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West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    


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8A JonathanS's curator insight, February 16, 2017 7:55 AM
This article and YouTube clip is talking about the child labor and modern slavery going on in West Africa. These regions are mostly used for cocoa bean plantations and harvesting. The guy leading this investigation also interviews people who are in charge of the chocolate making factories and asks them where the cocoa beans come from. Almost everyone answers, "the Ivory Coast" and have no idea what so ever what is actually going on there. They just order the amount of beans needed and have no clue what children have to go through to provide these people what they need. In this documentary they also interview some of the children having to go through this and it's very terrible and wrong. These children get taken away from their homes to work and get tricked that they're getting payed even though they don't get anything for all they do. In this clip I also get to see what the owners of the cocoa bean plantations say about what's going on and all the lies are just so silly and I cant believe what their thinking and why they're doing this.

This article connects a lot to what we've been working with in class. We even saw this movie about cocoa farms spread all over Wast Africa and this movie basically talked about the same things the other movie talked about. I enjoyed this movie a lot. Even though the information given was very sad and heart breaking I learned a lot of new things about the conditions of these slaves and and what they actually have to go through to please their "master" and how sad their lives are. When seeing this movie I just felt so bad and I just feel like I want to help these people so much.  
Ping Ping W's curator insight, February 15, 11:33 PM

“Although slavery is no longer legal, there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa…”  Even though cocoa drinks are very delicious, have you ever stop to consider where how and who collected them? Here’s how they do it: slavery. It is still very common on cocoa plantations in West Africa. Children are smuggled from all over Africa (Mali, Niger, Burkina Faso, etc), then, they are placed on remote, isolated plantations. Also, thirty-five percent of world’s chocolate is produced by slave labour.

 

This helped me better understand Africa by informing me about how children were kidnapped and force to work...some children work at such a young age too. Before doing this research, I didn’t know how Cocoa even came to be! However, now that I know that children slavery was how cocoa was produced, it made me wonder if the factory knew? All the factory that bought their cocoa from Africa, do they know this is how they’re getting their products? And if they do, why don’t they do anything to stop children slavery or pay the workers at least? I think that cocoa factories in Africa must have really low budgets, or else they wouldn’t be kidnapping kids or adults to do the work in the form of modern slavery (without paying them too). 

Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, June 23, 11:32 AM

The youth are not the only ones that have history and could improve or do things better or just in different way but the older generation also have our cross to bare. As this article i must admit put the fact that not everything that is seen as good come from good reasonings as chacolate is not seen as sinful when we purchase it from the store but to know that atleast some of it got its original origin from thd blood sweat and tears of others thru and by the means of slavery. Just because a thing is not counted as a sin in the eyesight of man it does not make it right to God. Just because slavery is no longer legal does not make it not done and even to the point we can become enslaved in the mindset.  Which is more crippling than the chains of bondage by being physically enslaved by others. 

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Trade in African Lion Bones for Asian Market Faces Scrutiny - News of Africa - Online African News - Daily Newspaper - Breaking News

Trade in African Lion Bones for Asian Market Faces Scrutiny - News of Africa - Online African News - Daily Newspaper - Breaking News | Africa | Scoop.it
Wildlife traffickers in a major African park have been offering rewards for a full lion carcass, raising concerns that poachers are increasingly targeting a vulnerable species because of demand in some Asian countries for lion bones used in traditional medicine. The report from Mozambique’s Niassa National Reserve comes amid debate about whether the legal, annual …
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8A JessicaL's curator insight, February 16, 2017 9:03 AM
"Trade in African Lion Bones for Asian Market Faces Scrutiny" is an article about wildlife traffickers in a major African park have been offering rewards for a full lion body, raising concerns that poachers are increasingly targeting vulnerable species because of demand in some Asian countries for lion bones used in traditional medicine. Hundreds of captive-bred lions in South Africa have been exported to China and Southeast Asia. Lions are facing other threats including human trespass on habitats and the poaching of antelopes and other animals for food. The number of African lions has dropped more than 40 percent to about 20,000 in the past two decades.The Niassa wildlife park has at least a third of Mozambique’s population of 2,700 lions. People are paying $1,500 for a full lion body. Last year, Mozambican police seized a haul of rhino horn as well as six kilograms (13 pounds) of lion claws and teeth in suitcases at Maputo International Airport. In January, poachers cut through the fences at an animal park is South Africa and decapitated and chopped off the paws of three male lions. 

