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Population, Sustainability, and Malthus

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th century, but for some reason, he keeps coming up when we talk about population. In 1800, the human population of the Earth passed 1 billion, and Thomas Malthus posited that growth had hit its ceiling, and the population would level off and stop growing. He was totally right. Just kidding, he was totally wrong! There are like 7 billion people on the planet now! John will teach a little about how Malthus made his calculations, and explain how Malthus came up with the wrong answer. As is often the case, it has to do with making projections based on faulty assumptions. Man, people do that a lot.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 2017 4:15 PM

This is a succinct summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHGunit 2 population

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Psychology of colors, McDonalds & Fast Food Giants

Subscribe Here https://goo.gl/fsQayx Science of color. I was always curious about why different companies use particular type of color for their log and an
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Farm On: Sustainable Food Production

Learn more about advanced farming methods that allow today's farmers and ranchers to be more sustainable. For more information, visit FoodDialogues.com.
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FDA announces compliance date for food labeling regulations

FDA announces compliance date for food labeling regulations | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today that January 1, 2020, will be the uniform compliance date for food labeling regulations that are issued in calendar years 2017 and 2018. This action does not change existing requirements for compliance dates contained in final rules published before January 1, 2017. The FDA issues regulations that sometimes require changes in the labeling of food. Since 1996, the agency has periodically announced uniform compliance dates for new food labeling requirements to minimize the economic impact on the . . .
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7 food trends for 2017

7 food trends for 2017 | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
We put leading chefs and restaurateurs on the spot, asking them to identify the trends that will influence foodservice menus this year.
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Reducing Food Waste

Reducing Food Waste | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it

"Aside from the social, economic, and moral implications of that waste—in a world where an estimated 805 million people go to bed hungry each night—the environmental cost of producing all that food, for nothing, is staggering."

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Factory farming practices are under scrutiny again in N.C. after disastrous hurricane floods

Factory farming practices are under scrutiny again in N.C. after disastrous hurricane floods | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
As fecal waste and bacteria flow from hog lagoons into the water supply, North Carolina is revisiting a contentious battle between the pork industry, health experts and environmentalists.

 

In regions where hog farm density is high, there is an overall poor sanitary quality of surface waters. The presence of mass-scale swine and poultry lots and processing plants in a sandy floodplain – a region once dotted by small tobacco farms – has long posed a difficult dilemma for a state where swine and poultry represent billions of dollars a year for the economy. [Past] hurricane’s environmental impact in North Carolina were so severe in part because of the large number of hog lagoon breaches. Following Hurricane Matthew, the department has counted 10 to 12 lagoons that were inundated, with floodwaters topping the berms and spreading diluted waste.

 

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture, agricultural environment, environment, environment modify, pollution. 


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The Spice Trade's Legacy

The Spice Trade's Legacy | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it

"In its day, the spice trade was the world’s biggest industry. It established and destroyed empires and helped the Europeans (who were looking for alternate routes to the east) map the globe through their discovery of new continents. What was once tightly controlled by the Arabs for centuries was now available throughout Europe with the establishment of the Ocean Spice Trade route connecting Europe directly to South Asia (India) and South East Asia."


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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, February 19, 1:49 PM
History and AP Human Geography!  How has globalization changed the world? 
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, April 3, 8:10 AM
A very insightful article and shows the uttermost importance of geography in many phases. First off, it shows the importance of  having key resources within your country or region. Southeast Asia is know for its spices which made it especially key during the age of exploration. Also, which is key is how do we get there? What are the best trade routes? Over the years, first the Romans then the Ottoman Empire controlled key lands in which connected Europe and Southeast Asia. Since, the Christian Europeans did not want to work with the Muslims  they found new trade routes and well eventually we end up discovering the New World (the Americas". This shows how everything like always connects. Southeast Asia, which for most of its time  has been colonized up until almost the mid 1980s is finally starting to grow on its own. It will be interesting to see how they use there own resources to try to gain traction in the global markets throughout the next few decades and it we see any smaller world powers come out of the area. The spice trade dominated thousands of years of trade, but Southeast Asia has many other key resources as well and it will be key for politicians and businesses in the future to capitalize on this into the future. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 3:06 AM
It is no exaggeration to say that the spice trade shaped the world as we know it today. Southeast Asia's location made it the only place in the world to obtain some of the most popular spices and other goods. Meanwhile Constantinople, being situated squarely between Europe and Asia, was the perfect middleman through which spices could get to markets in Europe -- where demand was high from Antiquity through the Middle Ages -- until the city fell to the Ottoman Empire and turned its back on Europe. This motivated Europeans to develop the sailing and navigational technology necessary to find sea routes to Asia, which led to the discovery of the Americas, and the rest is history. What followed were centuries of colonization, conflict, trade, and globalization on a scale the world had never seen before. All because people were crazy for spices that could only be found half-way around the world.
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Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped

Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it

"Data viz extraordinaire Max Galka created this map using NASA’s gridded population data, which counts the global population within each nine-square-mile patch of Earth, instead of within each each district, state, or country border. Out of the 28 million total cells, the ones with a population over 8,000 are colored in yellow."

