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Oprah keeps chickens, so why can’t we? The urban farming movement in Canada

Oprah keeps chickens, so why can’t we? The urban farming movement in Canada | agriculture | Scoop.it
Last month, media maven Oprah Winfrey took to Twitter to show the world that she knows where her food comes from.
josh dekoning's insight:

This article is about people who live in Canadian cities are not allowed to have chickens because people are worried they are going to spread diseases.  I think that chickins should not be allowed in big cities because they can spread disease.  Smaller farming cities would be okay to have chickens in becuase the people are usually more agricultural based.

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sebastian Martin's comment, October 4, 2013 8:53 AM
Some people want to be able to own chickens in the city. However, they can't do this because it is illegal. These people want the chickens to treat as pets. They think they are being treated badly in the plants. I think that people should not have chickens in the city because it is strange.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 17, 2013 6:31 PM
Interesting, Josh. I've never thought about this topic, but I agree with your point.
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Global farmland offers potential for asset deals

Global farmland offers potential for asset deals | agriculture | Scoop.it

As the world’s population swells beyond seven billion and emerging markets’ appetite for food grows, Canadian institutions are getting increasingly hungry for agribusiness and farmland acquisitions abroad.

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Canadian institutions, tired of the lacklustre returns in the market, are seeking options with better yields than gold and government bonds, such as agriculture, experts say.

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This year, Canada Pension Plan Investment Board launched its agriculture investment program, and made its first direct farmland investment in a portfolio of U.S. farmland.

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CPP’s initial focus will be the U.S., Canada, Australia and New Zealand, it added.

 

Meanwhile, the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Fund at the beginning of this year created a “natural resources” investment asset class. Teachers says it will look for “new opportunities in oil and gas and agriculture.”

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Last year, Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec and British Columbia Investment Management Corp. joined with U.S. financial services company TIAA-CREF to create a global agriculture investment vehicle, with $2-billion earmarked to buy farmland in the U.S., Australia and Brazil. In 2011, Alberta Investment Management Corp (AIMCo), joined a forestry management firm in a $415-million acquisition of Australian timberlands — options for which chief executive Leo de Bever said included reverting it to agriculture.

 

Farmland, with its steadily rising prices, is a tantalizing investment option – and one that provides interim income by leasing it to agricultural operations, says Mr. Barnes.

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Farmland values across the globe between 2002 and 2010 have risen up to 1,800%, according to the Global Farmland Index compiled by U.K.-based real estate firm Savil.

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But the fact that prices have escalated so rapidly is a problem for potential investors, says AIMCo’s Mr. de Bever. He wonders whether the investment potential for farmland has run its course.

 

He explains that the rationale for investing in land is that, with rising demand for protein in the Far East, existing landstock will become more valuable. Yet he points out that land values operate on a long cycle, and that the recent run up in value has been compressed into a short timeframe. “It’s not clear to me that any increase in farm prices is going to be rewarded with an appropriate return.”

 

Still, Mr. de Bever says AIMCO, and other investors, will keep an eye out for farmland acquisitions — albeit a cautious one. “My guess is that there is still going to be quite a bit of demand. My concern is that I would be very picky and make sure that you’re buying right.”


Via Sam Radcliffe
josh dekoning's insight:

The people of Canada are starting to buy up more farmland becuase the value is increasing and they can see the amount of potential money they can make.    With more land available we will be able to provide food for the 7 billion people on the world.  Hopefully the price will not continue to grow otherwise people will not be able to afford to buy it because they won't be able to make their money back and will lose money.

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Sam Radcliffe's curator insight, September 27, 2013 9:24 AM

A lot of parallels between this demand for farmland and the demand for timberland, and a lot of the same players. It will be interesting to see if the structural changes in farmland investment (e.g. TIAA) get adopted for timberland.

Jack D Bridges's curator insight, September 30, 2013 11:24 AM

Great find from Mr. Sam Radcliffe, of Prentiss & Carlisle (http://www.prentissandcarlisle.com/).

 

If Mr. Radcliffe is right, and the same trend follows apace for global timberland markets--look out. I can think of a few established firms who will gladly sell to the many new buyers who will be forced to chase prices higher still....so much for efficient markets, huh? 

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Oil and ag compete for role of ND's biggest industry

Part 1: Overview and Identification; Part 2: Natural History; Part 3: Monitoring; Part 4: Management (Updates on spotted wing drosophila #SWD at http://t.co/dIaMnZreEL #PennState @agsciences)...
josh dekoning's insight:

Oil is a huge industry in North Dakota.  I think that this is great becuase all they have is agriculture besides this oil.  The oil brings billions of dollars to North Dakota.  In 2012 the oil industry set an all time record for the amount of oil produced.

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josh dekoning's comment, September 24, 2013 4:06 PM
The oil industry has become better than farming in North Dakota. Crude oil produced in North Dakota is $24.9 billion based on the production figure and average figures.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 17, 2013 6:32 PM
Wow! And the U.S. just became the world's #1 oil exporter last week.
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Harvest begins!

