Agile Learning
3.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Agile Learning
How learning and education is changing to meet our needs today and tomorrow.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Classic: Nassim N. Taleb and His Rules for Life. Who will break the status quo?

Classic:  Nassim N. Taleb and His Rules for Life.  Who will break the status quo? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"The controversial thinker who predicted the 2008 financial crisis hates bankers, academics and journalists. Carole Cadwalladr took the risk of meeting him."
 

"The controversial thinker who predicted the 2008 financial crisis hates bankers, academics and journalists. Carole Cadwalladr took the risk of meeting him."

    

In The Black Swan he argued that modernity is too complex to understand, and "Black Swan" events – hitherto unknown and unpredicted shocks – will always occur.
    
What's more, because of the complexity of the system, if one bank went down, they all would. The book sold 3m copies.  

        

Antifragile, the follow-up, is his most important work so far, he says. It takes the central idea of The Black Swan and expands it to encompass almost every other aspect of life, from the 19th century rise of the nation state to what to eat for breakfast (fresh air, as a general rule).

 I'd been expecting a popular science-style read, a Freakonomics or a Nudge. And then I realised it's actually a philosophical treatise.

     

"Exactly!" says Taleb. Once you get over the idea that you're reading some sort of popular economics book and realise that it's basically Nassim Taleb's Rules for Life, ...it's actually .....something like a chivalric code d'honneur for the 21st century. Modern life is akin to a chronic stress injury, he says. And the way to combat it is to embrace randomness in all its forms: live true to your principles, don't sell your soul and watch out for the carbohydrates.

       

Some of the gems of this journalistic piece:
      
"Experience is devoid of the cherry-picking that we find in studies."
     
 "You have to pull back and let the system destroy itself, and then come back. That's Seneca's recommendation. He's the one who says that the sage should let the republic destroy itself."

Size, in Taleb's view, matters. Bigger means more complex, means more prone to failure. Or, as he puts it, "fragile". It's what made – still makes – the banking system so vulnerable.
    
 In The Black Swan, one of Taleb's great examples of "non-linearity", or Black Swan behaviour, was blockbusters. There's no predicting what will be the next breakout success, or next year's 50 Shades of Grey, but when they take off, they fly off the charts, as The Black Swan did. The book itself was a Black Swan phenomenon. As Taleb is fond of pointing out – and as the small print beneath advertisements for mutual funds states – past performance is no indicator of future growth.

      

When the financial journalist Michael Lewis profiled a collection of individuals who, like Taleb, saw the crash coming and shorted the market, he described them as "social misfits". It takes a certain sort of personality to stand apart from the herd. And Taleb's cantankerousness, his propensity for picking fights, and for taking stands does also seem to be the source of his greatest triumphs. It was horrible, though, he says.
      

"Really horrible. Between 2004 and 2008 were the worst years of my life. Everybody thought I was an idiot. And I knew that. But at the same time I couldn't change my mind to fit in. So you have this dilemma: my behaviour isn't impacted by what people think of me, but I have the pain of it.
     

You must have felt incredibly vindicated?
      

"Vindication doesn't pay back. Nobody likes you because you were right. This is why I'm glad I made the shekels."
     

…Taleb is a fighter. And like the Roman generals, he believes in going into battle, leading from the front.
      

If you're going to make the case for war, you need to have at least one direct descendant who stands to lose his life from the decision.

      

….he gives good lunch. And he does something which no interviewee in the history of interviews has ever done – he pays. Whatever else he does or doesn't do, Nassim Taleb puts his money where his mouth is. He has skin in the game.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I discovered this gem recently.  Carole Cadwalladr does an excellent job of capturing the essence of the irascible Taleb, with a well written touch of poignancy.  I've become a fan of his ideas because of my own beliefs in the power of groups, teams and communities, and because we are due for many more "Black Swan" events due to the fragile nature of connected businesses.   

Technology is both a blessing and not.  I hope  there will be alternative forms of finance that will arise to solve the problems we've experienced since 2008, as well as what will continue to be a jobless recovery.  More about that soon.  ~  Deb 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Leaping Learning Lizards! Lanyrd integrates with LinkedIn

Leaping Learning Lizards!  Lanyrd integrates with LinkedIn | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Integration can be powerful.  This reverberates for many industries including learning, conferences as well as the professional speaking industies.

 

Excerpted:


Lanyrd now helps LinkedIn users discover conferences and professional events based on their LinkedIn connections and profile information.


This fills a gap left by the shutdown of LinkedIn's events application and allows event organizers to continue to take advantage of LinkedIn to promote their events.