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.


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Brian Weekley's curator insight, July 27, 2016 10:47 AM
Great simple map of world population.  Scroll down and look at the U.S.  It reflects the global trend.  This also has political implications, as evidenced by voting patterns in the 2012 presidential election.  Elections are dependent upon votes, which come from people, which are primarily clustered in cities.  Election campaigns would use this data to plan their schedules as to where to focus their campaigning efforts.  For the folks in Wyoming, they rarely see candidates other than during the primaries.  And these world populationclusters have been relatively consistent historically, particularly in south and east Asia.  Northern India has serious carrying capacity challenges. Notice the clusters along the Nile- evidence of arable land.
Francisco Restivo's curator insight, August 8, 2016 5:49 PM
Fantastic visualization!
David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 8, 2016 5:55 PM

Geeky-cool stuff! Thanks to Jim Lerman.

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Making Ethanol from Sugarcane

This segment highlights how sugarcane is processed into ethanol for fuel and other uses.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 2016 2:37 PM

Sugarcane ethanol has proven to be one of the most environmentally safe alternative fuel sources. In addition to its green energy properties, sugarcane ethanol has fueled the Brazilian economy for over a decade. The Brazilian automotive industry have developed a complex, “Flex Fuel” engine that allows vehicles to run off of both gasoline and ethanol. Also, sugarcane ethanol has been one of their leading exports in the global economy. Due to recently discovered fuel deposits in Brazil and around the globe, there has been a decline in the need for sugarcane ethanol. This has negatively impacted the economy in addition to the Brazilian job market. But thanks to the engineering of cellulosic ethanol, Brazil is striving to become the green energy superpower yet again.

 

Questions to Ponder: Since cellulosic ethanol production is so expensive, do you think that will deter production and customers from purchasing it? Do you think that Brazil will ever become independent of fossil fuels as a result of their successful sugarcane ethanol production?

 

Tagsenergy, resourcespolitical ecologyagriculture, food production, land use, Brazil, South America.

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, February 15, 2:50 PM
While the process of making ethanol takes a long time and is expensive, I think it is worth investing in and pursuing as an alternative to fossil fuels.  Like most products, once the process of making the ethanol is perfected and made more efficient, it will be cheaper and easier to make.  Brazil has not invested as much time in the product after they found reserves of oil, because the oil was more profitable.  The demand in the world in extremely high and therefore it was more economically wise for Brazil to put focus on fossil fuel extraction.  However, they already have created technology that is able to run on ethanol and they’ve realized that the product is more environmentally friendly.  This means that the potential to stop relying on fossil fuels is realistic. Since sugar is a renewable resource, it makes more long term economic sense to invest into sugarcane and ethanol production because fossil fuels will eventually run out.
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A Map Of Where Your Food Originated May Surprise You

A Map Of Where Your Food Originated May Surprise You | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
A new study reveals the full extent of globalization in our food supply. More than two-thirds of the crops that underpin national diets originally came from somewhere else — often far away.

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A grocery store on wheels is changing how people can access fresh produce in food deserts

A grocery store on wheels is changing how people can access fresh produce in food deserts | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
Mobile farmers markets are popping up in cities throughout North America.

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How Foursquare knew before almost anyone how bad things were for Chipotle

How Foursquare knew before almost anyone how bad things were for Chipotle | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
Chipotle announced its first loss as a public company Tuesday.
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What are El Niño and La Niña?

What are El Niño and La Niña? | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it

"El Niño and La Niña are complex weather patterns resulting from variations in ocean temperatures in the Equatorial Pacific--officially known as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle. These deviations from normal surface temperatures can have large-scale impacts not only on ocean processes, but also on global weather and climate."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 8, 2017 3:41 PM

This short video from NOAA is an excellent summary that explains the ENSO cycle.  The video has a particular emphasis on how changing patterns in the Pacific Ocean currents can impact weather patterns in various regions of the United States.  

 

Tagsphysical, weather and climateregions, USA.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, February 24, 2017 2:31 AM
What are El Niño and La Niña?
Loreto Vargas's curator insight, February 24, 2017 12:45 PM
It’s a complicated phenomenon but El Niño is not the same as La Niña... Read the article.
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The Future Of Food Production - Short Documentary

Investigating into the current system of food production of conventional agriculture. The current system inedibly is failing us and there is only one wa
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Specialty foods and beverages continue to draw in consumers

Specialty foods and beverages continue to draw in consumers | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
Americans, especially millennials and men, continue to discover specialty foods and beverages as they become a larger, more integral part of the American diet, according to "Today's Specialty Food Consumer," an annual report from the Specialty Food Association. This robust survey, produced in conjunction with market researcher Mintel, is now available at www.specialtyfood.com/consumer2016. The $120.5 billion industry saw specialty food consumption jump significantly in 2016—60 percent of consumers, across all age groups, say they have bought a specialty food or beverage in the past six . . .
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Can agriculture manage without pesticides? - SWI swissinfo.ch