This is related to what we have been learning because we recently read an article about fighting wildlife trade in Kenya. The article was about poaching being a global problem and the international demand for ivory and rhino horn which is causing decreasing elephant and rhino populations in Kenya. This article helps me understand Africa because it taught me that people are killing lions for their bones to be used in traditional medicine. People are also paying a lot of money for this which I think isn't beneficial to both humans or lions. African lion bones are a relatively recent substitute for the bones of Asian tigers. These traditional medicines are popular in China. I think the topic discussed in the article is interesting because I once went to a China black market that sold tiger bone wine and tiger bone medicine. Even though tiger trade is illegal in China, people still continue this trade and are even adding other endangered animals to this process.
8B AlexL's curator insight, February 16, 2017 9:46 AM
This article is about the poachers are targeting rare species like lions because some Asian countries demands for lion bones which are used in traditional medicine. From the national reserve debated about if it is legal or not to export bones from hundreds of lions in South Africa to China. These lions also faces other threats , like humans invading the habitats, poachers trying to capture and hunting other animals for food. The number of African lions in the wild has dropped by more than 40 percent. Some people say if we ban on the trade in captive-breed lion bones, the poachers might poach wild animals more. 

This helps me understand Africa because today we read about poachers poaching wild animals in Kenya. From this article I knew this was a serious problem. It says that more than 40 percent of African lions in the wild has dropped. This shocked me.

I think that it should be banned to the trade in captive-breed lion bones. I think they should make the punishments more harsh for poaching so that the poachers would realize they shouldn't do it. I also think that China and other countries should stop demanding for lion bones just for the traditional medicine.I think medicine nowadays are good enough.
8B PorjaiP's curator insight, February 23, 2017 10:00 AM
In a major park in Africa, Wildlife Traffickers have been offering rewards for a full lion carcass. This had caused concerns to rise because the amount of poachers targeting vulnerable species in order to make traditional medicine (using lion bones) in some Asian countries, are constantly growing. African lion bones are used as a substitute for Asian tiger bones, whose number were decreased by the poachers. Not only do the lions face the problem of poaching, they are also being threatened by human encroachment and the poaching of other animals for food, which leads the predators to be deprived of prey. According to recent studies, it is shown that the number of African lions living in the wild have decreased by more than 40% to about 20,000 in the past two decades. South Africa's environmental affairs department worries that if they ban the trade of captive-bred lion bones could cause more poaching of wild lions. 

The reason why I chose to do this article is because again, like in my previous article, we are currently learning about poaching in the Africa Unit. This helped me understand Africa better because it tells me how difficult the situation is in Africa. Like for example, if they don't ban it, people will continue to keep doing it, but if they ban it, more people will do it also. This proves how difficult the situation is like in Africa. In my opinion, I think that it is very sad that people are doing this to such innocent and beautiful creatures. I hope that someday they will find a solution to end this poaching problem in Africa. 
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Elephants are taught to sniff out bombs and explosives

Elephants are taught to sniff out bombs and explosives | Africa | Scoop.it
African elephants can sniff out explosives, and their owners say they are better than dogs. They also have a longer memory so the trainer is far quicker than sniffer dogs.

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Ebola Cases Are Falling In West Africa

Ebola Cases Are Falling In West Africa | Africa | Scoop.it

The number of people falling victim to the Ebola virus in West Africa has dropped to the lowest level in months, the World Health Organization said on Friday, but dwindling funds and a looming rainy season threaten to hamper efforts to control the disease. More than 8,668 people have died in the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, which first surfaced in Guinea more than a year ago. But the three worst-affected countries — Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone — have now recorded falling numbers of new cases for four successive weeks, Dr. Bruce Aylward, the health organization’s assistant director general, told reporters in Geneva.

 

Liberia, which was struggling with more than 300 new cases a week in August and September, recorded only eight new cases in the week to Jan. 18, the organization reported. In Sierra Leone, where the infection rate is now highest, there were 118 new cases reported in that week, compared with 184 in the previous week and 248 in the week before that.

 

Speaking just after a visit to the region, Dr. Aylward said on Friday that the “really substantial reduction” in new cases was a direct result of last fall’s vast buildup of resources for fighting the epidemic. “This is the first time that the countries were in a position to stop Ebola,” he said.

 

President Ernest Bai Koroma of Sierra Leone announced on Friday that the country was lifting the travel restrictions that it had imposed in an effort to contain the virus. “Victory is in sight,” Mr. Koroma said.

 

Dr. Aylward cautioned that “the things that have been driving the reduction so far will not get us to zero,” and that health authorities do not yet have the spread of the disease completely under control.