LinkedIn users can also use Lanyrd to build their own speaker profiles, get event information on their mobile phones and network more effectively with others at events.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from The Social Media Learning Lab
Scoop.it!

Transliteracy : Constructing Knowledge and Networks, New trends, tech, terms

Transliteracy : Constructing Knowledge and Networks, New trends, tech, terms | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"This hot whiteboard illustration of the nuances of social media is going the distance.  After sharing it on Facebook & Pinterest, it now appears here in a new context, Transliteracy."


Librarians gathered together for a one-day conference on ARLD Day 2012 (27 April) in Minnesota to engage, discuss and connect on the theme “Transliteracy: Constructing Knowledge and Networks and more.


____________________________

   

“Transliteracy is the ability to communicate meaning between media. ...Transliteracy helps us promote literacy across technological barriers.”  

____________________________

     


Lane Wilkinson, Assistant Professor and reference and instruction librarian at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, advocated a new literacy taxonomy in his keynote presentation. Lane shared his views on "What is Transliteracy?


   

See the full presentation with slides & audio, via the original article link here.


Via Sue Thomas, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 24, 2012 3:08 PM
I shared this on Facebook & Pinterest, but it also belongs elsewhere too, obviously. Thanks for the inclusion.
Suggested by Frederic DOMON
Scoop.it!

The Stupid Company? Is Collective Intelligence a Myth? Call for papers: The #eCollab Blog Carnival

The Stupid Company?  Is Collective Intelligence a Myth?  Call for papers: The #eCollab Blog Carnival | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

In theory, everyone is for the learning organization or the mobilization of collective intelligence.   How could you be against it? Would that make you in favour of the "stupid organization"?


eCollab Blog Carnival post suggested by Frederic Domon. It looks like a great idea. ~ Deb


Few organizations have developed a model for a sustainable learning organization.


So, is collective intelligence a myth? What are the reasons for successive failures at attempts to implement the learning organization? How can this be fixed?

Please join us in this discussion!

If you wish to participate (2 choices):

Do you have a blog?


  • Respond with an article you publish on your blog. Send an email to fdomon (at) entreprisecollaborative.com or a tweet to @hjarche or @fdomon to make sure we do not forget your article.
 
 
  • If you use Twitter, send a message linked to your post using the hashtag #ecollab
  
  • We will publish all articles, or excerpts of them on the site. This will make for easier reading of the blog carnival. We will link to the original article and will contact you for a short bio and photo to include with the article
  


You do not have a blog but this interests you?

   

Send your article directly to fdomon (at) entreprisecollaborative.com. We will then publish it.
   

Good blog Carnival and thank you in advance for your participation. - Frederic Domon.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Management Resources
Scoop.it!

Strategic Agility? FLIP & use Smart Mobs to thrive in our VUCA world: Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous

Strategic Agility?  FLIP & use Smart Mobs to thrive in our VUCA world:  Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"If you stand still, you’ll fall behind in today’s VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous) world. Movement alone, however, doesn’t guarantee success." ~ Liz Guthridge


Great post by Liz!  On her blog, I commented that Liz speaks to a practical tool for VUCA preparedness so well, especially in cultivating a state of strategic agility, a big interest of mine this past year in assisting clients.


Liz is also doing some great things of interest to peer learners via her focus on smart mobs and crowdsourcing.  I've dipped my toe in the water in a parallel way to these practices via my experiences facilitating Open Space and Appreciative Inquiry and soon, my first UnConference.  All of these practices could be considered VUCA-friendly.


Excerpts:

.

By committing to FLIP (focus, listen, involve and personalize), you’re leading from wherever you are. And you’re serving as a role model to encourage others to be active, not passive, about your responsibilities.

.

With #3, INVOLVE, Liz talks about smart-mob organizing, bringing together groups of people for a common business challenge or social change.  This can easily include social media or other technology.

  • Liz is conducting a Best Practice Institute webinar on Change Through Crowdsourcing: How to Use Peer-by-Peer Practices to Transform Organizations on June 19 at 2 pm

.

With smart mobs, you can collaborate and cooperate in new, clever ways faster and more effective than ever before.

.

Rather than be content living with uncertainty and ambiguity in a VUCA world, you’re switching them around. You’re showing “agility” instead of “ambiguity” by seeking “understanding” instead of floundering in uncertainty.


Full post here.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead?

The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Is it really about teaching more, in less time, with shrinking budgets?  Or are we doing our brains & our bottom line a disservice, including conference event planning?"  