Can agriculture manage without pesticides? - SWI swissinfo.ch | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
More and more experts are convinced it would be possible to feed the planet using farming that is smaller scale, diversified and that forgoes th
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Israel Proves the Desalination Era Is Here

Israel Proves the Desalination Era Is Here | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
One of the driest countries on Earth now makes more freshwater than it needs

 

Driven by necessity, Israel is learning to squeeze more out of a drop of water than any country on Earth; researchers have pioneered new techniques in drip irrigation, water treatment and desalination. “The Middle East is drying up,” says Osnat Gillor, a professor at the Zuckerberg Institute who studies the use of recycled wastewater on crops. “The only country that isn’t suffering acute water stress is Israel.” That water stress has been a major factor in the turmoil tearing apart the Middle East, but Bar-Zeev believes that Israel’s solutions can help its parched neighbors, too — and in the process, bring together old enemies in common cause.

 

Tags: drought, water, environment, Israel, technology, Middle East.


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Susan Grice's curator insight, February 4, 2017 8:51 AM
GReat!
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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 5, 2017 5:03 PM
Geographic Concepts: Spatial Significance, Geographic Perspective
brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 4:16 PM
This connects to the physical geography of Israel as it was once incredibly dry, facing a decade long drought. This ruined the agriculture sector of their economy as well, along with changing the people's way of life. However, desalination has saved the country, and Israel really had no other choice. Instead, the country is now a water giant, and has an overabundance through new technologies. 
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Climate Migrants

Climate Migrants | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
Climate change has already displaced tens of thousands of people. If it continues unabated, it could lead to one of the largest mass human migrations in history.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 18, 2017 10:21 AM

This StoryMap shows some key regions where migrants are fleeing some of the negative impacts of climate change, a trend that appears very likely to increase in the future.  It is also an excellent example of the ESRI's new Cascade template for creating a web app. 

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastalmappingESRIStoryMap, visualization, environment depend, political ecology.

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Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion?

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ROCAFORT's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:14 AM
Human Population Through Time
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:23 PM
Pour la DNL seconde
 
Jordyn Reeves's curator insight, January 11, 2017 3:44 PM
This relates to our topic by showing that our population is growing rapidly. By the time 2025 there will be more than 11 billion people on the Earth. But we have enough resources to last us.
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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 21, 2016 8:11 AM

Looking for some Thanksgiving resources?  Here you go. 

 

Tags: Thanksgiving, food, seasonal.

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Surging Seas Interactive Map

Surging Seas Interactive Map | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
Global warming has raised global sea level about 8" since 1880, and the rate of rise is accelerating. Rising seas dramatically increase the odds of damaging floods from storm surges.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2016 1:27 PM

This interactive map from Climate Central dramatically shows what locations are most vulnerable to sea level rise.  You can adjust the map to display anywhere from 1 to 10 feet of sea level rise to compare the impact to coastal communities.  This dynamic map lets to view other layers to contextualize potential sea level rise by toggling on layers that include, population density, ethnicity, income, property and social vulnerability.   

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastalmapping, visualization, environment depend, political ecology.

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Live chart: Fish stocks

"The world's fish are in danger—as is everyone who depends on them."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 2016 3:19 PM

Every semester I share with my students this New York Times video about the rapid rise in industrial fishing and the production of Talapia.  Even with the rise of aquaculture as a major source of seafood, the world's oceans are still depleted.  As the world's population rises, many folk cultures with their roots in small fishing villages have transformed into primarily urban societies, but these urban societies still have a strong cultural preference for seafood and consume at levels that are not sustainable.    

 

Tags: environment modifyfolk culturesconsumption, water, physical.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 6, 2016 1:24 AM

Impact of overfishing and ecosystem disruption on marine environments 

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Coast Lines

Coast Lines | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
In the next century, sea levels are predicted to rise at unprecedented rates, causing flooding around the world, from the islands of Malaysia and the canals of Venice to the coasts of Florida and California. These rising water levels pose serious challenges to all aspects of coastal existence—chiefly economic, residential, and environmental—as well as to the cartographic definition and mapping of coasts. It is this facet of coastal life that Mark Monmonier tackles in Coast Lines. Setting sail on a journey across shifting landscapes, cartographic technology, and climate change, Monmonier reveals that coastlines are as much a set of ideas, assumptions, and societal beliefs as they are solid black lines on maps.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 15, 2016 3:39 PM

I haven't yet had the chance to look at this book, but it is currently being offered as a free e-book; I'm very excited to look it over.   

 

Tagsmappingcoastal, cartography, textbook.

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The driverless truck is coming, and it’s going to automate millions of jobs

The driverless truck is coming, and it’s going to automate millions of jobs | Agricultural literacy | Scoop.it
A convoy of self-driving trucks recently drove across Europe and arrived at the Port of Rotterdam. No technology will automate away more jobs -- or drive more..
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