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Rescooped by Lydia Dingeman from The Indigenous Uprising of the British Isles
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Discovery of Monsanto GMO wheat threatens US exports — RT News

Discovery of Monsanto GMO wheat threatens US exports — RT News | Agriculture | Scoop.it
The discovery of a Monsanto-created, genetically modified strain of wheat in the US that was never approved by the United States Department of Agriculture has imperiled US exports of a staple world food commodity.

Via Infidel Patriot
Lydia Dingeman's insight:

The Discovery of the Monsanto GMO is threating the us exports. Japan has said they will be buying western white and feed wheat. Other countries are closly montering the situation too. 

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The Global Miller: FAO Statistical Yearbook paints a detailed picture of food and agriculture

The Global Miller: FAO Statistical Yearbook paints a detailed picture of food and agriculture | Agriculture | Scoop.it
In my talk, I'll cover a number of business, political, social, economic, demographic and technological trends, including precision agriculture, data mining/business analytics, biofuels, hydroponics, vertical farming, synthetic ...

Via Perendale Publishers (Tuti Tan)
Lydia Dingeman's insight:

This artical is about agricultuer what it is doing to the enviorment. Also how the food production has expanded throughout the years. 

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Rescooped by Lydia Dingeman from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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The next big market for data and connected devices? Agriculture | GigaOM Ag Tech News

The next big market for data and connected devices? Agriculture | GigaOM Ag Tech News | Agriculture | Scoop.it

Between efforts to eat more food grown locally, a younger generation of farmers and cheaper component-farming is getting an infusion of data and technology.

 

Most of us know about the connected cows, where the milking operations are governed by connected sensors and algorithms that determine how long to milk and cow and which cows need milking. But it’s not just dairy farmers upgrading their technology and connecting their fields: it’s vinters, soybean growers and wide assortment of agricultural interests.

 

Alicia Asin, the CEO of sensor-making company Libelium, said in a recent interview that 18 percent of her company’s €3 million (about $4 million) in sales this year came from agricultural buyers. By the way, you can see Asin speak at our Mobilize conference in San Francisco on October 16 and 17.

 

Libelium has a powerful case study with several connected vineyards in the Rias Baixas region of Spain that saw a 20 percent reduction in the application of fertilizers and fungicides, and a 15 percent improvement in growing productivity. But vineyards aren’t the only interested cohort. Modern Farmer had a story in May on a greenhouse farmer used sensors to track the temperature in his greenhouse and notify him when temperatures rose too high. The same article detailed how Steve Spence, an amateur organic farmer in South Carolina, built a system that uses water (and waste) from his fish pond to irrigate and fertilize his vegetables. The water quality sensors help him know the right time to unleash the pond water.

 

The key in the Spence story (and the article) is that commercial sensors for farms are now getting cheaper and we have open protocols to help DIY farmers put it together.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Lydia Dingeman's insight:

This artical is mainly about how teconaogy is changing on the farm. Farmers are starting to use more teconogy in the feilds. Things are getting cheaper so now the acess to the teconogly is getting easiser. 

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amber.hartgers's comment, September 30, 2013 10:43 AM
I think that this is cool how the younger generation is bringing tech to farming. But there is a problem with that because the older men wont know how to work the machines and if something goes wrong some men wont know how to fix it. They would have to bring a tech guy in and that might take a while to get him there to fix it.
Rescooped by Lydia Dingeman from Organic Farming
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10 Big Trends for Agriculture

10 Big Trends for Agriculture | Agriculture | Scoop.it

I’ve got a number of keynotes coming up in the New Year focused on the agricultural sector, and have done quite a few in the past.

My insight resonates with the agricultural crowd, whether farmers, ranchers, or agricultural support and bio-science companies. I recently spoke to the top 100 cattle, stockyard and feedlot operators in the US at a private event in Sonoma County, California. The US Farm Credit Cooperative has brought me in twice. Want to think about opportunity? Read the post, Agriculture 2020! Innovation, Growth & Opportunity — and also read on below.