Harvest begins! | agriculture | Scoop.it
Part 1: Overview and Identification; Part 2: Natural History; Part 3: Monitoring; Part 4: Management (Updates on spotted wing drosophila #SWD at http://t.co/dIaMnZreEL #PennState @agsciences)...
josh dekoning's insight:

This article discusses the amount of crops harvested last year compared to this year.  As of right now the amount of corn is less than what it was last year at this same time.  There has been somewhat of a drought that has worried many farmers.  So far the  harvest is better than farmers were expecting because of the lack of rain.  I think this would be a very stressful time for farmers becuase they are not harvesting as much as they would like to be.  They depend on the wather so much for the crops to grow the best.

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josh dekoning's comment, September 24, 2013 3:42 PM
the corn in the south is being harvested and it is at 4% last year it was at 10% harvested. The yields are four times larger that last year. The yields are upward from last week 155.3 bu/acre. The soybeans in Northern US, where they were planted first, are losing there leaves already.
Sage Lafollette's comment, September 25, 2013 11:06 AM
Yeah the corn isn't doing very well this year because all of the heat that we have had. Its killing all of the corn.
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Urban agriculture: The potential and challenges of producing food in ...

Urban agriculture: The potential and challenges of producing food in ... | agriculture | Scoop.it
In many cities around the world, patrons of high-end restaurants want quality food that is flavorful and fresh. To satisfy their guests, chefs are looking closer and closer to home – to locally grown produce from neighboring farms ...
josh dekoning's insight:

As health becomes a bigger concern for people they like to know where their food comes from.  Urban gardens have started so that they can grow their own food.  This allows them to pick and cook their food all in the same day.  Restrauants are also starting to do this to make customers happy and to keep prices low.  I think this is a good idea becuase prices should go down if the demand is not as high because people are growing their own.  There are good health benefits becuase people know where their food comes from and how it is grown.

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josh dekoning's comment, September 23, 2013 3:52 PM
They had to find out where to grow the food better in the city or outside of the city. They found 6 sites in the city and 40 miles west of the city.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 17, 2013 6:33 PM
Excellent points! Showing nice thought, Josh!
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Farming Goes Vertical in Vancouver

Farming Goes Vertical in Vancouver | agriculture | Scoop.it
You saw it here first, the beginning of vertical farming in Canada. (Vertical farming in Vancouver. What do you think, the future of urban farming?
josh dekoning's insight:

I think that this is a great idea.  With our population rising space is becoming more and more limited.  With this new pracice of growing vegetables vertically it will give us more space to do so.  I think that this could work great for bigger cities  so that they would not have to have as much food shipped in.  It could also work in places of poverty if there was a localized growing area that could mass produce in a small area.

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Research - United States Map: Estimated Market Value of Farmland and Buildings | The Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis

Research - United States Map: Estimated Market Value of Farmland and Buildings | The Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis | agriculture | Scoop.it
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josh dekoning's comment, September 25, 2013 11:03 AM
This map is about how much bushels are harvested.
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Colorado Floodwaters Menace State's $41B Agriculture Sector | PropertyCasualty360

Colorado Floodwaters Menace State's $41B Agriculture Sector | PropertyCasualty360 | agriculture | Scoop.it
Part 1: Overview and Identification; Part 2: Natural History; Part 3: Monitoring; Part 4: Management (Updates on spotted wing drosophila #SWD at http://t.co/dIaMnZreEL #PennState @agsciences)...
josh dekoning's insight:

Colorado was recentlly hit with floods which is affecting their crops. The corn may have to sit in the water which will cause it to rot while the wheat fields (which received rain from the storms) are doing well becuase they can use the water.  If the water does go down the farmers may still not be able to harvest becuase of the debris in the fields.  Damage was also done to farm machinery so they may not have the equipment.   If they would go into the fields and damage their machinery they will lose even more money.

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josh dekoning's comment, September 24, 2013 3:59 PM
The farmers in Colorado could lose $2 billion lose of their crop if they don't get it out before it rots. The yield for the crop it between 140 million and 180 million bushels. The state pushes $41 billion a year into the states economy with 173,000 people works in the agriculture.
Sage Lafollette's comment, September 25, 2013 11:08 AM
The corn is all dieing so they wont get as much as they where suspecting to get back.
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Railroads say they're ready for harvest

Railroads say they're ready for harvest | agriculture | Scoop.it
Part 1: Overview and Identification; Part 2: Natural History; Part 3: Monitoring; Part 4: Management (Updates on spotted wing drosophila #SWD at http://t.co/dIaMnZreEL #PennState @agsciences)...
josh dekoning's insight:

Railroad companies transport lots of grain in their trains.  With more corn being grown less space is available for storage so it sometimes needs to be shipped for starage in other states or to be sold.  This is a convenient way to transport a large amount.  Trains can be very long so much more corn can be moved at once instead of in a semi.

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josh dekoning's comment, September 23, 2013 4:08 PM
It says that the railroads are ready to start the harvest again.
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Airborne imaging could revolutionise agriculture - CORDIS

Airborne imaging could revolutionise agriculture - CORDIS | agriculture | Scoop.it
An airborne camera capable of photographing the condition of certain crops over many acres of land could provide agriculturalists with the information they need to improve production. This is because, instead of simply ...
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josh dekoning's comment, September 23, 2013 1:39 PM
They said in this article that the camera could look at the field and look in the crop.