 

The good news about falling infection rates also bore a danger, Dr. Aylward said: Pledges of international financial support for the Ebola response were falling, as well. He said that $1.5 billion was needed to fight the disease for the next six months, but that only $482 million had been committed so far. Most of those pledges were made last year.


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8B Sarah's curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:38 AM

West Africa (mostly Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea) has been fighting an Ebola Epidemic for a long time, and the number of deaths has finally gone down. This epidemic has been around for more than an year now. A lot of people died, and it's good that it is now getting better. 

  I am so glad the Ebola epidemic in West Africa is settling down! When I first heard there was a deadly epidemic going around during summer of 2014, I swear, I was about to have a heart attack. I told all my best friends and family that there was an epidemic was going on, and that all of us are going to die. I cried, and I begged my parents to cancel the flight to Japan because I was afraid I'd catch Ebola at the airport. Now as I think about it, it was an overreaction, but I thought the world was ending, so I was really scared. Not too long after that, I did some research and reassured myself we'll be alright for about 6 months.  

  I feel really bad for all the people that died of Ebola, and their family and friends. 1 person's death is bad enough, but like 8000? In this day and age? That's horrible. I also thought it was horrible that people cared about Ebola since it started, but nobody was really worried about it until Western people started dying. From all the news reports I've read, I felt that that's when people actually tried to do something about it. That's just racist, pathetic and awful. I'm not sure though, this is just an educated guess of what happened when I put together all the information about Ebola I've read in the past.

8A Green's curator insight, February 5, 2015 10:21 AM

       Article #1

      In West Africa, the number of people who have been infected by Ebola has dropped to the lowest level in months. The Ebola virus was surfaced in Guinea more than a year ago ,and later spread to other countries in West Africa, such as Liberia and Sierra Leone. The number of new cases of Ebola in Liberia has dropped to now only 8 new cases per week and in Sierra Leone, 118 new cases. These numbers of new cases are very low compared to the number of cases in August and September last year. The President of Sierra Leone announced that the country is lifting the travel restrictions that it had imposed in an effort to contain the virus. He said that they are running out of cash five to six months before the virus will stop because $1.5 billion was needed to fight the disease, but only $482 million had been committed so far.

      This article helps me understand the lives in Africa. It helps me know what’s going on in Africa and the diseases there. I read in the textbook that many people in Africa died because of diseases and Ebola killed many lives of Africans. I think this article is a very great news to know that less people are infected with Ebola and they are successful in fighting the disease. However, I think it is sad that they are running out of cash to make it stop. I hope the number of new cases continue to drop, and the international countries help funding for the cure.


8B Amy's curator insight, February 5, 2015 11:16 AM

#1

The article is about the decreasing of the number of people in West Africa that have to deal with the Ebola virus. The World Health Organization said that the funds and a looming rainy season threaten to hamper efforts to control the disease. More than 8,668 people have died in the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. The three worst countries that got affected are Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone.


This article helps me understand more about Africa. It shows the situation they have to be in and that there are people trying to help them. Africa is a big continent and many people have to live in very bad conditions which might cause Ebola to spread easier. This virus ha been going on in the news for a long time and I am glad to hear that it is getting better.


Ebola has affected many lives but I think it is great news for people who live in West Africa. Many people suffer and sometimes die from Ebola, but I do feel better knowing that the number of people that has this disease is reducing. I hope that it will keep on decreasing like this.


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WW1's untold story: The forgotten African battlefields - CNN.com

WW1's untold story: The forgotten African battlefields  - CNN.com | Africa | Scoop.it
As the world commemorates the Centenary of the Great War, the African side of this story remains a footnote, despite huge losses of human lives.