Massive growth in food demand: The UK Food and Agriculture Association estimates that the world population will increase 47%, to 8.9 billion, by 2050. That’s a potentially huge food marketplace. That fact, more than anything, spells the reality that the agricultural industry is full of potential opportunity!A continuing rampup in efficiency: Simple fact: global agriculture must double in the next 30 years to sustain this type of population growth. Add this reality check: there is little new arable land in the world. The result is that existing producers will have to continue to focus on smarter, better, more efficient growing in order to meeting demand.Hyper-science: One of the realities of the infinite idea loop in which we now find ourselves is this: while there are 19 million known chemical substances today, the number is constantly doubling every 13 years… with some 80 million by 2025, and 5 billion by 2100. Science is evolving at a furious pace, and with science at the root of agriculture, we will continue to see constant, relentless new methods of improving crop and livestock yield.Innovation defines success: Growers that focus on innovation as a core value will find success; their innovation will focus on the triple-feature need for growth, efficiency and ingestion of new science. It will be by adopting new methodologies, products, partnerships and ideas that they will learn to thrive.Retail and packaging innovation drive agricultural decisions: Do this: stare at a banana. Did you know that Chiquita banana has come up with a special membrane that doubles the shelf-life of the product, doing this regulating the flow of gases through the packaging? Take a look at Naturepops: each lollipop is wrapped in fully bio-degradable film made from plant matter, and the bags they come in are made from recycled paper, water-based ink and poly lactic acid made from cornstarch. There’s a huge amount of innovation happening with packaging companies and on the store shelf, and all of these trends have a big impact on agriculture.Intelligent packaging moves front and center: Innovation with packaging will take an even bigger leap in years to come, and will involve hyperconnectivity, a trend that will be driven by food safety, tracability, country of origin and nutrition labelling needs. Our lives are soon to be transformed by packaging that can “connect” to the global data grid that surrounds us; and its’ role will have been transformed from being that of a “container of product” to an intelligent technology that will help us with use of the product, or which will help us address safety and tracability issues.The energy opportunity: Agriculture is set to play a huge role as we wean ourselves away from our dependence on oil and natural gas. The US Department of Energy plans to see alternative fuels provide 5% of the nations energy by 2020, up from 1% today. And it is expected that there will be $1.2 billion in new income for farmers and rural landowners by getting involved with new energy sources such as windpower. Europe plans to have a market that involves at least 20% usage of bio-fuels by 2020, and Feed & Grain estimates that liquid fuels from agricultural feed could replace 25% to 30% of US petroleum imports by that time.Convenience and health take center stage: We will continue to see rapid change in consumer taste and expectations as people comes to place more emphasis or doing their best with the little time that they have. For example, it is expected that fresh-cut snacks grew from an $8.8 billion market in 2003 to $10.5 billion by 2004, according to the International Fresh-Cut Produce Association, as part of a trend in which produce and fruit continue to compete with traditional snacks. Expect such unique trends to growth both in terms of number and rapidity.Direct consumer-producer relationships blossom: As this technology evolves and as people become more concerned about the safety of what they eat, a natural result is a frenetic rate of growth in direct relationships between growers and consumers. Check out SouthDakotaCertifiedBeef– that type of thing defines the future of this trend!Generational transformation: perhaps the biggest trend is that we are about to witness a sea-change in the rate by which new ideas in the world of agriculture are accepted, as a new generation of technology-weaned, innovative younger people take over the family farm.Partnership defines success: If there is one trend I emphasize in every industry I’m involved with, it is that no one individual or organization can know everything there is to know. As I indicated in my I found the future in manure article, this trend is also becoming prevalent in agriculture. We will continue to see an increasing number of partnerships between growers and advisers, suppliers, buyers, retailers and just about everyone else, so that they learn to deal with the massive complexities that emerge from rapid change and innovation.


Via Giri Kumar
Lydia Dingeman's insight:

This artical is about how the world population is going to increace by 43% by 2050. Agriculture needs to become more efficant in order to keep up with the poplaustion groth of the world.