This is a great post on how to leverage learning that sticks, is sticky, vs. a spray and pray approach that still, unfortunately, dominates training programs and many conference events.


Here's an excerpt of this great post by 


Fresh thinking about how we learn
There are two kinds of learning. Learning physical tasks, like how to snowboard...embedded through repetition in the deeper motor regions of the brain such as the basal ganglia. This is known as procedural memory.


For workplace learning to be useful, we need to be able to recall ideas easily. 


In the last decade, Neuroscientists discovered that whether an idea can be easily recalled is linked to the strength of activation of the hippocampus during a learning task.


Many corporate training programs are the mental equivalent of trying to eat a week of meals in a day.


With this finding, scientists such as Lila Davachi at NYU and others have been able to test out many variables involved in learning experiences, such as what happens to the hippocampus if you distract people while absorbing information.


Over a few months of collaboration, Lila Davachi and I, along with Tobias Keifer, a consultant from Booz & Co., found a useful pattern that summarized the four biggest factors that determined the quality of recall. These are:

  • Attention, 
  • Generation, 
  • Emotion and 
  • Spacing, or the ‘AGES’ model. 

The AGES model was first presented at the 2010 NeuroLeadership Summit, and then published in the 2010 NeuroLeadership Journal. Read the full post including Learning that lasts through AGES that has a summary of this important research here.


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Content Curation World
Scoop.it!

Facebook Introduces Interest Lists, 'Your Own Personal Newspaper' | Search Engine Watch

Facebook Introduces Interest Lists, 'Your Own Personal Newspaper' | Search Engine Watch | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Facebook has announced the launch of Interest Lists, a new feature designed to help users curate the content of pages and public figures in which they’re interested."

 

Curation hits Facebook.  You can become the sorter of all that Facebook info to collect and group what is of interest to you.  All my fellow Facebook link posters, this includes you.

 

Excerpted:

 

Facebook new Interest Lists promises to deliver the top posts from each interest group (list) in the user’s newsfeed.

 

Over the coming weeks, users will see “Add Interests” appear in the left-hand sidebar on their newsfeed. Users can also create lists from “Create List” in the “Interests” page.

 

Interest lists can help you turn Facebook into your own personalized newspaper, with special sections—or feeds—for topics that matter to you. You can find traditional news sections like Business, Sports and Style or get much more personalized.

 

Interest Lists are, of course, similar in concept to Google+ Circles, though they are limited to curating content from public figures and Pages..."

 

Read full article here: http://j.mp/xmbXuO


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Robin Good
more...
Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, March 9, 2012 3:12 PM
Hi Robin,
this is my humble appreciation: You are the king of curation..and we learned by you!
Thanks for appreciation about our curated work!
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Social Media AND Social Learning, the Behavioral Difference | Education News

Social Media AND Social Learning, the Behavioral Difference | Education News | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Social media is the platform and social learning is the act.  

(paraphrased by me - dn)


Social learning... is the act of exchanging ideas, knowledge or information through social media means.


Marcia Conner and Tony Bingham, in The New Social Learning, define social learning as:

  • ...people becoming more informed, gaining a wider perspective, and 
  • being able to make better decisions by engaging with others.
  • ...acknowledg[ing] that learning happens with and through other people, 
  • a matter of participating in a community, 
  • not just by acquiring knowledge.


Social learning is a behavior. It is not a separate behavior outside of the overall learning spectrum, but one that is also relatively new. One cannot assume that by enlisting in a Facebook or Twitter account (social media examples) that the user will be able to socially learn.


Organizations not only need to help with the definition of learning, they need to provide the right opportunities to help their employees understand how to socially learn as well.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Pure Peer-to-Peer Learning: Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral

Pure Peer-to-Peer Learning:  Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"If we do this right, I'll learn more about facilitating others to self-organize learning."


Toward Peeragogy: the transformative power of high-end, peer-to-peer, global learning via the internet and social media.


From the author of a UC-Berkley post:


I've been invited to deliver the 2011 Regents' Lecture at University of California, Berkeley. I intend to expand the paragogy universe by instigating a peer-created guide to pure peer-to-peer learning. I'm calling it "peeragogy."


While "paragogy" is more etymologically correct, "peeragogy" is self-explanatory.


In my lecture, I'll explain the evolution of my own pedagogy and reveal some of what I've discovered in the world of online self-organized learning. Then I will invite volunteers to join me in a two week hybrid of face-to-face seminars and online discussion.