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Susanna Lee's comment, February 4, 2015 7:39 AM
This CNN article, titled “WW1’s Untold Story: The Forgotten African Battlefields”, informs us about the African contribution to the WW1. Much of the soldiers who were involved in the WWI battlefield and the East African Campaign were indeed Africans. However, the African side of the story is hardly told to or remembered by us today. East African Campaign lasted for the longest period of time during the whole WW1, but it is hardly recognized to us. While battles in Europe centered around building of the trenches, battles in Africa required huge mobility, short raids, and it involved long treks on foot. This implies that battles that occurred outside Europe, in Africa, was much more harsh in its condition. Then, we can say that soldiers in Africa must have been in a worse condition than the soldiers in Europe, but not very many historians recognize this fact today. The war was destructive not only to the soldiers but also the porters and workers. Porters had an important role during the war; they say that approximately four “native carriers” supported one soldier; and they were mostly women and children. These native carriers transported food, weapons, and other things to the soldiers. They eventually died from harsh treatment, resulting in disease infection and malnutrition. The article says that WW1, although often referred to as the Great war of Europe, was rather the war of European colonies. Also, the article talks about the ongoing “The World War One in Africa Project”. I didn’t know that such project existed.
This article helped me to understand the aftermath of European colonization of Africa. I saw how the colonization and imperialization which started many hundred years ago caused this kind of sacrifice in the African countries during the 20th century, which is only a recent past. I used to think that the WW1 happened mainly in Europe and that the rest of the world was not so much involved, and that it is a European war with not so much meaning to us outside of Europe, but after reading the article, I learned that it brought about so many sacrifices to Africa. I think European retelling of the WW1 is one example of biased history. I felt enraged while reading because human lives in Africa were treated so lightly, just because they belonged to the colonies. To be truly autonomous, I think a country should be able to tell its own history. It seems that Africa is recently concentrating on strengthening it’s educational system and many African scholars and writers have been recognised also. I think there is hope for Africa. I hope the African government invest more, especially in humanity studies so that they can interpret their own history, and as a consequence, gain full autonomy of themselves. Also, I hope the writer’s project, “The World War One in Africa Project”, would be fruitful.
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Robert Mugabe shrugs off concern about new African role

Robert Mugabe shrugs off concern about new African role | Africa | Scoop.it
The new African Union chairman says he is not worried about what the West will think of his appointment.

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8B Punch's curator insight, February 4, 2015 8:03 AM

Scoop #1

The article "Robert Mugabe Shrugs Off Concern About New African Role", is about the new African Union chairman who is none other than Robert Mugabe. Mugabe has had lots of trouble (including a travel ban) with the West (Europe and America) due to his political violence and intimidation. So once he was appointed the new chairman, the West were worried. However, Mugabe is admired and respected by many people in Africa, mainly because he is Africa's former liberation war hero and third-longest server. He hopes to raise the standard of living for his people and to raise the sanction his country is in. Furthermore, he expresses his ideas about the empowerment of women in Africa, saying men and women are equal.

 

This article helps me understand the strain in the relationship between the West and Africa. It really relates to what we are learning about now and how before, Africa and Europe had a trading relationship, but then Europe got greedy and everything turned bitter. In this case, Africa has appointed Robert Mugabe as the new African Union chairman. Robert Mugabe is not trusted by the West so the relationship between Africa and the West would be full of mistrust and doubt. In both cases, there was something that made things go wrong. My personal opinion on this is kind off neutral. Since I don't really know about Mugabe, I can't really judge. But if his people admire him deeply then he must have done something right. I think the whole mistrust and politics thing is unnecessary. If they just dropped it and started over, things would be so much more simple. I also especially liked  what Mugabe said about how there were things men can do that women can't, and things women can do that men can't. It really showed how we need men and women to balance things out.

 

By Punch

 

 

8A Ye Rim Park's curator insight, February 5, 2015 4:15 PM

The article is about Robert Mugabe, the oldest president of Zimbabwe, who has concerns that his appointment as new African Union chairman would badly affect relations between the pan-African bloc and the West. Robert Mugabe said that he doesn't care what West says, and that his business was to ensure the decisions they take are implemented.

This article helps me to understand Africa because Robert Mugabe is quite an influential person in Africa, which gives me lots of clues of Africa while learning about him

I think that Robert Mugabe is a great president, even though he is old I think he still has great discernment. I am really surprised that Robert Mugabe was 90, my grandfather is about 75 years old and can't really do anything because of his age.


 

Fanny Kay's curator insight, February 5, 2015 9:59 PM

WHO: Robert Mugabe, new chairman of the African Union


WHEN / WHERE: February 1st 2015


WHY: This article is quite factual, simply reporting the sayings of the new chairman. He expresses views concerning international diplomacy, notably with 'the West', so Europe and America which shows a desire for independence and a resentment for the tone adopted by the West, that tires to "control (Africans) and control (African) ways", according to him. 


WHAT: The report commences with Mugabe's statement regarding foreign judgment. He makes it clear that he cares not of it, and that unless the West is prepared to treat the African continent as an equal with whom they cooperate, instead of someone inferior who they could "control", then they and their opinion would not be welcomed.It is later noted how the hostility between the chairman and the West further expresses himself, such as for example travel bans to the US and the EU. Finally, Mugabe discusses equality of the sexes in Zimbabwe with questionable political correctness, saying with pride how far female empowerment has come in the work place. This article lacks comments and interpretations of facts, though the factual information it does give lets the reader more or less weave an interpretation of their own.