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Jazz VanHemert's comment, September 27, 2013 10:36 AM
I think this should be very concerning to people because if we don't have enough food for everyone. There could be big problems if there isn't enough food. Hopefully with new technology we can figure out a way to prevent that.
Loran Sneller's curator insight, September 29, 2013 3:41 PM

In the year 2050 the world population will increase 47%, to 8.9 billion. Global agriculture must double in the next 30 years to sustain this type of population growth.The result is that existing producers will have to continue to focus on smarter, better, more efficient growing in order to meeting demand.One of the realities of the infinite idea loop in which we now find ourselves is this: while there are 19 million known chemical substances today, the number is constantly doubling every 13 years… with some 80 million by 2025, and 5 billion by 2100. There’s a huge amount of innovation happening with packaging companies and on the store shelf, and all of these trends have a big impact on agriculture.

amagazinecalledbible's curator insight, October 1, 2013 7:25 AM

#windpower #sustainabledevelopment #renewable

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Top 5 Trends In Agriculture Technology - CropLife

Top 5 Trends In Agriculture Technology - CropLife | Agriculture | Scoop.it

"Top 5 Trends In Agriculture Technology" CropLife - Big data, robotics are among the five most significant trends in agriculture technology for retailers. March 1, 2013. By Joseph Russo. Email Article Print Article.

Lydia Dingeman's insight:

This artical is about how technology is trending in agriculture. Emerging technology is arguably one of the most significant issues ahead for agriculture retailers.

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Cole Larson's comment, October 2, 2013 12:14 PM
Well technology is a very very big thing in this world. We run on it and we could be destroyed by it. I'm obviously blowing this out of the water, but we can love it for the time being. I love tech to, but we need to watch it for a long while.
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Five Future Trends in Agriculture | Jump the Curve with Jack Uldrich

Five Future Trends in Agriculture | Jump the Curve with Jack Uldrich | Agriculture | Scoop.it
In my talk, I'll cover a number of business, political, social, economic, demographic and technological trends, including precision agriculture, data mining/business analytics, biofuels, hydroponics, vertical farming, synthetic ...
Lydia Dingeman's insight:

This artical is about the five things that are thought to be the future trends in agriculture. They are geneticly modified crops, nanotechnology, urban agriculture, sensor teconology, and robitics.

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Agriculture 2020! Innovation, growth & opportunity!

Agriculture 2020! Innovation, growth & opportunity! | Agriculture | Scoop.it
Related posts: 10 Big Trends for Agriculture Where’s the growth? Rethinking long term opportunity Farmers, producers, ranchers and innovation… Innovators always focus on growth! Video clip — where's the opportunity?
Lydia Dingeman's insight:

This artical is about the grouth of the world and what we will have to do in order to keep up the demand that the world has. That means farmers will have to produce more than they are now. The demads will drive for inovation. 

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Jessica Pottridge's comment, October 2, 2013 11:59 AM
This is a great article. It really shows how much technology and using your resources can help us move forward even in agriculture.
katelyn kime's comment, October 2, 2013 12:13 PM
It is so incredible how far technology has gotten us today. You think of technology and just think of high tech computers or phones, ipads ext but its more than that it has even helped as far out as farming which is crazy. Technology is making things more simpler and is really good as it makes things better sometimes.
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Agriculture, the New Game of Drones

Agriculture, the New Game of Drones | Agriculture | Scoop.it

Aerial drones are about to become an everyday part of our lives. This is an industry in its infancy and agriculture will be the launch point and proving ground for many others.
Farmers will become thousands of times more precise in how they apply chemicals and fertilizers, saving themselves millions in the process.
Saving farmers 1% on inputs like herbicide and pesticide, and increasing their yields by 1%, that alone is a multi-billion dollar industry.
In the end, the world will grow far more food, to far more exacting quality standards, under virtually any weather conditions. And drones will be an essential part of making this happen.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Lydia Dingeman's insight:

This artcial is about how farmers are using drones to futher there knowlage about framing. 

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Laurel Stelter's comment, October 2, 2013 12:15 PM
I think that the drones will also benefit farmers. They can get information from the drowns about their crops/land. I don't understand why people in Deer Trail, Colorado get a $100 reward if they shoot down a drone. That doesn't make sense to me. What if the drones were farmer's or not from another country? To summarize, I think the drones will be a huge advancement in farming.
Cassie Brannan's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:23 AM

Saerial drones are beginning to be apart of farming. They will make it easier for the farmers to apply chemicals and fertilizers to their crops. By using the drop to help the farmers, the produce of food will increase. Therefore, there will be enough food for everyone in the world to eat.

morgan knight's curator insight, November 5, 2014 5:08 PM

It's astonishing to think that our agricultural business will be taken over by drones in a matter of years. And the range of options that they can be used for is incredible. They'll be able to do everything from pick out a spot to plant crops to actually planting the crops itself.