Can we self-organize our research, discover, summarize, and prioritize what is known through theory and practice, then propose, argue, and share a tentative resource guide for peeragogical groups?


In theory, those who use our guide to pursue their own explorations can edit the guide to reflect new learning.


It's not exactly a matter of making my own role of teacher obsolete. If we do this right, I'll learn more about facilitating others to self-organize learning.


This is the last in a very popular series. The previous three posts are: D.I.Y.U.: An Experiment, Pop Up U, and Learning Reimagined: Participatory, Peer, Global, Online.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

HR is ripe for social disruption. Peer sharing & learning within HR structures to support innovative organizations

HR is ripe for social disruption.  Peer sharing & learning within HR structures to support innovative organizations | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Is it finally Time for Social HR? What's out there that uses social systems to revitalize how people are recruited and learn, grow and develop within organizations?


If organizations tend to be hidebound against change, Human Resources (HR) is even more so, in spite of the trendy strategic HR spin of the early 2000's . Consider HR's roots, which persists: labor relations, compensation, employment/personnel and the number of lawyers on staff.


Here's some fresh thinking about injecting social into HR systems.


Excerpted, adapted:


Knowledge Sharing: Forget the idea of databases acting as “repositories” of knowledge, internal social networks can capture employees work activity as social intranets – and team members can follow what others are doing on their activity streams. Newer tools like Opzi and MindQuilt can also emerge as a enterprise version of Quora, the popular Q&A site.


Recruitment:  HR has been quick to leverage social media to “Broadcast” vacancies. The next level would be actively creating and nurturing communities of practice shaped around skills where hiring managers can gauge level of skills of people and also develop them (Disclaimer: The author works with BraveNewTalent, a platform that helps organizations do that)


HR policies: Using a social tool which leverages crowdsourcing ideas from employees can help HR in co-creating processes and policies – and raise acceptability when they are finally rolled out. Dell’s EmployeeStorm is a great example by which employees give ideas on everything in the company.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Peer & Social Learning Unconferences: The what, the why, the how

Bruce Eckel covers what Open Spaces are how they are run, and resolves many misconceptions about 'Unconferences'.  10 seconds into this video, and you'll see the first of the mechanics for how it works, as well as lessons that Bruce has learned in doing UnConferences.


Even though this video is titled, "Open Spaces" - it really is about running an Unconference, step-by-step, using Open Space concepts.  The two concepts are a bit different.


Open Space tends to be about developing actions as take aways focused around a central theme or issue.  It is not necessarily focused primarily on learning and exchange, although it CAN be, as I will be demonstrating in a learning & dialog focused 30 minute Open Space demonstration/learning event at a panel/open space combo event at our April, 2012 session for the Assn. for Change Management Practitioners in Las Vegas.


UnConferences are about learning and dialog, in an open, self-directed format where participants co-create & co-own the outcomes.  


Here's a collection of UnConference videos, interviews, and how-to resources that you might find useful, as deemed by my perspective as a facilitator and change strategist/organization development practitioner:


Two views of What is an UnConference?  Brief video


Show and tell, photos of an unconference in action.


Video I (part of a series) of healthcare & teamwork UnConference in action.


How to run a great UnConference session.


How to prepare to attend an UnConference, especially if you might be facilitating dialog in an UnConference session.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from The Social Media Learning Lab
Scoop.it!

Curation, Collection, Bookmarking: Does it Obscure Our Bias Toward Action? | ProfHacker & Chronicle of Higher Ed

Curation, Collection, Bookmarking: Does it Obscure Our Bias Toward Action? | ProfHacker &  Chronicle of Higher Ed | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

What are the actions, results that come from our collecting, referencing, bookmarking, and proliferations of social media profiles, blogs, channels and social empires?


This post refers to current tools, and probes our purpose in using them by asking questions I often ask in executive coaching or in just making a smart decision:

  • What's important?  
  • What really matters?


Excerpted:

...With the near omnipresence of digital reference material, many of us no longer turn first to our own collections. Yet we were trained, explicitly or implicitly, to collect and save large amounts of information.


In Scott Belky’s recent book Making Ideas Happen: Overcoming the Obstacles Between Vision and Reality, he argues that most people spend too much time collecting notes of various kinds, and goes so far as to say:


References obstruct your bias toward action.


Many times, we hold onto an email, the URL of a website, or the PDF of a journal article, as a kind of emblem of an action we intend to take...


If those actions are important, then they should be captured and put into your action list. Otherwise you’re just piling up digital clutter.


Tools like Evernote, Catch (formerly 3Banana) and DevonThink can help you tag, manage, and easily retrieve those references.)


If you just keep everything, then you lose sight of what’s most important.


Today, with so much information all around us, there’s less and less that you really need to keep yourself. Focus on the important stuff and let go of the rest.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Future Belongs to the Curious: A Manifesto - Not All who Wander are Lost

The Future Belongs to the Curious: A Manifesto - Not All who Wander are Lost | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

This reminds me that:

"not all who wander are lost."


Skillshare is sharing this manifesto under the banner of the transformative power of curiosity.  The blog post's video includes themes of lifelong learning and curiosity with a focus on early to middle life stages.  


Take a look and see what you think, if you are curious...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from A New Society, a new education!
Scoop.it!

"We help each other be expert." Social Media to learn, teach, research – Full Video

Difficult polymath problem?  "...The discussion would go until they solved the problem.   ...We are all experts...  We help each other be expert."

Autonomy, privacy, platforms, research, complexity, sharing incuding solving a complex math problem - solving problems collaboratively.


Video of the Cristina Costa session, Social Media for learning, teaching and researching at the University of Liverpool on 9th February 2012 - full video.


From the Univ. of Liverpool describing this session:


  • Cristina is the Learning and Research Technologies Manager at the University of Salford and was named the Learning Technologist of the year in 2010 (Association for Learning Technology). the seminar was for teachers-researchers who have heard of social media but do not have a great deal of experience with it.
   
  • Cristina challenged the approach to using the web ‘as a book’ – just as a place to go and ‘look things up’. 
   
  • She encouraged us to view the web as a place to set up challenges and inquiries for students, to use its social personal(ised) potential and overall to use the web to create.  To contribute not just to consume.  
   
  • The session was really well received, full of ideas and links to new practical choices.  


Related posts by Deb:  



     




Via MonVall, juandoming
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Cristina Costa covers many themes including the problems with using Facebook and what tools work better, and complex polymath problem solving through collaboration.  ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Living in An Interconnected Society - The Good, the Bad & the Potential, Tiffany Shlain

Tiffany Shlain, founder of the Webby Awards, through video illustrates today's interconnected society at The Economist's 2012 event in San Francisco.

  

_____________________________

   

As we become more connected, we'll be able to see the cause and effect of our actions in real time.

_____________________________



What does it mean to live in a connected world? How is it changing us, our culture and the planet?

 

Her film "Connected"  illustrates:

Technology is changing the way we connect with people around us.

 

We have accumulated so much knowledge, yet we have trouble seeing the bigger picture. Perhaps it is time to declare our interdependence.

 

_____________________________

   

It's the beginning of a participatory revolution.
_____________________________


Close to 2 billion people on-line with 5 billion cell phones. It's the beginning of a participatory revolution. Ideas are free to interact, cross pollinate, creating hybrid perspectives all over the world.

 

As we become more connected, we'll be able to see the cause and effect of our actions in real time. ...Once we understand the supply chains and see their results, we'll be more thoughtful about our behavior.

 

Tiffany Shlain favorite quote:  "Go as far as you can see and when you get there. you'll be able to see even further."

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Exploring Change and Ongoing Discussions"


Video here: [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRTnUKpDGWs]


Via janlgordon
more...
Ken Morrison's comment, August 17, 2012 9:38 AM
Thanks for sharing this. I took an online course from Howard Rheingold, who is in this film a few times.
Ken
Ken Morrison's comment, August 20, 2012 12:00 PM
Thank you for the rescoops. I really like this quote:
"Go as far as you can see and when you get there. you'll be able to see even farther"

Best of luck on your scoop.it site. I like what I see here.
Ken
Ken Morrison's comment, September 2, 2012 7:53 PM
Thank you for the rescoop. I really hope that this video project is successful for her organization.
Ken
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Scoop.it!

The Facebook Business Model, Really? University Courses, Build Now, Money Later

The Facebook Business Model, Really?  University Courses, Build Now, Money Later | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Usually glacially-paced universities are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later." Does this "Facebook" style strategy also mean, "Build fast and see who benefits later, as long as it includes the investors?"  


There is some controvery that access to free courses does not a degree make, and that, after all, this could be a grand marketing scheme with questionable motives. Degrees are still in demand as much as they ever were.

_____________________

   

"[It's] a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps ...so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit.  ~  Stacey Simmons

_____________________

    


"By denying qualified people (meaning those who have completed the work) access to degrees or some other endorsement, institutions are establishing a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps by which they might educate themselves so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit, and certainly never enter the world of the elite. ~ Stacey Simmons, one of Fast Companies "Most Creative People"





  

If you've seen the movie: The Social Network, you'll know that that using Facebook as a business model is not unknown to higher education. However something ununusual is happening in usually glacially-paced universities; they are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later."

   

Excerpted:    

   

Coursera is following an approach popular among Silicon Valley start-ups: Build fast and worry about money later. Venture capitalists—and even two universities—have invested more than $22-million in the effort already.

   

_____________________


   

...does it change their lives for the better?


_____________________

   


"Our VC's keep telling us that if you build a Web site that is changing the lives of millions of people, then the money will follow," says Daphne Koller, the company's other co-founder, who is also a professor at Stanford.

    

====


Deb: But, does it change their lives for the better?  Stanford, of course, had one of the first professors to jump ship to offer a large, free course to the world.  


  • Sebastian Thrun, an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford who invited the world to attend his fall semester artificial intelligence course and who ended up with 160,000 online students, announced he had decided to stop teaching at Stanford and direct all his teaching activities through Udacity, a start-up he co-founded that will offer online courses from leading professors to millions of students.


Stacey Simmons, CEO & Founder at Omnicademy, questions the motivation (Free is Not Liberated...) of offering free courses if degrees from prestigious institutions are not accessible to the many.  On the other hand, it could be an amazing new education model, per her TED conversation here.

     
    
My own alma mater, University of Michigan, has been among the first to invest.

Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education, How an Upstart Company Might Profit from Free Courses

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Inquiry Building Blocks for Your Informal Learning Strategy

Inquiry Building Blocks for Your Informal Learning Strategy | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

What does analysis look like for informal learning? Is it different because it involves technology?  Not really - via Intrepid Learning.


It's useful to look at these data gathering steps as a possible checklist for creating the conditions to facilitate informal learning in your organization.  DPPE is a model I like to use:  Data, Purpose, Plan, Evaluate.  This fits right into the planning flow.  ~  Deb


Excerpted:


Analysis for informal learning: Here are a few actions you can take to assess the learner’s needs.


  • Spend time with the learner group in their environment, understand how they go about conducting their work, and look at how they fill learning gaps
.
  • Assess where and when they need the support of others because information is not readily available
.
  • Conduct interviews, ask questions to gain understanding of their needs
.
  • Craft a user story – a “day in the life of” – and vet that with the learner group
.
  • Use focus groups to gain insights including having them walk you through their work processes
.
  • Brainstorm with the learner group to identify where they think informal learning might help them accomplish tasks more easily or to provide context 
.

Once you gain an understanding of their needs for information, support, and learning within their workflow, you can prepare for the next step in building your informal learning strategy.


Read the full article here.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue

The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"We've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example."


HBR has a new issue out this month, April 2012 on teams.  In my LinkedIn review of what's new, I see that there may be some updates to the team models and traditions of the likes of Belbin, Tuckman, Gibb-Dannemiller and crew.


Excerpted from a pre-publication blog post by Alex "Sandy" Pentland:


"...I've encountered teams that are "clicking." I've experienced the "buzz" of a group that's blazing away with new ideas in a way that makes it seem they can read each others' minds."


____________________________


How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions.

____________________________


MIT's Human Dynamics Laboratory used wearable electronic sensors to capture how people communicate in real time.  Not only did they determine the characteristics that make up great teams, but they also described those characteristics mathematically. 


What's more, we've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example.


Our data show that great teams:


Communicate frequently. In a typical project team a dozen or so communication exchanges per working hour may turn out to be optimum; but more or less than that and team performance can decline.


Talk and listen in equal measure, equally among members. Lower performing teams have dominant members, teams within teams, and members who talk or listen but don't do both.


Engage in frequent informal communication. The best teams spend about half their time communicating outside of formal meetings or as "asides" during team meetings, and increasing opportunities for informal communication tends to increase team performance.


Explore for ideas and information outside the group. The best teams periodically connect with many different outside sources and bring what they learn back to the team.


You'll notice that none of the factors outlined above concern the substance of a team's communication. 


...According to our data, it's as true for humans as for bees: How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions. The old adage that it's not what you say, but how you say it, turns out to be mathematically correct.


Read the full blog post, The Hard Science of Teamwork, here.



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

De-Mystifying Khan Academy: Screen Capture for Educators

De-Mystifying Khan Academy: Screen Capture for Educators | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Info & a video about free & for fee whiteboard screencasting tools -  all the rage for creating educational videos like those featured in the Khan Academy."


Here's a few excerpts, adapted:


The Khan Academy website provides a FAQ that lists the tools that Salman Khan uses to create his videos:


  • Camtasia Recorder/Studio ($200)
  • ScreenVideoRecorder ($20)
  • SmoothDraw 3 (Free)
  • Microsoft Paint (Free)
  • Wacom Bamboo Tablet ($80)


There are three basic types of tools needed to do a whiteboard screencast:

  • a video screen recorder, 
  • a drawing program, and 
  • an input device. 


The basic concept is very simple: you plan your lesson, then record what you draw using the drawing program and your narration with the video screen capture program.



The input device (use a graphics tablet for best results) allows you to draw or write on a tablet rather than trying to use the mouse.


iPad Video Capture: For those interested in capturing the action on an iPad 2 or 3, this helpful video from MacMost Now will explain how.


====


I'd like to try this for instructional video soon.  Have any of our readers done this on the iPad?  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Content Curation World
Scoop.it!

Organizing and Curating Content is one of the Best Ways To Learn on a Subject

Organizing and Curating Content is one of the Best Ways To Learn on a Subject | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"There is no better way to learn something than to research, organize and build a personal framework of information, facts, resources, tools and stories around it," says Sam Gliksman.

 

And from Robin Good:

 

Curation can therefore be a revolutionary concept applicable both to learners and their approach as well as to the new "teachers" who need to become trusted guides in specific areas of interest.

 

Robin selected several excerpts to illustrate from Gliksman's post:

 

  • Reliance on any type of course textbook – digital, multimedia, interactive or otherwise – only fits as a more marginal element in student-centered learning models.
  • Lifelong learners need to be skilled in finding, filtering, collating, evaluating, collaborating, editing, analyzing and utilizing information from a multitude of sources.
  • Textbooks are an important gateway - a starting point ...we should encourage the “critical reading” of textbooks)
As a process consultant and facilitator of groups, this quote especially caught my eye:

 

  • ...the process of accessing, synthesizing and utilizing information is often as important as the product.

The full article is here.


Via Robin Good
more...
Robin Good's comment, March 3, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you for being so kind. I am happy to see this resonates with your experience too.
janlgordon's comment, March 3, 2012 5:37 PM
This is another great piece and it certainly resonates with me, thanks for sharing this Robin.
Steven Verjans's curator insight, December 11, 2012 7:19 PM

Not to mention that it's the first step towards research as well.

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Collaboration Culture Behaviors needed. Does it = Chief Collaboration Officer New Role ?

Collaboration Culture Behaviors needed.  Does it = Chief Collaboration Officer New Role ? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"As businesses become social businesses, collaboration and community skills are becoming the new workplace skills."


This post recalled one of the structural questions I like to consider in organization design:  how changing roles, goals procedures & relationships will foster collaborative culture through encouraging and supporting new skills.


Excerpts:


[Consider what roles would] help identify what “good” collaboration behaviour might look like within [your] organisation, and ...help to build an effective collaboration culture.


[A chief collaboration officer] will need:

  • to have a good understanding of the business, business processes and business strategy – not just learning theory
  • to appreciate that organizational learning involves more than just training people and that collaborative (or social) learning is a fundamental and natural part of doing social business.
  • a good knowledge of social and collaborative tools, and recognise that the primary collaboration platform in the organisation will be the one that underpins the work, ie some form of social intranet – but not a learning platform or system.
  • to believe that fostering a collaborative culture needs to be achieved by “modeling behaviours” - rather than training and testing competencies in order for workers to obtain their “collaboration license” before they are allowed on the network.

...developing collaborative skills will require an ongoing, adaptive, organic “modeling” process – not a one-off training event.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from A New Society, a new education!
Scoop.it!

Pinterest THIS, Curators: How McLuhan, Agel, and Fiore Created a New Visual Vernacular

Pinterest THIS, Curators:  How McLuhan, Agel, and Fiore Created a New Visual Vernacular | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Pinterest THIS!  It's an opportunity to channel your connect-the-dots ability into absorbing this prescient piece from Brain Pickings.

 

It may strike you as sophisticated & illuminating  or wandering and confusing, depending on how it grabs your favorites or introduces you to unknown history.  

 

Some excerpted nuggets:

"...contemporary visual culture:  the convergence of highbrow and lowbrow, the vernacular of advertising, the dynamics of newspaper and magazine publishing, the creation of avant-garde mass culture, and a wealth in between."

 

"The purpose of this inventory is to draw a circle around a body of objects; to take stock of their common properties; and to tell a story about where they came from, what they were, and where they led.

 

Their variety is such as to sustain a multiplicity of narrative threads: about

  • the rise of a new photo-driven graphic vernacular;  
  • the triumph of a certain cognitive/cultural style;  
  • criss-crossing between high and low,  
  • erudite and the mass cultural;  
  • the shifting boundaries between books, magazines, music, television, and film.” 
.

Referred:  for the Information Age via @piscitelli


Via juandoming
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from The Social Media Learning Lab
Scoop.it!

Pinterest Drives More Traffic Than Google+, YouTube and LinkedIn Combined [STUDY]

Pinterest Drives More Traffic Than Google+, YouTube and LinkedIn Combined [STUDY] | Agile Learning | Scoop.it
Pinterest now beats YouTube, Reddit, Google+, LinkedIn and MySpace for percentage of total referral traffic in January.


Wow!  Pinterest is growing like gangbusters, like an 8000% increase, (another Pinterest post in my Peer/Social Learning & Curation stream here.)   It remains to be seen what that means for the company and it's sustainability.


  • Pinterest has pulled quite a bit of attention away from Facebook. From Oct. 2010 to Oct. 2011, the site grew from 40,000 to 3.2 million monthly unique visitors.  That’s 8,000%.   Source:  All Techie News


Excerpts from Mashable:


The darling network of brides-to-be, fashionistas and budding bakers now beats YouTube, Reddit, Google+, LinkedIn and MySpace for percentage of total referral traffic in January, according to a Shareaholic study.


Pinterest accounted for 3.6% of referral traffic, while Twitter just barely edged ahead of the newcomer, accounting for 3.61% of referral traffic. In July 2011, Pinterest accounted for just 0.17% of referral traffic, proving the site’s blockbuster growth.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Pinterest is Taking Curation to a Whole New Level - Here's Why

Pinterest is Taking Curation to a Whole New Level - Here's Why | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Networks, people and business continues to intertwine themselves gently and fiercely, especially on Pinterest.  People don't want brands in their face, except for, perhaps, a favored few.  That may be enough for Pinterest.

.

I use ScoopIt for business & Pinterest for fun / people networks.  Check out my own boards on Pinterest and find out why, along with the review of Pinterest's success below.  


Also, my low-carb chocolate cake Pinterest referral link is here.

 .

Excerpts:

  • Pinterest has pulled quite a bit of attention away from Facebook.   From Oct. 2010 to Oct. 2011, the site grew from 40,000 to 3.2 million monthly unique visitors. That’s 8,000%. 
.

Pinterest curation in action:

  • Pinterest leverages web content from Tumblr like no site that has ever existed, thus riding on top of its network-effect while not requiring user generated content like many services.
  • They've also perfected in-network virality (pin, repin, like) in addition to out of network sharing (Facebook, Twitter) to grow virally.
  • For these reasons Pinterest could conceivable be the most successful site of its kind in the future.
  • Pinterest is [planning to] threatening to monetize, as those Midwest housewives are literally using it for shopping discovery, which Pinterest can profit off of by taking attribution for purchases that originate off its platform.
  • Several people have purchased stuff spontaneously via random discovery on the site.
.

Pinterest should be thriving a year from now .  The author suggests 30 million users next Thanksgiving - and spawning hundreds of copycat startups in other verticals.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/ysH3kI]  from AllTechie News


Via janlgordon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Curation & Blogging, Business Lessons Learned & Curator Prescience, 2012

A choice in social media for business today is blogging or curation, or some of both, or developing a hybrid. How do you make smart choices among traditional and the newest social media tools?


Curation to deal with Social Media Overload:  It's a theme in my new, tailored video presented this month to the local Lunch Ann Arbor Marketing, @LA2M group, focusing on the differences between blogging and curation.


Curation is not filtering, it's not aggregating, it's functioning as a librarian of current and classic content, which allows others into the curation process curate with you, to help avoid "filter bubble" syndrome (I've blogged & have a Move.on video on the subject.)  ScoopIt enables the co-creation curation function as one of the newer curation platforms out there.


I also mention in my video, both Beth Kanter, a respected blogger in non-profit circles, and Robin Good, who was just interviewed by Beth.  This seems to be a prescient convergence to me.


LA2M also archives most of their presentation, so my presentation partner, JT, has his slides and our UStream video archived here, so you can access our combined, recent curationg presentation.


What do you think about curation?  What are your questions?



~ Deb


more...
No comment yet.