Afrodizziak
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Afrodizziak
Contemporary African design
Curated by Susan Myburgh
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UN, EU push to harness refugees’ entrepreneurial talent

UN, EU push to harness refugees’ entrepreneurial talent | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
Migrants can offer the determination and resilience needed to form successful businesses...
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Ugo Mozie On African Youth As The Future

Ugo Mozie On African Youth As The Future | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
Ugo Mozie is a leading force in fashion and entertainment He is the embodiment of a man who has kept his Nigerian origins a part of the narrative while simultaneously highlighting the huge potential of his people.
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“I Wanted to Make Art that Told a Story”: Alison Saar on Her Eloquent Sculptures

“I Wanted to Make Art that Told a Story”: Alison Saar on Her Eloquent Sculptures | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
At her home and studio, Saar elaborates on her powerfully direct stories, particularly as they pertain to the African American experience.
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We have Launched a design company to help African Startups build world class products

Lupark, is a creative park of designers, developers and strategists based in Lagos Nigeria. We help brands increase their value and impact thorough branding and good design and compelling experience.” We launch today and we are set to help African startups build world class products. There is no doubt that startup and small businesses are very import to our growth as a continent which is why we want to help them accurately interpret their brand promise, message and solution. We have growing number of startups in Africa, yet we lack adequate creative teams to aid in building world class products. In cases where these african startups are able to employ the services of a good designer, the design teams are still not enough to go round for startups and small business owners as all the best designers would rather freelance for international clients and startups. In recent years, the number of Micro, Small and Medium enterprises in Nigeria has been on the rise. In 2010, SMEs totaled 17.2 million, which doubled in 2013 by a 100% at 37 million. This sum has since then multiplied, as even more entrepreneurs have continued to spring up in the West African Nation. “An effective design generally has a positive effect on sales, and this is what Lupark offers when you do business with us” It is from this need that Lupark is conceived; to provide commendable marketing strategy, brand voice, and visual identity for startups, so as to solidify their scalability existence in business. It’s not just another design, website, or product with us. It’s the future of your business that becomes our focus. Guess what, we’re hiring! Ready to begin your next project?  Simply say Hello@lupark.co or call us on +2349039954475  Visit our brand new website: www.lupark.co
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CURATOR’S TALK | After the Thrill is Gone: Fashion, Politics and Culture in Contemporary South African Art Tickets

CURATOR’S TALK | After the Thrill is Gone: Fashion, Politics and Culture in Contemporary South African Art Tickets | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
CURATOR’S TALK | After the Thrill is Gone: Fashion, Politics and Culture in Contemporary South African Art IMAGE: Kudzani Chiurai, Revelations IX, 2011, Courtesy of the artist and Goodman Gallery Join us for a conversation with Andrew Hennlich, curator of After the Thrill is Gone: Fashion, Politics and Culture in Contemporary South African Art and David Anthony III, Assistant Professor of History at UC Santa Cruz. The discussion between Anthony and Hennlich will consider the historical and social condition of post-apartheid South Africa, the visual iconography explored in After the Thrill is Gone, and the exhibition’s relevance and relationship to wider historical and political issues within the African diaspora. This program will include a wine reception Andrew Hennlich is Assistant Professor of Art History at the Gwen Frostic School of Art at Western Michigan University and a Research Associate at the Visual Identities in Art and Design Research Centre at the University of Johannesburg. He has published widely on memory, politics, immigration, identity, and temporality in contemporary South African art, writing on artists including Athi-Patra Ruga, Dan Halter, William Kentridge, Avant Car Guard, Julia Rosa Clark, Haroon Gunn-Salie and Pierre Fouché for various edited anthologies, exhibition catalogs, and journals including esse, Safundi, and Image & Text (Pretoria, South Africa). Hennlich’s current research projects include two in-progress book manuscripts: (un)Fixing the Eye William Kentridge and the Optics of Witness andSpace Invaders: the Work of Art in an Age of Statelessness. He is also developing an exhibition entitled Giving Offense: Arresting Rudeness and National Identity After 1989. David H. Anthony, III is Professor of African History at UC Santa Cruz. He focuses on intersections between culture and society in Africa’s Atlantic and Indian Ocean World Diasporas. His research interests include African and African-American history, art, music, literature and cinema; eastern and southern Africa; African Languages; Indian Ocean wold; African and African American linkages; Islamic civilization; African diaspora studies; and world history. Journals of publication include African Studies Review, Social Sciences and Mission, Journal of Religion In Africa, Journal of Anglican Studies, among others. Anthony authored Max Yergan: Race Man, Internationalist, Cold Warrior (New York: New York University Press, 2006) starting on 2018-03-28 18:30:00 Address: Museum of the African Diaspora 685 Mission Street 94105 San Francisco United StatesSVDG in Santa Cruz 9251 Road Warriors By RussellReno on 2010-04-10 18:30:45
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BBC - Culture - The ‘invisible’ artists of Africa

BBC - Culture - The ‘invisible’ artists of Africa | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
Beneath a crescent moon hanging like a disembodied smile in the dark sky, a petite woman dressed in white, with long silvery dreadlocks and ballet pumps on delicate feet, is dancing in Jemaa el-Fnaa, a vast square inside the pink-walled medina of Marrakesh. One moment she pirouettes slowly, seemingly lost in her own thoughts; the next, she moves vigorously, even provocatively, in the manner of a sexy dancer in a hip-hop video. For a few seconds, she even lies down with her arms across her chest, appearing briefly like a corpse about to be wrapped in a shroud. The generally festive atmosphere – a kind of perpetual, almost dumbfounding delirium – is thrilling In a sense, this beguiling performer – accompanied by four black-clad male backing dancers – fits in among the spectacle that is Marrakesh’s principal market place by night. Elsewhere, crowds of onlookers in pointy-hooded djellabas gather to listen to storytellers and traditional Berber musicians, watch snake-charmers, magicians, acrobats and jugglers, and cheer on impromptu boxing matches. The generally festive atmosphere – a kind of perpetual, almost dumbfounding delirium – is thrilling. Our dancer, though, isn’t a Moroccan street-entertainer, but Ghanaian performance artist Elisabeth Efua Sutherland, who fuses traditional Ghanaian dance with contemporary choreography. Sutherland’s exhilarating performance has been mounted in collaboration with Gallery 1957 (Ghana) and 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair, which has been going since 2013, first in London and then New York, but is now setting up shop for the first time in Marrakesh. Her dance also marks the official opening of the Museum of African Contemporary Art Al Maaden (MACAAL), a new independent, not-for-profit contemporary art museum, situated four miles southeast of the old city. - Secrets of Girl with a Pearl Earring - The racist message hidden in a masterpiece - The artists who shocked Europe “Africa is the future,” MACAAL’s president Othman Lazraq tells me, when I visit the museum. The son of a Moroccan property magnate, Lazraq, 29, who was born in Marrakesh, is a charismatic presence with a passion for contemporary African art. “Artists here are building a new way of art,” he continues. “At last, Africa has a proper voice.” The energy of the continent’s principal art-producing centres – Accra and Lagos, Cape Town and Johannesburg – persuaded him that the time was right to open a museum devoted to contemporary African art: “I want to give all these incredible artists a voice,” he explains, “not in Europe or America, but here in Africa, their home.” To celebrate MACAAL’s international launch, Lazraq has curated an exhibition showcasing highlights of his family’s collection by established African masters such as the 74-year-old Ghanaian sculptor El Anatsui and the Malian textile-based artist Abdoulaye Konaté, 65, who is represented by the international commercial gallery Blain Southern. In the spotlight Lazraq is also keen, though, to promote “emerging” and “invisible” artists. So, for the opening, he invited Afrique in Visu, a “participative platform” for photography created in Mali in 2006, to curate Africa Is No Island, an exhibition of more than 40 photographers, demonstrating the scope and quality of African photography today. “If anything links these photographers,” Lazraq explains, “it is their diversity. A lot of people still think of Africa as a kind of block, with no boundaries. But, of course, Africa is made up of 54 countries, with all their differences, traditions, and customs. This is something we reflect.” Certainly, the show is full of breathtakingly varied work, including Swiss-Guinean Namsa Leuba’s arresting pictures of solitary figures in natural settings, wrapped in odd, outlandish costumes, which fuse the visual language of fashion photography with the iconography of sacred Guinean statuettes. Elsewhere, there are photographs documenting the effects of migration and environmental catastrophe, as well as everyday life. Italian-born Nicola Lo Calzo presents an unforgettable image of a voodoo priestess in Benin. Sitting before a mural of a lion, like a visual manifestation of her strength, she fixes the camera with a hard-as-nails stare while exhaling a dense ball of white smoke, as a slender cigarette dangles nonchalantly from her lips. Several artists, such as 22-year-old, Paris-born Walid Layadi-Marfouk, who grew up between the French capital and Marrakesh, but now lives in New York, explicitly challenge negative stereotypes about life in Africa. Shot in Marrakesh, his series Riad, featuring intimate yet theatrical tableaux set inside a traditional family riad, was inspired by memories of his own childhood – as well as frustration about the representation of Muslim culture in Western media, which, he says, seldom reflected his own memories and sense of identity. “I was only seeing black-and-white images representing pain, submission, extremism,” he tells me. “Usually, they were set in the desert. You would never see a woman’s face. I wanted to attack all that.” You still hear the same old narrative: that Africa is poor, its people are starving and unhappy, everyone wants to go abroad to live in Europe – Joana Choumali The 43-year-old Ivorian artist Joana Choumali, who, at MACAAL, is showing two beautiful portraits from her series Hââbré, focusing on migrants from Nigeria and Burkina Faso with scarified faces in her hometown of Abidjan, is also conscious of lingering prejudices concerning Africa. “You still hear the same old narrative: that Africa is poor, its people are starving and unhappy, everyone wants to go abroad to live in Europe,” she says, while sipping sweet mint tea. “This is part of the story, but it isn’t the whole story.” She smiles. “Me, for example: I am happy to live in Africa. I want to stay in Abidjan.” Untold stories Choumali, who studied art in Casablanca, regrets the fact that indigenous African culture was rarely celebrated when she was young: “We were fed by other cultures, and the local culture was not promoted enough,” she says. “But the world is opening to other cultures, and Africa is so rich: there are so many unexplored stories.” She pauses. “Now is the time for African artists to tell them.” How does she feel, though, about being labelled an “African” artist? Given the size of the continent, isn’t the notion inherently absurd? “That’s a tricky question,” she replies, “because I am proud to be African. I’ve lived all my life in Ivory Coast, so my identity is Ivorian. But if you ask me, ‘Are you an African artist?’, I would say, I am an artist who lives in Africa, who happens to be African.” “Of course, being categorised as ‘African’ isn’t very interesting for artists,” says Touria El Glaoui, founding director of the 1-54 art fair. “But I think they also recognise the usefulness of the label in getting the visibility they deserve.” El Glaoui says that her primary motive for initiating 1-54 was “to give visibility to African artists and artists from the diaspora”. While a lot has changed since she founded the fair almost a decade ago – when, El Glaoui says, “African artists were simply not present in the international art scene” – there is still a long way to go. Even today, when she mounts the fair in London and New York, she encounters surprise: “People discovering the fair for the first time often go, ‘Oh, my God, I had no idea there was contemporary art in Africa.’ Perhaps they still have preconceived ideas of civil war. But it’s a booming economy now, with so much development.” She smiles. “If people with a negative view of Africa could experience what I experience when travelling on the continent, they would be amazed.” Alastair Sooke is art critic and columnist of The Daily Telegraph If you would like to comment on this story or anything else you have seen on BBC Culture, head over to our Facebook page or message us on Twitter. And if you liked this story, sign up for the weekly bbc.com features newsletter, called “If You Only Read 6 Things This Week”. A handpicked selection of stories from BBC Future, Earth, Culture, Capital, Travel and Autos, delivered to your inbox every Friday.
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African women photographers illuminate African narratives in Ghanian Exhibition

African women photographers illuminate African narratives in Ghanian Exhibition | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
The Nubuke Foundation, a gallery and arts foundation located in East Legon, a suburb of Accra, Ghana, transformed the walls of its exhibition space into a shrine for African women photographers who tell their stories through a unique lens...
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Two Projects Helping Female Artists in Africa Find Their Voices - The New York Times

Two Projects Helping Female Artists in Africa Find Their Voices - The New York Times | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
African women face cultural and financial resistance to careers in art, but a Johannesburg residency and an international art fair in Brooklyn may help them succeed.
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'Decolonize This Place' Protesters Disrupt Brooklyn Museum, Condemn 'Imperial Plunder'

'Decolonize This Place' Protesters Disrupt Brooklyn Museum, Condemn 'Imperial Plunder' | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
'This museum houses collections obtained through imperial plunder. Diverse programming is not enough!'...
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Here's Some Of The Incredible Art That's Coming From Africa Today

Here's Some Of The Incredible Art That's Coming From Africa Today | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
"It really is important to not just see contemporary art through the Western canon, but to allow for diversity and inclusion."...
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V&A · KpaKpaKpa: Design Concepts from the African Continent

V&A · KpaKpaKpa: Design Concepts from the African Continent | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
Celebrating the 3-year AfridesignX research project...
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Congo’s Talented Artists Struggle for Recognition

Congo’s Talented Artists Struggle for Recognition | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
With limited resources, young Congolese artists dream big...
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Few women assert themselves in the arts - Federal Foreign Office

Few women assert themselves in the arts - Federal Foreign Office | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
In the Congo, the art scene is largely dominated by men. The project Kinshasa 2050: Les femmes d’abord aims to empower female artists to have confidence in their ideas and to develop and present their own projects.
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World Service - Business Daily, Rebranding Africa

World Service - Business Daily, Rebranding Africa | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
African companies don’t have the same profile as western brands, even at home. How come?...
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eLearning Africa 2018 - Rwanda

eLearning Africa 2018, organized by ICWE GmbH and the Rwanda Convention Bureau, will be held in Kigali, Rwanda, on 26-28 September.
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Five Things About Mellon’s Support of Arts and Scholarship in South Africa | The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Five Things About Mellon’s Support of Arts and Scholarship in South Africa | The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
The Mellon Foundation has been making grants to South African universities since 1988. Thirty years later, we look back at the experience and how it informs future grantmaking....
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British designer, Stella McCartney causes outrage with her expensive African print wear

British designer, Stella McCartney causes outrage with her expensive African print wear | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
The fear of many African fashion connoisseurs is coming to pass as big designers increasingly incorporate African fabrics and designs in their collections. So are these big designers ‘stealing’ from Africans?
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Meet the Nigerian designer weaving African textiles with Renaissance art—including some of Black…

Walé Oyéjidé’s unique designs merge and meld the aesthetics of vibrant African textiles and the art of Renaissance Europe with the design traditions of European haute couture — creating wearable art…...
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CONNECTING KENYAN CONSUMERS WITH AFRICAN ARTISANS | Fjord

CONNECTING KENYAN CONSUMERS WITH AFRICAN ARTISANS | Fjord | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
Co-creating solutions Within a 10-day visit to Kenya, we went to Nairobi to immerse ourselves in East African culture, conduct customer research and run a Fjord Rumble (a highly structured, disciplined brainstorm format designed to create qualified ideas). Together with a mix of customers, Lynk employees and founders, we co-created four customer journeys and 38 high-level concept ideas. On day five, we synthesized our findings, leading to five design principles and nine key concepts. Alongside Accenture Strategy, we presented the concepts to the Lynk leadership team, who prioritized seven of them to go into prototyping back in the Fjord Copenhagen studio. Multi-disciplinary teamwork We used the full might of the Accenture Strategy and Fjord collaboration for this project. Fjord’s user-centric perspective is ideal for designing a solution that the local customers want and love, while Accenture Strategy provides the structured and analytical thinking to design the value chain that underpins the service. The need for speed In an uncertain market situation, like the one we were working with, it’s crucial to work fast. We used an Agile approach to experiment, test, learn, measure and iterate. We designed four different versions of the prototype and ran three customer tests. In this process, we were able to validate assumptions with strategic and operational impact, that have specific importance to both Kenyan and expat customers. We worked on customer research, prototyping and user testing in parallel with explorations of the market perspective and operational framework. This enabled us to quickly gain a holistic understanding that equipped us to make strategic decisions and implement them. We used design as a product driver to build fast and test fast before developing the actual product, which saved us valuable time. We worked to the adage: “Make sure you are building the right ‘it’ before you build ‘it’ right.”
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JCU Africans in the World Cultural Club Presents African Art Gallery

JCU Africans in the World Cultural Club Presents African Art Gallery | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
The Africans in the World Cultural Club hosted its first African Art Gallery event at John Cabot University on Thursday, April 12, 2018.
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African Design Magazine ADM #39 April 2018 - Page 10

African Design Magazine ADM #39 April 2018 - Page 10 | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
African Design Magazine’s primary focus is to deliver expert content which is engaging, fresh and relevant to Africa’s design professionals. Through our live interactive platforms, we encourage our readers and advertisers to network and actively engage in insightful conversation on aspects of...
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4 Works of Art You Need To See at the New York Edition of 1-54 Contemporary African Fair

4 Works of Art You Need To See at the New York Edition of 1-54 Contemporary African Fair | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
If you're in New York, you need to check out these four must-see works of art at 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair this weekend.
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8 African Art Events You Need To See In NYC This May

8 African Art Events You Need To See In NYC This May | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
OkayAfrica's guide to African art in New York City this month.
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It's All Done with Computers: Why African Artists are Embracing Digital Art Software | MenStuff

It's All Done with Computers: Why African Artists are Embracing Digital Art Software | MenStuff | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
Here's how African artists are harnessing the future.
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Accra’s African By Design Platform Strives To...

Accra’s African By Design Platform Strives To... | Afrodizziak | Scoop.it
Accra’s African By Design Platform Strives To Promote Regional Talent            Launched in Ghana in March 2017, AFRICA BY DESIGN is a new platform that focuses on, nurtures and promotes African design talent with the sector’s long-term development in mind                                                 Chrissa Amuah, founding director of AFRICA BY DESIGN (ABD), explains that it works to showcase the best of African talent, celebrating creativity, skills and craftsmanship. As the world, and the continent itself, hones in on the diversity of African cultural production, there is a significant conversation arising about design across Africa and its potential for boosting the economy and providing sustainable livings. “Each country has amazing talent, doing incredible things, and there are hotspots which are evolving and growing,” she shares. “Exciting things are happening in Accra, Ghana, and the same can be said for Dakar, Senegal, and Lagos, Nigeria, too. If we are to consider the industrialisation of design across the continent then we must look to Ethiopia, who is fast setting the blueprint for the continent to learn and grow from.” This platform – which had “an empowering symbolism given the launch date coincided with the anniversary of Ghana’s independence from colonial rule” – is ready to dig deep.
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