 

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First of 3000 Child Soldiers Are Released in South Sudan - New York Times

First of 3000 Child Soldiers Are Released in South Sudan - New York Times | Africa | Scoop.it
United Nations officials said they had secured one of the largest demobilizations of children ever, and the first 280, ages 11 to 17, have turned in their weapons.

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8B Melissa G.'s curator insight, February 4, 2015 4:04 AM

Current Events #1:

 

Two hundred and eighty out of three thousand child soldiers have been released so far in South Sudan. These 280 child soldiers were between the ages of 11 and 17, and the rest will be released very soon. They had been fighting for the rebel militia for years, never given the opportunity to an education until now. Unicef is trying to reunite the child soldiers with their families, later on offering education programs. South Sudan has been in a civil war since December 2013, when fighting broke out between South Sudan's two major ethnic groups two years after South Sudan was given independence from Sudan. Despite attempts to form a power sharing government and a cease-fire, fighting still breaks out between the rebel militia and the government. These 280 child soldiers are not from one of the major ethnic groups fighting for power, but are from another: the Murle. The Murle were pulled into the civil war, first fighting as rebels and later for the government. Unfortunately there are still many child soldiers fighting in the war, which is devastating the country.

 

This article helps me to understand Africa because it makes me realize how independence and its effects is still such an issue in Africa. Even after the independence Africans so badly fought for from the Europeans, the countries are going through such a hard time. If the Europeans hadn't have drawn the borderlines, maybe the two major fighting ethnic groups in South Sudan (the Dinka and the Nuer) wouldn't have to live near each other, and then the fighting would never have started. I think child soldiers are a horrible thing. Children should be getting an education and having fun, not being forced to fight in wars. It makes me realize how lucky I am to have a good education and to be living in a safe environment. I hope that soon child soldiers can have the same things.

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The Dance Hall: A-Z of African Dance | The Kid Should See This

The Dance Hall: A-Z of African Dance | The Kid Should See This | Africa | Scoop.it
Azonto, bolo, coupé décalé, dialgati, ëpukay, flékélé, funana, gweta, hapingo, ikoku, jazzé, kizomba, logobi, mulay ceuguin, ndem, oriental, pantsula, rass, rimbaxpaxpax, sabar, skelewu, taracha, thia...

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8B Carys's curator insight, February 4, 2015 12:25 PM

Nowadays, many young people in Africa are unemployed. With no work, many hang around on street corners, getting into trouble; they give up on their dreams. Mariama Touré, a 26-year-old women from Senegal noticed the need for a healthy alternative, and decided to set up a dance studio. Growing up in Dakar, she had always wanted to dance, but their had been nowhere suitable. Wanting to help others, she organised dance classes and eventually opened her own studio: The Dance Hall. To publicize this new place, they made a video called A-Z of African Dance. With styles from coupé décalé to logobi, from thiaxagün to xeccël, the video displayed the culturally unique aspects of African dance. Going viral, it certainly did its job of telling the world about this new birth of dance.
People often stereotype Africans as people in extreme poverty, surviving on very little. However, many Africans have similar lifestyles to us. In some ways, in fact, they are richer than us. They have so much passion for showing the world their cultures, and aren't afraid to be themselves. One big part of their culture is dance. When African's listen to music, they love to move, to feel it. Personally, I love to watch Africans dance. They understand the true meaning of dance, and they embrace it. To dance is to express your emotions through your actions, to let the music flow through you. I think that dance is an art that more people should practise. Like Dakar, young people all around the world struggle with unemployment. I believe that studios, like The Dance Hall, should be set up as a sort of refuge for those living on the streets. Dance is the best way to express what you're feeling, without others judging you. Actions speak louder than words, so Dance.

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Kayla Hounsell in Africa: 'I was young by body and I was young by mind, but I was not young'

Kayla Hounsell in Africa: 'I was young by body and I was young by mind, but I was not young' | Africa | Scoop.it
He doesn’t know when he was born, and therefore he doesn’t know how old he is, but he believes he was around four years old when he became a soldier.

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8B Curie's curator insight, February 4, 2015 8:01 AM

 #1)          This article is about John Kon Kelei's experience in being a child soldier and his dedication to release child soldiers. John Kon Kelei was a child soldier when he was about four years old. He didn't know when he was born or how old he is now, but he remembers that he was a young child ,at about age four, when we was working as a child soldier. He was not released from the army. He defected, which means to desert a cause or a country and adopt another. He mentions that if they found out, it could lead to firing squad. He was glad to hear that 3,000 child soldiers were rescued from such conditions. However, both Kelei and Whitman are concerned about the children's adaptation to the civil world when they are so used to fighting and killing and that is the only thing they know. Therefore, there has to be more work done. Still,  Kelei says that children out there doing those things, can shine more when they are out into the civil world. He uses himself as an example saying that if he can get a Master's degree, so can the children.Whitman also says that children out there doing such horrible things against their will, can do things that are much worthy when they are out of that society and that people should find a way that can prohibit the practice of recollecting child soldiers when there is a war.

              This article helps me understand about Africa more because it shows the suffocation and the brutal treatment of being a child soldier. It also demonstrates how others who have experienced being a child soldier, overcome it and now released, really want to help others who are suffocating like they used to. It was such a sad but a warm story. I felt love and care when Kelei was talking about how he wants to get children out. He knows it is a jeopardic action, but he feels so much in his heart. He feels anger and wants his people to get out from that. I think this whole thing about the child soldier is just to sad. As adults say, children are carrying out the responsibility of great, significant changes on society. Taking innocent children and not only exposing them to such an intense environment but also making them being a part of it, should stop. This is wrong.

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Nigeria buys black market weapons to fight Boko Haram - The Globe and Mail

Nigeria buys black market weapons to fight Boko Haram - The Globe and Mail | Africa | Scoop.it
Former anti-corruption czar says government was forced to buy illegal arms because West won’t help

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8A Ken Chattipakorn's curator insight, February 4, 2015 3:46 AM

This article is about how Nigeria is feeling helpless in the face of the Boko Haram threat and needs arms. USA  has been reluctant to offer assistance to Nigeria due to the corruption and human rights violations in their army. Nuhu Ribadu, a anti-corruption leader says that Nigeria is not receiving the help that other countries like Iraq and Afghanistan. He says that even though it is wrong to buy weapons on the black market, he says that these weapons have already helped Nigerian soldiers win back several towns that were captured by the Boko Haram. Nigeria anti-corruption leader also says that the government was forced to buy the weapons because the West was not providing good support to Nigeria like other countries are getting. However, the USA are reluctant to give Nigeria support due to their human rights violation in the army and other illegal dealings in their armies.

 

This article helps me better understand Africa in many ways. It shows me how desperate some countries are  that they are willing to buy illegal weapons. It also shows me that sometimes, the USA are very picky about who they help. I think that this article is important. it gives information about the events happening in Nigeria. I think that it is wrong of the USA to deny a country assistance that they need to stop terrorists. The USA should at least send some support like weapons and stuff. I also think that it is wrong of Nigeria to buy illegal black market weapons but I can understand that they are feeling very desperate right now. I think that if they really want aid from the west, they should probably reduce their corruption in their army and enforce human rights rules in their army so that they can be viewed better by the world so that countries will want to aid them and they then will not have to buy illegal weapons.

 

By Ken Chattipakorn

8B Aroya's curator insight, February 4, 2015 8:32 PM

This article is about Nigeria getting no help from the USA anymore, so they don't have any weapons to fight against Boko Haram. This caused them to have to buy weapons from the black market. Mr. Ribadu said that they feel helpless. He also said that even if the world may think it is illegal, they were stopped giving weapons and their people are getting slaughtered, so they were 'forced' to buy weapons from the black market. He said that the USA, Canada, and other countries promised to help, but they broke their promise. On Friday, the Arican Union made a plan to create a force of 7500 troops to fight against Boko Haram. Soldiers from Chad are reported to be active in battling. 

This article helps me understand how heartless and helpless people can be, like the USA and Canada who broke their promise. It also help me understand how much people would do to for self defense, up to the stage where they are willingly buying illegal weapons. However, if I were Ribadu, I would do the same. I rather do something illegal and keep my people safe and armed, than unarmed and being slaughtered. I think this article is interesting, because I never knew that this kind of event was happening. I was also surprised that Mr. Ribadu actually spoke out to the media, and not keeping it as a secret. This article makes me feel mad of how selfish people can be, and how easily a promise can be broken and how important they are.

By Aroya Youprasit 

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Ebola crisis: First major vaccine trials in Liberia - BBC News

Ebola crisis: First major vaccine trials in Liberia - BBC News | Africa | Scoop.it
The first large-scale trials of experimental vaccines against the deadly Ebola virus begin in Liberia, aimed at immunising 30,000 volunteers.

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8B Diana's curator insight, February 4, 2015 8:48 AM

#1

 

This article is called 'Ebola Crisis: First Major Vaccine Trials in Liberia' on February 2nd, by BBC News. It’s about trials of experimental vaccines against Ebola that had begun in Liberia. Ebola is a disease spread through contact with infected body fluids. Its symptoms include high fever, bleeding, and central nervous system damage. Ebola had killed 8,936 people around the world mostly in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea. Scientists had set up and began the trial on February 2nd, 2015. They infected 12 volunteers with a vaccine which contains fragment of Ebola virus. It’s not certain whether the vaccine will protect Ebola or not, but the aim is to trick the body into producing an immune response. Vaccines train the immune systems to fight off any future infection. A senior Liberian scientist, Stephen Kennedy, said the vaccine will not do any harm to the volunteers because the vaccine only contain a small amount of Ebola virus and there is no chance of the volunteers getting Ebola from the vaccine. The first person who received the vaccine was a middle-aged Liberian. When he was asked how he felt, he smiled and gave a thumbs-up. Doctors also have been trailing serum therapy which is a treatment made from the blood of Ebola survivors who have recovered. “It is a step in the right direction,” said Duncan Bell. MSF.

 

This article helps me understand Africa because it helps me visualize the situation in Africa. I can tell from the article that many people suffered, lost their family, and died from Ebola. I think many people had volunteered for injection to stop the suffering in their country. This reminds me of when Africa fought for their independence. They worked together as a country to drive colonial powers away from their countries and succeeded. I think if they keep on trying, they will eventually find a vaccine that can prevent, and cure Ebola. I think the topic discussed in the article, Ebola, is a topic that everyone should consider about because it may not be a problem in the place where we are, but it is definitely a big problem in Africa. I hope one day scientists will find a way to cure Ebola.

 

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Africa - Homemade bomb explodes in Cairo, airport put on alert

Africa - Homemade bomb explodes in Cairo, airport put on alert | Africa | Scoop.it
Cairo airport authorities tightened security after finding two bombs near the arrivals hall and a homemade explosive device exploded in the centre of the Egyptian capital on Tuesday, security officials said.

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8B Daniel's curator insight, February 3, 2015 10:53 PM

This Tuesday, in the airport at Cairo, two bombs were discovered and a homemade bomb exploded. By the explosion, two people got lightly injured. The two bombs that didn't explode were detected with electronic devices. The people who left the bomb in the airport seems to be an Islamist militant. The Islamist militants are seeking to topple the government, and they have already carried out several bomb attacks on soldiers and police since the July of 2013. This text was by FRANCE 24 Follow france24_en on twitter. 

 

This article helps me to learn more about Africa. BY this article, I learned that in Africa, there are fights and wars between the citizens and the government. Africa is not safe place, and there are religious groups, which they attack and terror people and places. Even though Africa has a lot of beautiful animals and pyramids, it is still very dangerous. When I read about the article, it reminded me about the bombing at the Boston Marathon. There were two bombs that exploded during the marathon and lots of people died. There are lots of bombing and terrorizing occurring in the world. I think the police and the military should stop this and bring peace to the countries suffering in pain. Also, I feel sorry for the people who got injured during the bombing. I think the police were lucky to stop the other two bombs from exploding. Since there are lots of people in the airport, it is important to keep the place safe. 

8A Sophia's curator insight, February 5, 2015 8:46 AM

#1

This article is about two homemade bombs found planted in a busy square in downtown Cairo, called Taalat Harb Square, two were lightly injured. The bomb was detonated in was one of the most key central squares in a side road. The bombs were detected with electronic devices, early in the Tuesday morning. There has been no claim for who had placed and set off the bomb. This article helps me understand more about the struggle for power in Africa and how unstable places are right now, with many people fighting.

 

I think this is important, because sooner or later, there may be more political struggle for power. There may also be more acts of terrorism. I think if somebody doesn't stop this or try to make peace, there will be a lot more bloodshed.

8A Justin's curator insight, February 5, 2015 10:20 AM

   Two bombs were found in Cairo Airport near the arrivals hall. The bombs were detected with electronic devices on Tuesday morning. The airport security officials are still reviewing video footage and trying to figure out who planted the bombs. A homemade explosive device also exploded in downtown, Cairo on the same day. The bomb exploded just on a side road.The blast was small but it lightly wounded 2 people. No one has claimed responsibility for either incidents yet.

   I think that these two incidents were not planned together because one is a homemade bomb and the other is probably a big bomb. If they were planned together, the person who planted these bombs would have probably used all big bombs. I think it is just a coincidence that these two incidents happened on the same day. This has helped me understand about Africa a bit more. I now know that people also attack and threaten places, like airports, in Africa too and not just the United States. 

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Boko Haram crisis: Chad's troops enter Nigeria - BBC News

Boko Haram crisis: Chad's troops enter Nigeria - BBC News | Africa | Scoop.it
Chadian troops backed by air strikes enter north-eastern Nigeria to join the battle against Islamist militant group Boko Haram.

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Natthaya Eiamampai's curator insight, February 5, 2015 6:33 AM

Current Events #1 

In this article, Chadian group have entered Nigeria to join the battle against Boko Haram. Therefore, the Boko Haram leader, Abubakar Shekau threatened to create a caliphate, or a form of Islamic government lead by caliph. More cooperation is expected form neighbouring states. Seems like Boko Haram have done many things that is bad for Nigeria, for example, they abducted more than 200 school girls, destroyed Gamboru, and killing most of its people. However, recently, Nigeria regained control of Gamboru

 

This helped me understand more about Africa. According to the article, there are still wars going on in parts of Africa. If there are wars inside of a country, then the country can't grow, both politically, economically, or culturally. I have a feeling that even though Africa has a lot of valuable resources such as gold the country will not develop. No body would want to be economically engaged with this country. Therefore, as long as the wars don't stop, the people and the country won't develop. 

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Real Life Mowgli: Girl Who Grew Up in the African Wildlife

Real Life Mowgli: Girl Who Grew Up in the African Wildlife | Africa | Scoop.it
Real Life Mowgli: Girl Who Grew Up in the African Wildlife

Geekfiller - Ryan

3 mins ago


0 | 0 The post Real Life Mowgli: Girl Who Grew Up in the African Wildlife appeared first on ThumbPress.

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African firm says to close deal to supply lemons to Dubai

African firm says to close deal to supply lemons to Dubai | Africa | Scoop.it
Jacaranda Agricultura Norte already produces bananas for emirate; eyes major lemon production boost

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Rhino horn ‘smugglers’ tried this week

Rhino horn ‘smugglers’ tried this week | Africa | Scoop.it
Two Vietnamese nationals will appear in the Kempton Park Magistrate's Court on February 6 court on charges of illegal possession and smuggling.

Via Wildlife Margrit, Julia Lee
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Poaching is terrible!

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8B Charlie Capadona's curator insight, February 4, 2015 9:35 PM

This article is about two men stealing a really expensive rhino horn. They were smuggling the horn at Tambo Airport. The police suspected that they were taken at Kruger National Park at the South Africa's border. The police thinks that they stole about 18 horns. Fortunately, they were arrested.

 

When I read this article I thought it was horrible that they stole so many horns on lots of rhino's. I also was kind of mad because the just stole the horn from a national park and that the park should be more protected. But luckily, the two men were arrested. 

 

 

Julia Lee's curator insight, February 8, 2015 9:55 PM

This article is about two Vietnamese who were going to be appear in the Magistrate's court because of illegal possession and smuggling. They caught by the magistrate because of that. This artilcle made me to understand about Afirca more. The reason is, I didn't know that people want rhion's horn. I heared that there are some people caught by illegal possession of ivory, but this is the first time that I heard about rhino. 

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Africa - Troops repel first Boko Haram attack in Niger

Africa - Troops repel first Boko Haram attack in Niger | Africa | Scoop.it
Troops in Niger fought off an attack by Boko Haram, officials said Friday, the Islamists' first raid inside Niger's border. The move underscored fears that Boko Haram's insurgency is spreading from its stronghold in Nigeria to neighbouring states.

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8B Deborah Kim's curator insight, February 8, 2015 9:04 AM

Boko Haram attacked Niger, so troops in Niger fought them off. 

 

I think that this kind of connected to myself because I learned about war and leaders. I felt really bad that the troops had to fight. People must have died a lot. This helped me to understand more about how Niger is. Maybe there are a lot of wars going on in Niger.

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Africa Loses $60 Billion a Year Illegally #World

Africa Loses $60 Billion a Year Illegally #World | Africa | Scoop.it

Companies and government officials are illegally moving up to $60 billion out of Africa each year, depriving the world’s poorest continent of capital and tax revenue that could spur faster economic growth. …read more http://skymeteor.com/NO.186031/africa-loses-60-billion-a-year-illegally-2/


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Vanda Omaree's curator insight, February 5, 2015 1:55 AM

 Africa loses $60 billion a year illegally. African leaders say that they are losing millions of dollars to illegal operations and corrupt people. