting, analyzing and sharing gender-sensitive information about agricultural communities, households and individuals who are facing climate changes. This will for instance sensitize users to the links of socio-economic and gender issues in the context of climate change in the agriculture and food security sectors.

Participatory approaches, sampling strategies, reporting and analysis approaches are provided. The guide also applies knowledge gained beyond research to promote gender-sensitive adaptation and mitigation activities in agriculture. It includes modules that can be added and modified according to future research teams’ study objectives and questions.

For further information please contact micca@fao.org or visit: http://www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/gender/en/.

Gender and Climate Change Research in Agriculture and Food Security for Rural Development: http://www.fao.org/docrep/015/md280e/md280e.pdf.

Blog: Getting to the heart of gender issues in climate change and food security research from the researchers who produced and tested the manuals in the field.

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Sustainable Innovation Forum Speakers - Cop20 Lima

Sustainable Innovation Forum Speakers - Cop20 Lima | Agriculture | Scoop.it

Ms. Semedo, is DeputyDirector General, Natural Resources of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and has been working for FAO in various positions since 2003. Under her current role she coordinates the work of 3 departments (Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry) and two natural resources divisions.


A national of Cape-Verde, Ms Semedo former positions has included Minister for Fisheries, Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Minister for Marine Affairs, Minister for Tourism, Transportation and Marine Affairs. She has also served as Coordinator of the Permanent Interstate Committee for Drought Control in Sahel (CILSS), as Chairperson of the Ministerial Conference on Fisheries Cooperation among African States bordering the Atlantic Ocean and as Chairperson of the Ministerial Conference on Fisheries Cooperation among African States bordering the Atlantic Ocean.
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UN-REDD COP20 side event moderated by Helen Clark

UN-REDD COP20 side event moderated by Helen Clark | Agriculture | Scoop.it


The event will take place at 6:30-8:00pm in the Machu Picchu room and will be moderated by Helen Clark, Administrator for the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Chair of the United Nations Development Group.


Support for Forests as a climate change mitigation tool has expanded significantly following the development of the Warsaw Framework for REDD+ at UNFCCC COP19 and the endorsement of the New York Declaration on Forests by dozens of world leaders at the September 2014 Climate Summit. Fifty-six developing nations have now joined the UN-REDD Programme (a collaboration of UNDP, UNEP and FAO), signalling an increase in demand for REDD+ support. REDD+ is now recognized as a catalyst to sustainable development. In response to this momentum and to meet the advancing needs of developing countries to align with the progression of REDD+, the UN-REDD Programme is developing a strengthened 2016-2020 strategy.


Within this context, Clark will deliver a keynote speech before moderating a panel of key REDD+ experts including Achim Steiner, Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme and Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations; H.E. Ephraim Kamuntu, Minister of Water and Environment, Uganda; Mario Boccucci, Head of the UN-REDD Programme Secretariat; and Vicky Tauli Corpus, Secretary-General’s Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Peoples. High-level representatives of Norway’s Ministry of Climate and Environment, and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations will also take part.


The panel dialogue will be followed by several REDD+ developing countries sharing their country’s perspectives, and a Q&A session with audience and panel members.

Register for this event at: http://t.co/nQnUTTv33p

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Agricultural Informatics 2014 International Conference - Future Internet and ICT Innovation in Agriculture, Food and the Environment | YPARD

Agricultural Informatics 2014 International Conference - Future Internet and ICT Innovation in Agriculture, Food and the Environment | YPARD | Agriculture | Scoop.it
Date:Start in 13 Nov 2014
End in 15 Nov 2014Location:University of Debrecen HungaryAims of the Conference

The main objective of the conference is to promote the exchange of experiences among non-profit, research and business professionals, as well as the development of the international relations. The event provides a forum for agriculture involved practical and academic players, to discuss the actual questions of education, research, development and application of Information Technologies in Agriculture and Rural Development with publishing the recent results. The official languages of the conference are English and Hungarian (without translation). The meeting covers a broad range of topics, as follows.

Topics
  • Big data
  • Information systems
  • Bioinformatics
  • Cloud computing and services
  • Collaborative working environment
  • Decision Support Systems, Modelling and simulation
  • Ecological modelling
  • Education/Training programs and development
  • E-learning
  • Food safety and traceability
  • Future Internet in the agri-food sector
  • Information and communication technologies for rural areas
  • Information systems
  • IT and innovation in agri-food sector
  • Mobile technology applications
  • Precision agriculture, GIS, RS
  • Web services, portals and Internet applications
  • Wireless sensor networks
Structure of the ConferenceVideoconference sessions

Type of participation Submissions for *Face-to-Face* or for *Virtual (Videoconference)* Participation are both accepted. Both kinds of submissions will have the same process and the accepted papers will be included in the same proceedings. The videoconference service will be provided by the Hungarian National Information Infrastructure service.

Preliminary program

13/11/2014 Thursday
14.00-18.00 Workshops – Sessions
19:00 Welcome Drink

14/11/2014 Friday
10.00 Opening
10.30 Plenary session
12.30 Lunch
14.00-18.00 Sessions – Workshops – Networking breaks
19:00 Social evening

15/11/2014 Saturday
9:00- 12:00 Sessions – Workshops – Networking breaks – Tours

Timeline

Conference
First day of conference November 13, 2014
Last day of conference November 15, 2014

Website
Go Live (as a Current Conference) July 1, 2014
Move to Conference Archive November 15, 2014

Submissions
Author registration opened July 1, 2014
Author registration closed October 25, 2014
Call for Papers posted July 1, 2014
Submissions accepted from July 1, 2014
Submission deadline October 10, 2014

Registration fees

The registration fee includes:

  • Participation on professional programmes
  • e-Proceedings
  • Social evening meeting

The registration fee does not cover the meal cost. The participation are free for lecture presenter college and university (MSc, BSc) students. Payment by Bank transfer: Account holder: MAGISZ (Magyar Agrárinformatikai Szövetség) Bank account number: 10103173-40622623-00000005 IBAN: HU36 10103173-40622623-00000005

Registration Type Cost

Registration fee (5.000 HUF or 20.00 EUR)
Virtual (Via videoconference) participation with lecture (5.000 HUF or 20.00 EUR)
Registration fee for BSc, MSc students FREE (There is no registration fee)

Conference language

The official languages of the conference are English and Hungarian. The conference paper could be written in English or Hungarian. In case of Hungarian papers an abstract in English also needed.

Publication

Selected papers will be published in the Journal of Agricultural Informatics, other papers in the on-line conference proceedings on the conference website and the HAAI portal.

ContactMiklós HERDON; Chief of Program committee
e-mail: herdon@agr.unideb.hu Tel: +36 52 508360
Róbert SZILÁGYI, Chief of Organising committe
e-mail: szilagyir@agr.unideb.hu Tel: +36 52 508471
Szilvia BOTOS; Secretary
e-mail: botos.szilvia@agr.unideb.hu

 

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Climate-smart agriculture sourcebook

Climate-smart agriculture sourcebook | Agriculture | Scoop.it

Why is climate-smart agriculture needed?


Between now and 2050, the world’s population will increase by one-third. Most of these additional 2 billion people will live in developing countries. At the same time, more people will be living in cities. If current income and consumption growth trends continue, FAO estimates that agricultural production will have to increase by 60 percent by 2050 to satisfy the expected demands for food and feed. Agriculture must therefore transform itself if it is to feed a growing global population and provide the basis for economic growth and poverty reduction. Climate change will make this task more difficult under a business-as-usual scenario, due to adverse impacts on agriculture, requiring spiralling adaptation and related costs.

To achieve food security and agricultural development goals, adaptation to climate change and lower emission intensities per output will be necessary.

This transformation must be accomplished without depletion of the natural resource base. Climate change is already having an impact on agriculture and food security as a result of increased prevalence of extreme events and increased unpredictability of weather patterns. This can lead to reductions in production and lower incomes in vulnerable areas. These changes can also affect global food prices. Developing countries and smallholder farmers and pastoralists in particular are being especially hard hit by these changes. Many of these small-scale producers are already coping with a degraded natural resource base. They often lack knowledge about potential options for adapting their production systems and have limited assets and risk-taking capacity to access and use technologies and financial services.


Enhancing food security while contributing to mitigate climate change and preserving the natural resource base and vital ecosystem services requires the transition to agricultural production systems that are more productive, use inputs more efficiently, have less variability and greater stability in their outputs, and are more resilient to risks, shocks and long-term climate variability. More productive and more resilient agriculture requires a major shift in the way land, water, soil nutrients and genetic resources are managed to ensure that these resources are used more efficiently.

Source: FAO

Read more: http://www.fao.org/docrep/018/i3325e/i3325e.pdf

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IFAD social reporting blog: Building strong partnerships for nutrition and agricultural development

IFAD social reporting blog: Building strong partnerships for nutrition and agricultural development | Agriculture | Scoop.it


Every night, 842 million women, children and men go to bed hungry. Every day 8,000 children die needlessly from conditions linked to under-nutrition. Globally, 2 billion people suffer from micronutrient malnutrition.

These statistics are well known, but they bear repeating. The burden of under-nutrition is incalculable, and the ramifications for children are particularly severe. When a child is deprived of essential nutrients in the womb and during the first two years of life, the resulting damage to physical and mental development can lead to a lifetime of health problems and unrealised potential.

There is not only a moral and social imperative to address under-nutrition, but an economic one. It is estimated that childhood malnutrition will cost the global economy some $125 billion in lost GDP growth by 2030.

It is one of life’s cruel paradoxes that many smallholder farmers, who do so much to help feed their nations, are too often hungry and malnourished. It is estimated that three-quarters of the world’s hungry people live in rural areas. Investing in nutrition through smallholder agriculture is more than a social good. It is sound development policy and good economics.

For years, many in the agricultural sector thought that under-nutrition could be solved by a simple equation: increase agricultural production and incomes, and better nutrition would automatically follow. After all, if you grow more food and earn more money, you can consume more food and nutrients. We now know that income growth alone does not guarantee good nutrition. Despite better yields, higher revenues and greater access to markets, the rates of under-nutrition and micronutrient deficiency remain unacceptably high in many rural regions.

Over the last few decades, we have learned important lessons that have helped us ensure that agriculture – the biggest employer in most of the regions where IFAD works -- contributes to better nutrition. First, there is compelling evidence that women’s education, health, nutritional status and decision-making power have a significant impact on the health and nutritional status of children. Women are the primary care givers in rural households, and when women earn money, they are more likely than men to spend it on food for the family. More than half of the reduction in malnutrition between 1970 and 1995 is attributable to improvements in women’s status and education. Empowering and educating women must be a principal goal of agricultural development.

We put this knowledge to work in Bangladesh, where we partnered with the government and WorldFish to introduce nutrient-dense small fish to poor communities. As part of the project, families were educated on the importance of nutrition, particularly for pregnant women and young mothers. As a result, malnutrition and stunting have been reduced significantly.

Second, we need to address issues of wastage and post-harvest losses so that farmers can make the most from what they grow and reduce the amount of extra food they need to grow. Today, there is no shortage of food globally — the world grows enough. But in sub-Saharan Africa, between 20 and 40 per cent of crop production is lost because of poor processing and storage. We see similar problems in poor rural communities in every region where we work: Asia, Latin America, North Africa and Central and Eastern Europe.

Investing in modern storage facilities means that farmers can keep their produce safe during harvest seasons so that it can be eaten or sold at a later date. We have seen this in Timor-Leste where two-thirds of the population is considered food insecure. More than 60 per cent of the children where we work are chronically undernourished. Low crop productivity has long been a problem in Timor-Leste, but when farmers were first offered high-yield maize seeds, they hesitated. They were already losing 30 per cent of their stored maize every year to pests.

IFAD joined forces with the Timor-Leste Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and the Australian government to provide better storage and better seeds, which we expect will increase food availability by 70 per cent. The secure storage also creates an incentive for farmers to adopt higher yielding varieties and should allow them to wait for the off-season when prices are higher. Secure storage also creates an opportunity for farmers to climb the value ladder, moving into alternative income activities, such as producing food for livestock. As this example shows, low production and waste are two parts of a complex, dynamic equilibrium that locks rural people into cycles of poverty. Such complex problems demand systematic solutions and strong partnerships.

Thirdly, we must ensure that knowledge and science serve agriculture. Scientific advances can improve the nutritional value of what we grow. We have seen innovations such as quality protein maize, which offers 90 per cent of the nutritional value of skimmed milk, or the bio-fortification of key crops to address micronutrient deficiencies — such as vitamin A in sweet potato. These are already making a difference to food and security but more needs to be done to help farmers grow and sell a more diverse range of foods. There are more than 50,000 edible plants in the world, but studies show that rice, maize and wheat provide 60 per cent of the world’s energy intake. Several indigenous crops are known to be more nutritious than the ones we eat today, while fruits and vegetables provide micronutrients that are vital for good health. Through science, we can improve the quality of available food, and through education, we can ensure that this translates into better nutrition.

In order to improve dietary quality for people of all ages in a community, behavioural change is necessary. That means there has to be a convergence of efforts and inclusive partnerships so that people have the nutritional knowledge as well as the resources to satisfy it. On a community level, diversified crops, more nutritious varieties and higher incomes may only amount to better harvests in the barn and money in the bank, not better meals on the table and food in children's stomachs. As we have seen, by taking spectrum of actions and increasing knowledge of care and feeding practices, household diets, and the preparation and storage of food, we can turn mere growth into real gain.

agriculture, bangladesh, nutrition, president, smallholder farmers, timor-leste

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IFAD social reporting blog: Day Three - Building Resilience to Climate Change and Managing Disaster Risks through Sustainable Agriculture

IFAD social reporting blog: Day Three - Building Resilience to Climate Change and Managing Disaster Risks through Sustainable Agriculture | Agriculture | Scoop.it
Climate change, food insecurity and environmental disasters are inextricably linked to one another and strengthening resilience to climate change for farmers and communities is key to sustainability. This was the main message at today’s COP20 side event on Building Resilience to Climate Change and Managing Disaster Risks through Sustainable Agriculture.

This event was co-organized by the World Farmers’ Organisation (WFO), Caritas International, the International Federation for Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).

Farmers and experts from international organizations and civil society, who directly experience the need for climate-resilient agriculture and risk management, presented best practices and proposed solutions to reduce climate change impacts on agriculture and food security. 

“Now that the world has realized the importance of climate change and has developed an increased awareness towards this issue, we must understand where farmers stand, what their role is and how can we help them,” said moderator Adriana Opromolla, from Caritas International

Mr Charles Ogang, President of the WFO in Kampala, said that Uganda has already felt the impacts of climate change in the form of different hazards that are effecting the entire value chain. In response the organization supports and promotes activities such as: fasting mature varieties; avoiding bush burning; managing water on a small scale; supplementing pastures; conserving agriculture; supporting crop insurance; promoting post-harvest management and introducing silo systems.

The Latin American Office Co-ordinator for IFOAM, Ms Patricia Flores Escudero, stated that: “It is time for the voices of farmers to be heard”. The solution proposed by IFOAM was based on organic agriculture. She proposed a cleaner production system that does not harm the environment and combines traditional and modern technologies to improve the livelihood of those who participate in it. Organic agriculture promotes the health of soils, plants, animals and human beings and it has to be managed in a responsible manner in order to safeguard the health of future generations.

Mr Jorge Lafosse, National Director of Caritas in Peru, believes that: “Adaptation is not a technical theme, it is a moral and ethical imperative”. Climate change effects are increasing in Peru with increased incidence of floods, droughts, diseases such as malaria and dengue, pests in agriculture and difficulty in water management because of the radical change in rain dynamics. “An immediate response to climate change problems is needed, in order to guarantee food security to farmers”. 

The National Coordinator for Caritas in Brazil, Ms Jaime Conrado Oliveira, talked about the long experience that Caritas Brazil has with smallholder agriculture in the semi-arid regions of Brazil, where livelihoods are affected by climate change on an area of 980,000 Km2. Their experience has been disseminated through trainings targeted in particular to youth. “Technology needs to be accompanied by capacity building activities and sensitisation, that give information about the ecological specificities of the area and how these can be addressed”. 

IFAD also believes that smallholders play an important role in the solution to climate change. Through its Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Programme (ASAP), the world’s largest climate change adaptation programme, IFAD channels more than US$350 million to at least 8 million smallholder farmers.Smallholders are our clients and we work to build their resilience to climate-related shocks and stresses” said Ms Estibalitz Morrás Dimas, Portfolio Officer from IFAD’s Environment and Climate division. “Our objectives are to encourage better analysis of the climate risk and promote new technologies and new partnerships, in order to achieve development while preserving biological diversity”.


Many interventions from the floor followed the presentations, leaving space to further discussions on important issues, such as: What is the definition of a climate smart agriculture? Are GMO seeds really climate smart? Where is the place of livestock when disasters struck? Are social changes like migration receiving enough attention? 

1 Responses to Day Three - Building Resilience to Climate Change and Managing Disaster Risks through Sustainable Agriculture
  1. Ramesh said:
  2. These small initiatives are means to aware farmers and relevant stakeholders. But they are not sufficient to build resilience of the farming system. Until and unless we identify the measures to qualify resilience, building resilience is questionable.

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GLF news: Forestry, agriculture and other land use in the global climate agreement - Global Landscapes Forum

GLF news: Forestry, agriculture and other land use in the global climate agreement - Global Landscapes Forum | Agriculture | Scoop.it


Against a backdrop of tree-covered mountains, negotiators from all over the world are meeting in Lima, Peru, for the United Nations annual climate change conference. Before the meeting, Environmental Defense Fund and partners coordinated a workshop in Lima, where a group of country negotiators and other experts discussed how to bring forests and other land uses front and center in the global climate agreement to be signed in Paris next year. Participants agreed that the agreement needs to include land use in a simple, flexible and transparent way to encourage as many countries as possible to take action in this doubly important sector, which both accounts for about a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide and also absorbs a significant fraction of the world’s carbon emissions every year.

At the UN climate conference in Lima, a group of country negotiators and other experts discussed how to bring forests and other land uses front and center in the global climate agreement to be signed in Paris next year.

Photo: UNEP/Flickr

Among other conclusions, participants generally agreed on the need for an approach that allows comparisons of different countries’ mitigation efforts – one that takes into account both the commonalities between land uses in various countries, as well as the range of capabilities and complexities among them (such as distinctions between tropical forests of Peru and temperate forests in the United States, or between croplands and forests). Participants also agreed that such an approach is important in ensuring the overall environmental integrity of the 2015 agreement.


As a starting point for the workshop, a briefing paper on land use in a 2015 agreement was prepared by a group of land use experts with support from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) (see presentations here). The workshop laid out four policy options for including land use, which ranged from complete uniformity in accounting rules to complete differentiation in accounting. Most participants agreed that they preferred a middle approach that fell between those options, starting with the three systems of accounting rules that already apply to different countries, and working toward more harmonization and common elements among them. This path could help Parties move towards a simpler and more comprehensive approach over time, while still building flexibility into the framework, so that Parties could select the system that best fits their own context. The report summarizing the discussion in the workshop can be found here.

Parties will continue the discussion on how to include land use in the 2015 agreement here in Lima this week. EDF hosted a related session at the Global Landscapes Forum in Lima on 6 December.

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Golden opportunities at COP20 UN Climate Negotiations in Lima | Hivos International

Golden opportunities at COP20 UN Climate Negotiations in Lima | Hivos International | Agriculture | Scoop.it


In 3 December 2014, the Gold Standard launched an ambitious Agriculture Programme to address the world’s third largest sector for greenhouse gas emissions. The ‘Agriculture Standard’ was developed by the Gold Standard with support from Hivos to benefit the voluntary carbon markets. The launch took place in Lima, Peru, during an official side event at the 20th session of the Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC (COP20) Climate Negotiations.


The Standard acts as a certification for efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the agricultural sector, while helping local communities develop in a sustainable manner. Hivos, Solidaridad and the Cool Farm Alliance all work together with the Gold Standard to evaluate the positive effects of projects on soils, emissions, sustainable development and the surrounding forests. The aim is to make the Gold Standard’s Agriculture Programme a useful tool for implementing zero-net deforestation commitments.


According to the Gold Standard, “The Agriculture Standard has an ambitious dual mandate: to achieve scale toward climate mitigation in one of the world’s most intensive greenhouse gas emitting sectors, and to empower smallholder farmers in adapting to climate change”.

Hivos has involved a range of its partners in developing the standard, such as agricultural producer organisations, civil society and knowledge institutes, to make it of practical use to smallholder farmers. Three pilot projects are being designed: in Nicaragua to certify emission reductions and development impact in coffee cooperatives; in Peru for the conversion of degraded rice fields into agroforestry systems (bananas, cocoa and timber trees); and in Indonesia and Kenya to certify the application of bio-slurry by small farmers.

Hivos and the Gold Standard presented the Agriculture Programme and how to put it into practice at a well-attended side event called “Landscapes, ecosystem services, and smallholders: putting crosscutting concepts into practice”.


Hivos is also co-hosting a seminar with IFOAM called “Making the case for organic farming and for a low external input: sustainable agriculture as climate-smart landscape solutions”. This will take place on 6 December at the Global Landscapes Forum, a side event outside of the COP that brings together thousands of negotiators, world leaders, researchers, civil society leaders, business leaders, practitioners and policymakers in agriculture, forestry and development, funding organisations and the media.


Want to know more?
Contact our Programme Officer for Carbon Finance and Renewable Energy


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CCAFS at UN Climate Change Conference COP20 | CCAFS: CGIAR research program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security

CCAFS at UN Climate Change Conference COP20 | CCAFS: CGIAR research program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security | Agriculture | Scoop.it
  

29-30 November 2014
Hackathon: Solutions for Climate Change and Food Security

We are looking for new ways to use ICT to bring agricultural research to those most in need, and will reward the best. Do you accept the challenge? 
Venue: International Potato Center (CIP).
 

1-2 December 2014 
Workshop on Approaches and Tools for Agriculture and Climate Change Planning (Herramientas y Métodos para la Planeación y Toma de Decisiones en Agricultura y Cambio Climático)

How can decision-makers and policy makers prioritize investments in agriculture and climate change by making more strategic planning? This workshop aims to share the tools and methods that can make the difference. By invite only
Venue: San Isidro Inn Hotel.

3 December 2014 
Learning session: Mitigating GHG emissions from rural land uses: A decision-support tool for national decision-makers

Learn how to assess and prioritize agricultural mitigations options by country and by regions within countries. The University of Aberdeen, with support from CCAFS, will present a user-friendly tool that can help stakeholders design beneficial and cost-effective mitigation options based on their geographic location. By invite only
Venue: San Isidro Inn Hotel.

3 December 2014 
Increasing the Resilience of Farming Communities to Climate Change through Shared Learning and Adaptation Decision-Making with a Focus on Gender

How can more inclusive adaptation programs be developed in order to support the resilience of indigenous peoples and small-holder farmers and their communities? Climate-smart technologies for agriculture have been developed for some time. However, few of these technologies have been adopted due to lack of resources at multiple levels (financial, technical expertise, personnel) and limited understanding of smallholder farmers’ priorities and needs for adaptation.
Venue: Sipan Room, COP 20 Venue: Cuartel General del Ejército del Perú (CGEP) Av. Boulevar S/N, San Borja Lima 41 Surco, Lima, Peru

4 December 2014 

Hacia un enfoque climáticamente inteligente en la agricultura colombiana (Towards a climate-smart approach Colombian agriculture)

This discussion forum views on what has been achieved in Colombia from a series of gremios, producer organizations, research institutions and the prospect of the Ministry will be shared. And then a panel will discuss how Colombia can be strengthened in the future and out, scaling this model to other countries. This event is open for all - in Spanish only
Venue: Voices for Climate - Mountains and Waters Pavillion.

7 December 2014, 10:00 - 16:00

Seminar on Food and Nutrition Security, Agriculture and Climate Change

On the sidelines of UNFCCC COP20 CCAFS, CARE International and the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA) will host a half-day seminar to raise awareness and showcase actions on approaches to address the food and nutrition security and climate change challenges. 
Venue: Novotel San Isidio Hotel
 

6 - 7 December 2014 
Global Landscapes Forum 2014

A number of sessions feature CCAFS work including:

8 December 2014 09:30 - 12:00

Farmers, agriculture and the UNFCCC

CCAFS is hosting a half-day event  to raise awareness among farmers’ representatives and youth representatives on the status of agriculture in the negotiations, provide a networking space for farmers, and also exchange ideas on influencing agriculture in the UNFCCC going forward to the post-2015 agreement and beyond. By invite only
Venue: Miraflores Colon Hotel

8 December 2014 16:45—18:15
 
Growing climate risks require transformations to climate smart agriculture innovations by farmers, private sector and public services that can provide widely shared livelihood benefits. Presenters, panelists and participants will share recent and emerging progress. Jointly organised by the University of Copenhagen, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), and the Government of Kenya
Venue: Army Headquarters of Peru - Room Paracas
 
Information will be periodically updated
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Official UNFCCC Side Event: Climate-smart agriculture innovations to increase food security and rural incomes under climate change | CCAFS: CGIAR research program on Climate Change, Agriculture and...

Official UNFCCC Side Event: Climate-smart agriculture innovations to increase food security and rural incomes under climate change | CCAFS: CGIAR research program on Climate Change, Agriculture and... | Agriculture | Scoop.it

Growing climate risks require transformation to climate smart agriculture innovations by farmers, private sector and public services in order to provide widely shared livelihood benefits. The event is jointly organised by the University of Copenhagen, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) and the Government of Kenya Ministry of Environment, Water and Natural Resources (MEWNR). 


The session will explore how to leverage policy, technical and financial support to scale-up the adoption of climate smart agriculture practices in farming systems. Event participants will also explore the role of science in informing the integration of CSA innovations into national development policies and programmes.

The event is designed to answer the following key questions:

  1. What frameworks (policy, financial, technical etc.) do countries need to put in place to support the uptake of CSA among rural farmers?
  2. Can blending science and traditional knowledge and practices enhance adaptation to climate change and ensure food security amongst rural communities?
  3. How are emerging CSA technologies leading to increase in rural incomes and enhancing food security?
  4.  How can farmer organizations support the uptake of CSA technologies and practices in rural areas?
Agenda

Facilitator: Stephen King’uyu, State Department of Environment and Natural Resources (MEWNR), Kenya

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Forests or Agriculture: not necessarily an ‘all or nothing’ trade-off

Forests or Agriculture: not necessarily an ‘all or nothing’ trade-off | Agriculture | Scoop.it


BOGOR, Indonesia (16 October, 2012)_Making informed decisions on how to reduce carbon emissions from forestry and agriculture requires some solid knowledge about potential tradeoffs between development and conservation objectives: what you manage to win through  avoided deforestation or reduced cropping emissions has to be weighed against possible farm income losses when first-best farming strategies have to be sacrificed. 

Forest conservation climate mitigation strategies typically involve creating areas where trees are protected. Activities in these areas, such as crop expansion or logging, are restricted or prohibited, so trees are left standing.

Making sure there are trees in the landscape is a definite game changer when it comes to assessing the costs and benefits of different types of land-use strategies for reducing emissions and mitigating climate change. On a per-hectare basis, preserving threatened Amazonian forests provides an exceptionally high mitigation benefit according to a recent CIFOR study.

However, this does not mean that agriculture has no mitigation potential.


Low-cost technological alternatives to conventional agriculture and extensive cattle ranching do exist in the Amazon. For instance, no-till farming, a way of growing crops without mechanically overturning the soil is a now widespread alternative to conventional farming. No-till farming can help maintaining soil fertility and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from biological processes in agricultural soils.

However, while avoiding deforestation and conserving forests can result in substantial emissions reduction, such benefits must be weighed against the possible economic losses of sacrificing income from agriculture. Finding the optimal tradeoff of conserving forests versus developing land for agriculture will therefore be instrumental in ensuring the best use of scarce resources.


Yet, adopting new technologies often requires new skill sets, and improved access to credit or markets, and may expose farmers to risks. That is unattractive for many Amazon smallholders, and explains why they are often hesitant to adopt these techniques, even if research suggests that the profits, on average, are increasing.

Ideal features of climate change mitigation options

There are several criteria we considered when looking to invest in different climate mitigation options.

First, the potential for emissions reduction should be high. Second, the risks of economic failure to the land user should preferably be low. Third, implementing the option should be cheap. And finally, any negative knock-on effects have to be contained.

In practice, none of the available options for mitigating climate change scores highly on all four features. A compromise has to be struck that takes into account the pros and cons of both forestry and agriculture to achieve an integrated reduction in emissions from land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF).


This can only be achieved if land-use mitigation strategies take into account the different local environmental, social and political contexts.  The aforementioned study has shown how different factors can hamper forest conservation and agriculture mitigation efforts, respectively, reducing the kind of benefits that can be achieved.

For instance, while forest-based  mitigation strategies can be implemented more easily than getting farmers to adopt new farming practices, in some contexts poor governance and conflicting claims over land as a result of unclear tenure can reduce the effectiveness of forest conservation in lowering carbon emissions. Here, agricultural reforms could eventually be more interesting.

When choosing between forest conservation and agriculture, the hidden costs associated with forest conservation must be weighed against the potentially high operational and transaction costs of promoting agricultural change through extension programs and infrastructure investments, at often relatively low mitigation benefits per unit of land.


Moreover, promoting agricultural change bears the risk of undesired “spillover effects” such as crop or pasture expansion into forest areas, thus neutralizing the potential mitigation benefits from adopting such technologies.

CIFOR’s and others’ research on deforestation, REDD, and agricultural technologies has shown that these side effects are not only possible, but probable – and thus, at the very least, need to be accounted for. Our scoping attempt reconfirms the prime mitigation potential of trees and forests, but also recommends a fine-tuning of parallel strategies for Amazon frontier forests and established agricultural regions.

This new publication is part of the CGIAR research program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

With additional reporting by Fawziah Selamat.

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FAO Launches New Training Materials on Climate, Gender and Food Security for Agricultural Development Professionals | UNCC:LEARN

FAO Launches New Training Materials on Climate, Gender and Food Security for Agricultural Development Professionals | UNCC:LEARN | Agriculture | Scoop.it


The roles, responsibilities and capabilities of both men and women need to be well understood to ensure effective adaptation to climate change, mitigation and food security. To support researching and catalyzing gender-sensitive, climate-smart agricultural practices, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) launched a training guide titled Gender and Climate Change Research in Agriculture and Food Security for Rural Development. The manual has been developed in collaboration with The CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS) and has been tested in Bangladesh, Uganda, and Ghana.

The manual sets out to provide agricultural development professionals with resources and participatory action research tools for collecting, analyzing and sharing gender-sensitive information about agricultural communities, households and individuals who are facing climate changes. This will for instance sensitize users to the links of socio-economic and gender issues in the context of climate change in the agriculture and food security sectors.

Participatory approaches, sampling strategies, reporting and analysis approaches are provided. The guide also applies knowledge gained beyond research to promote gender-sensitive adaptation and mitigation activities in agriculture. It includes modules that can be added and modified according to future research teams’ study objectives and questions.

For further information please contact micca@fao.org or visit: http://www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/gender/en/.

Gender and Climate Change Research in Agriculture and Food Security for Rural Development: http://www.fao.org/docrep/015/md280e/md280e.pdf.

Blog: Getting to the heart of gender issues in climate change and food security research from the researchers who produced and tested the manuals in the field.

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FAO Online Training Package on Climate Smart Agriculture | UNCC:LEARN

FAO Online Training Package on Climate Smart Agriculture | UNCC:LEARN | Agriculture | Scoop.it

In view of a rapidly growing world population food production needs to become more efficient to cover demands. In order to support government authorities in learning about possible technical solutions and policy tools to address this challenge, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) launched the Climate-Resilient and Environmentally Sound Agriculture or “Climate-Smart” Agriculture: An Information Package for Government Authorities (C-RESAP). Developed in the context of a climate change adaptation project in the Yellow River Basin in China, the package is now available as a web-based version online.  

The training package is designed to provide an overview of the challenges that the agriculture sector, and to a certain extent the food production chain, faces to feed the world while becoming more efficient. It also explores ways to address these challenges. Although it was originally designed for government authorities, it can be used as a training base for other audiences who are interested in climate resilient and environmentally sound agricultural production.

Through simplified concepts and relevant resources and examples, the package explores the impacts of global change on agriculture, the impacts of agriculture on ecosystems and possible technical and policy considerations that can help building food security under current and future challenges. The information package has 6 modules, different levels of text and a wealth of resources from all over the world.

The 6 training modules are organized in two parts:

Part I - Agriculture, food security and ecosystems: current and future challenges

Module 1: An introduction to current and future challenges

Module 2: Climate variability and climate change

Module 3: Impacts of climate change on agro-ecosystems and food production

Module 4: Agriculture, environment and health

Part II - Addressing challenges

Module 5: C-RESAP/climate-smart agriculture: technical considerations and examples of production systems

Module 6: C-RESAP/climate-smart agriculture: supporting tools and policies

For further information or to request a CD-ROM of the package please contact:  cpesap@caas.ac.cn or visit: http://www.cpesap.net/online-c-resap-information-package

To Access the online training package: http://www.cpesap.net/online-c-resap-information-package.

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Sustainable Innovation Forum Speakers - Cop20 Lima

Sustainable Innovation Forum Speakers - Cop20 Lima | Agriculture | Scoop.it

Dr.Peter Holmgren, Director General for the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) since 2012, has a PhD in Forestry from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences with a thesis titled “Geographic Information for Forestry Planning”. His academic work has spanned multiple-objective forestry, forest monitoring and assessment, as
well as forest soil sciences. From his early career he has experience from working with the forest industry, remote sensing agencies and international development. In 1998, Peter joined the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to lead the Global Forest Resources Assessment. Between 2003 and 2007 he was head of forest resources development at FAO, and from 2007 until 2012 Director of the Climate, Energy and Tenure division, including responsibility for the overall profile and coordination of FAO’s work related to climate change.



At FAO, Peter coordinated the support and contributions of FAO to the UNFCCC process. He was part of the interagency team that set up the UN-REDD programme as a unique One-UN partnership. He also led the development of “Climate-smart Agriculture” and coordinated FAO’s preparations for Rio+20. At CIFOR, he has led the charge to work across sector boundaries and promote a landscape perspective to agriculture, forestry, conservation and development. He has also initiated the Evidence-based forestry programme which builds on experiences in medical and social sciences for ensuring that decision-making build on existing and relevant evidence. His current mission is to improve the understanding of the wide range of contributions that forestry makes to sustainable development.
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Value Chain Conference: “Making the connection: value chains for transforming smallholder agriculture” | YPARD

Value Chain Conference: “Making the connection: value chains for transforming smallholder agriculture” | YPARD | Agriculture | Scoop.it
Date:Start in 06 Nov 2012
End in 09 Nov 2012Location:Ethiopia

This unique four day event will bring together international experts and practitioners to:

  • discuss how best to incorporate smallholders into value chains to promote agricultural and rural development,
  • debate how to transform smallholders into entrepreneurs,
  • identify conditions necessary to create a broader and more solid knowledge base for the promotion of sustainable value chains,
  • identify training and information-sharing needs.

Share the floor with key experts and debate how best to incorporate smallholders into value chains and help foster entrepreneurship. Discover best practices and lessons learned from leading organisations around the world in a dynamic environment. Play your part and join representatives from the private sector, government, civil society, and farmer organisations in discussing ways of promoting sustainable agricultural value chains.

Make the connection! Mark your calendar and join some of the world’s leading experts and practitioners at this unique conference.

Now open for Registration

The organisers are pleased to announce that registration for the conference is now open!

Click on this Link to Register: Registration for the Value Chain Conference

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Side-event at COP20 pushes discussions on agriculture certifications

Side-event at COP20 pushes discussions on agriculture certifications | Agriculture | Scoop.it

Jasmine Hyman, a member of Nexus's Board of Directors, moderated a side-event at COP20 climate negotiations in Lima, on December 3, 2014. 

The session entitled "Landscape, ecosystem services, and smallholders: Putting cross-cutting concepts into practice" launched Gold Standard's Agriculture Programme that will confront the world's third largest sector for greenhouse gas emissions. The Gold Standard, with support from Hivos, developed The 'Agriculture Standard,' which will include guidelines for smallholder farmers that will contribute to reductions of greenhouse gases while helping local communities develop long-term sustainability.

Fairtrade, another panelist at the side-event, spoke highly of the certification by mentioning this can make the carbon market work more effectively for the communities and smallholders that work with their local partners. Fairtrade confidently thinks the "Agriculture Programme" will help spur demand for offsetting with an impact.

Nexus was excited to be apart of the launching of Gold Standard's Agriculture Standard and is eager to see it be put into practice during the upcoming year.

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IFAD social reporting blog: This Is Africa: For inclusive rural development, farms come first

IFAD social reporting blog: This Is Africa: For inclusive rural development, farms come first | Agriculture | Scoop.it

The following article by IFAD's President was originally published on 1 December in This Is Africa, an online service of The Financial Times.

Thinking about the future of agriculture in Africa fills me with both pride and trepidation. I am proud that Africa is home to some of the world's fastest growing economies, and that the region has seen foreign domestic investment triple over the last decade.

However, I am concerned that agriculture’s potential to drive inclusive development is being forgotten in this story of growth. Agriculture is our number one ally in the fight against poverty and hunger. Its development must be a top priority.

An infographic developed by IFAD and the Farming First partnership explores the potential of agriculture in Africa.

Sadly, levels of hunger and poverty in sub-Saharan Africa remain consistently higher than those in other regions of the developing world. In Latin America, the extreme poverty rate has fallen by 50 percent since 1999. In East Asia, it has dropped by 63 percent. However, overall sub-Saharan Africa’s poverty fate fell by just 17 percent in the same period.

More recently, of course, we have seen the tragic Ebola outbreak claim thousands of lives in west Africa. Those population have already suffered decades of civil conflict and failed development. The epidemic may well be compounded by a regional food crisis, as trade is disrupted and fields are abandoned by farmers due to fear of infection - or because there are no farmers left.

Today, two thirds of Africans earn their living from agriculture or fisheries, yet Africa imports $35bn worth of food every year. Why? This is food that can be and should be grown in Africa, by Africans. This is money that should be flowing in to support African businesses, not outwards.

There is no excuse for these contradictions, because Africa's agricultural potential is immense. The continent has the world’s largest share of uncultivated land, where rain fed crops could grow in abundance. More importantly, current farming systems are performing very poorly, well below their potential productivity levels. These could be doubled or quadrupled with help from yield-enhancing inputs and conducive policies – in short, through sustainable intensification. Africa also has the youngest population in the world, with approximately 10 million young adults entering the workforce each year.

The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), together with Farming First, wants to see Africa's agricultural promise fulfilled. This infographic demonstrates the scale of that potential.

The data we have gathered speaks volumes about why Africa lags behind other regions. For example, only around 5 percent of cultivated land in Africa is irrigated, compared with 41 percent in Asia. At the same time, farmers in Africa apply only 10 to 13kg of fertilizer per hectare of cultivated land. This compares to more than 100kg in South Asia – even though roughly 75 percent of African soils lack the nutrients needed to grow healthy crops.

Irrigation alone could boost the continent's agricultural output by 50 percent, and efficient use of fertilizer has been proven to triple yields. Imagine the future Africa could have if the appropriate investments and policies were in place to realize just these two interventions.

Of course, that would require a colossal commitment on the part of governments to building the appropriate infrastructure. How can we get fertilizer to farmers when just 16 percent of the roads are paved, and more than one third of sub-Saharan Africa's rural population lives five hours from the nearest market town of 5000 people? Upgrading the road systems would cost an estimated $38bn. On the other hand, it would increase yearly trade by as much as $250bn. This is the future that we should make every effort to reach.

In addition, two major sectors of society – women and young people – must be empowered in order for African agriculture to take off.

Given the central role of women in agriculture, as well as in ensuring household nutrition and wellbeing, their empowerment is a vital component of rural transformation. Africa’s overall GDP could grow by an estimated 11 percent if nutrition levels were improved. If women farmers had the same access to training and resources that men currently do, the number of malnourished people could be reduced significantly.

Meanwhile, Africans aged 14 to 25 comprise a vast workforce of 200 million. With youth unemployment and underemployment rates as high as 35 percent, however, much of that capacity to contribute to society is going to waste. Developing the whole agricultural value chain – from production to processing, marketing and consumption – is key to creating jobs, wealth and a hopeful future for this new generation.

To realize Africa’s potential, we need to dramatically change the way we look at agriculture. Smallholder farming is a significant economic activity, a business enterprise that feeds people and generates wealth. It is a dignified profession and needs to be treated as such, and not just as an activity of the rural poor.

We must take collective action to ensure that Africa’s future includes a vibrant and productive rural economy, which begins on the farm. Only then can we hope to see a continent that is prosperous and free of hunger.

Explore the infographic in full: www.farmingfirst.org/africanag

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IFAD social reporting blog: The marvels of investing in agriculture and believing in the power and potential of smallholder farmers in Azerbaijan

IFAD social reporting blog: The marvels of investing in agriculture and believing in the power and potential of smallholder farmers in Azerbaijan | Agriculture | Scoop.it
The best part of my job is when I get to visit the countries and the people who we work with and serve. This time round, I was fortunate enough to visit my first upper-middle-income country: Azerbaijan.

The World Bank estimates that 86 middle-income countries in the world account for just under half of the world’s population. and they are home to one-third of poor people in the world.

As an upper-middle-income country, Azerbaijan boosts excellent infrastructure, which made my 270 kilometre travel to the IFAD-funded Integrated Rural Development Project in Yevlakh a pleasant “stroll”.

Mehbara Davudova attending to her crop
Photo credit: IFAD/R.SamiiIFAD-funded interventions in Azerbaijan which are closely aligned to the country’s agriculture and rural development strategies have helped develop the agriculture sector as a dominant force in the rural economy and improve food security by providing rural communities with access to assets and services for the sustainable management of natural resources, including improved irrigation and rangeland management. This has resulted in improved living conditions of disadvantaged rural communities.

The Integrated Rural Development Project is assisting rural people to use available natural resources effectively and efficiently allowing them to increase crop and livestock productivity.  Furthermore, it is providing smallholder farmers access to credit so that they can improve the existing irrigation infrastructure.

Before heading off to visit the project site, Samir Nabiyer, the regional coordinator told me that “working together with the Government the project is rehabilitating and reconstructing  irrigation canals covering 70,000 hectares.”

“Our goal is for the smallholder farmers to rehabilitate all the irrigation infrastructure, own their equipment, establish water-user associations and embrace good husbandry practices”.

As part of its agriculture and rural development strategy, the government has put in place measures to improve the living conditions of rural people. One of these, was the rehabilitation of the green houses which is a reminiscence from the Soviet era.

Mehbara Davudova, a well-established smallholder lady farmer, is running a thriving farming business on her 0.15 hectare land thanks to an initial credit of 4000 manat (US$5000).

“Thanks to the loan which I was able to repay in two years, I was able to setup five green-houses, where i plant vegetables 12 months a year”, says Davudova.

Davudova’s farming business provides her a secure income of approximately 1500 manat per month. This has allowed her to rehabilitate two irrigation systems on the farm, build a house and send her 16 year daughter and 8 year old son to school.

“I am hoping that with the profit of the next harvest season, I’ll be able to build another house”, says Davudova with a smile.

 In the neighbouring farm, Sultekin and Arastun Mammadov are also running a flourishing farming business and are engaged in husbandry and livestock.

Visiting their greenhouse, the Mammadovs told me “In winter, just to make sure that cold weather does not damage the crop, we use heaters”.

When I asked them if they had any fire safety and security  measures in place, they did not seem too impressed by my question…..

They were however, intrigued by the proposition of exploiting their livestock further and putting in place biogas digesters to heat the greenhouse. I committed to put the various parties in touch with our colleagues working on the portable biogas project in Kenya.

Who knows, maybe if I get lucky again and have the fortune of visiting them, they will be running highly efficient biogas digesters, providing not only heating for the greenhouse, but also electricity and gas for the kitchen!
Mahir Aliyeb
Photo credit: IFAD/R.Samii
Building the livestock sector
Before heading back to Baku, we visited Mahir Aliyeb, a herder. Aliyeb was able to buy 40 heads of livestock thanks to a loan of 10,000 manat. He probably is a precursor to the future project beneficiaries of IFAD-funded activities.

Aliyeb is renting the land neighbouring his property for grazing purposes. “I pay 2 manat per hectare every year for this grazing land, allowing the cattle to graze on alfa-alfa”, explains Aliyeb.

As an acute businessman, Aliyeb has diversified his source of income. He is making good profit with his daily 25 litres of milk and gets additional income by selling sheep wool and animals to the local abattoirs.

“I know that the people I sell the milk to, make motar cheese and they sell it for 10 manat”, says Aliyeb. “I want to learn how to do this myself, so that I can set up a local business and no longer go through the middleman.”

“I also want to learn how to better take care of my animals, so that they do not get sick and they stay strong. This will allow me to sell not only the animals at higher price, but also to make better and varied dairy products.”

Mahir Aliyeb's cattle heading off to the grazing area
Photo credit: IFAD/R.SamiiThe future holds bright prospects for Aliyeb and his fellow herders, as the next generation of IFAD-funded programmes and projects in Azerbaijan will focus on developing and strengthening value chains with a focus on the livestock sector and more specifically on improving traditional husbandry practices,  putting in place traceability mechanism, as well as enhancing quality and hygiene standards while helping to access new markets.

Hopefully soon, Aliyeb will be able to package his dairy products and not only sell them in supermarkets in Baku and other cities in Azerbaijan, but also start exporting them to neighbouring countries.

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GLF news: A new alliance to spread climate smart agriculture in Africa - Global Landscapes Forum

GLF news: A new alliance to spread climate smart agriculture in Africa - Global Landscapes Forum | Agriculture | Scoop.it


African smallholder farmers have a new ally in their effort to adopt farming practices that raise food production, build resilience to climate change, and create healthier and more sustainable landscapes—that is, practices that are climate smart.

The aim of a new initiative, the Africa Climate-Smart Agriculture Alliance (ACSAA), is to see 6 million smallholder in Africa practicing climate smart agriculture within the coming 7 years. This effort contributes to NEPAD’s Vision 25 x 25, which aims to reach 25 million African farm households by 2025.


“This goal is very practical and very feasible,” said Martin Bwalya, Head of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme, NEPAD at the African Union (AU).

Moreover, “the Alliance addresses things that matter for the development and economic growth of the continent, as expressed at the recent AU Heads of State summit in Malabo,” he added.

Bwalya was speaking at an event hosted by the Africa Climate-Smart Agriculture Alliance in Lima, Peru. The discussion Forum was part of the Global Landscape Forum held alongside Lima COP 20, the 2014 UN climate change conference.

Blog writer Daisy Ouya and guest at the ICRAF booth at GLF. Photo: ICRAF

The ACSAA is an implementation partnership that will address a multi-sectoral issues surrounding African smallholder farmers’ vulnerability in the face of climate change. The issues have agricultural, environmental, social and economic angles. The Alliance will leverage diverse partners, and work to build the capacity of national institutions and community-based organizations (CBOs) to transfer climate smart farming skills to millions of rural farming households.

World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), through the CGIAR, is a partner of the Alliance, and ICRAF Agroecologist Todd Rosenstock was a panelist at the GLF event. He said the flexibility of the package of practices under the umbrella of climate smart agriculture is a major, and essential, strength.

“Climate smart agriculture provides a flexible framework to address food security needs under the realities of climate change,” said Rosenstock.

“The flexibility of CSA is not a weakness, it’s a prerequisite. And what that flexibility allows us to do is to evaluate the relative importance of food security, adaptation and mitigation in the local context.” Rosenstock clarified that the relative importance of these depends on location.

In Africa, food security, adaptation and mitigation are unequally weighted in different local contexts. In many areas, mitigation is seen as a co-benefit of the other two, not as a primary goal.

Read more at Agroforestry World Blog

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UNFCCC Webcast - Lima COP 20 | CMP 10 - On-Demand - International Fund for Agricultural Development

UNFCCC Webcast - Lima COP 20 | CMP 10 - On-Demand - International Fund for Agricultural Development | Agriculture | Scoop.it
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Sustaiable Innovation Forum 2014

Sustaiable Innovation Forum 2014 | Agriculture | Scoop.it

<img height="1" width="1" border="0" alt="" src="http://googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/viewthroughconversion/1015720472/?frame=0&random=1418087843864&cv=7&fst=1418087843864&num=1&fmt=1&guid=ON&u_h=768&u_w=1366&u_ah=768&u_aw=1304&u_cd=24&u_his=2&u_tz=120&u_java=false&u_nplug=7&u_nmime=70&frm=0&url=http%3A//www.cop20lima.org/2013-forum-highlights&ref=http%3A//www.cop20lima.org/&vis=1" />

Network with
Government, Corporates, UN Bodies,
Associations, NGOs, Academics
COP 20. Lima.
The cornerstone for commitment
to the future of our climate
Sustainable Innovation Forum 2014:
Mobilizing the Green Economy
Network with
Government, Corporates, UN Bodies,
Associations, NGOs, Academics
COP 20. Lima.
The cornerstone for commitment
to the future of our climate
2013 Forum Highlights

The fourth annual Sustainable Innovation Forum 2014 was filled with thought-provoking speeches, informative content and superb networking amongst influencers in the climate change space. With addresses from thought-leading speakers such as Achim Steiner, Executive Director, UNEP, Lord Nicholas Stern, Chairman, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and Dr Johannes Meier, CEO of European Climate Foundation among many others, it’s clear why over 500 hand selected attendees joined the Forum in 2013. To see a full breakdown of attendees, testimonials and reasons to attend, please click here


 
“Congratulations on a fantastic event, probably the best at COP19”

  Walter Vergara, Chief, Climate Change and Sustainability Division, Inter-American Development Bank

 

  “Great event, I thoroughly enjoyed the networking”

  Niall Dunne, Chief Sustainability Officer, BT

  • Jonathan Taylor
    Vice-President responsible for Environment and Climate Action, European Investment Bank (EIB)

    Jonathan Taylor has been a Vice President of the European Investment Bank since January 2013. He is a member of the EIB’s Management Committee ...

  • Juan José Guerra Abud
    Minister of Environment and Natural Resources, Mexico

    In 1994, Mr. Guerra became Minister of Economic Development at the State of Mexico Government. From 2009 to 2012, ...

  • Manuel Pulgar-Vidal
    Minister of State for Environment and President of the COP20, Peru

    Manuel Pulgar – Vidal is a lawyer with 27 years of experience in the fields of environmental law and policy. In 2011 he was named Minister of State for Environment, ...

  • Achim Steiner
    Under Secretary General of the United Nations and UNEP Executive Director

    Achim Steiner was elected as the Executive Director of UNEP in 2006. He became the fifth Executive Director in UNEP's history. ...

  • Professor Sir David King
    UK Foreign Secretary’s Special Representative for Climate Change

    Professor Sir David King is The Foreign Secretary’s Special Representative for Climate Change, Chancellor of the University of Liverpool, Chairman of the Futures Cities Catapult, ...

  • Carl Pope
    Special Advisor to Michael Bloomberg

    A veteran leader in the environmental movement, Carl Pope is the former executive director and chairman of the Sierra Club ...

  • Tanya Müller García
    Minister of Environment, Mexico City

    As Minister of Environment, Tanya Müller has fostered Bycicle Mobility programs and strengthened intermodal transportation through expansion...

  • Philippe Joubert
    Chair, Prince of Wales's Corporate Leaders Group

    Mr. Joubert , Senior Advisor and Special Envoy Energy and Climate at WBCSD , currently serves as the Chair of the Prince of Wales’s ...

  • James Close
    Director, Climate Change Group

    James Close, a UK national, brings over 25 years of experience in the field of energy policy , climate change, and private infrastructure...

  • Karsten Löffler
    Manging Director– Allianz Climate Solutions GmbH

    Mr. Karsten Löffler is Managing Director (Geschäftsführer) of Allianz Climate Solutions GmbH (ACS), the Center of Competence of Allianz Group ...

  • Gabriel Quijandría
    Deputy Minister for Strategic Development of Natural Resources, Ministry of the Environment

    Expert on environmental and natural resources management issues with 15 years of experience in several Latin American education and development...

  • Christian Grossmann
    World Bank Group Director, Climate Change

    Christian Grossmann is World Bank Group Director for Climate Change, focused on supporting the International Finance Corporation’s climate-smart investments...

  • Naysán Sahba
    Director, Division of Communications & Public Information (DCPI)

    Mr. Naysán Sahba, was appointed as Director of UNEP's Division of Communications and Public Information in January 2014. Throughout the 17 years of his professional career, which includes assignments with WHO and UNICEF in Africa and Asia...

  • Celia Blauel
    Deputy Mayor of Paris

    Originally from Ferrette, in the French region of Alsace, Celia BLAUEL, 32 years old, obtained a degree from the Strasbourg Institute of Political Studies in 2003....

  • Carlos d’Arce Junior
    Marketing Director for Latin America Region, CNH Industrial N.V.

    Carlos d’Arce joined New Holland Agriculture, a Brand of CNH Industrial, a global leader in the capital good sector and listed both on the New York Stock Exchange...

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SPECIAL COP20 - A Farmers’ Day to discuss climate change and agriculture connections - Climate Policy Observer

SPECIAL COP20 - A Farmers’ Day to discuss climate change and agriculture connections - Climate Policy Observer | Agriculture | Scoop.it

On Wednesday (Dec. 3) an entire day of the COP20/CMP10 was dedicated to the main protagonists of agricultural activity: farmers. Press conferences and side events gave the possibility to farmers’ organizations to speak up and to call for negotiators’ attention.

The importance of the relationship between climate change and agriculture had already been stressed the day before by Mildred Crawford on behalf of the Farmers Constituency, during the high-level ADP Opening Plenary Session. The commitment of the Farmers Constituency to represent millions of farmers from all over the world and to bring a cohesive and multi-disciplinary approach to global agriculture policy processes was also underlined in her speech.

The same call was made by farmers, NGOs members and International Organizations exponents that attended the event on “Building Resilience to Climate Change and Managing Disaster Risk through Sustainable Agriculture”. Adriana Opramolla from Caritas International raised some questions regarding the potential role farmers can and should have inside the international frame of climate negotiations. “We are now in a new era, where climate change is understood not only as an environmental issue. In fact, human rights, development, and sustainability are now part of the discourse”. She urged for the inclusion of farmers inside this new vision. The need to assure a climate resilient agriculture for improving households’ conditions was also outlined by Charles Ogang from World Farmers’ Organization. In addition, the panelists advocated steps towards actions that consider gender issues and the involvement of youth in agriculture.

“This underlines the need for a comprehensive inclusion of the sector in a future agreement” concluded Mildred Crawford underlining the contribution that Farmers Constituency will give to assure the farmers’ voice inside the UNFCC processes.

(Image: side event on “Building Resilience to Climate Change and Managing Disaster Risk through Sustainable Agriculture” at COP20, 3 December 2014, Lima, Peru. Photo credit: Marina Sophia Flevotomas).

Written by Alice Tomaselli in Lima, Peru. In collaboration with Agenzia di Stampa Giovanile sulla Cooperazione allo Sviluppo, Sostenibilità Ambientale e Cambiamenti Climatici (Youth Press Agency on Climate Change, Development Cooperation and Sustainable Development).

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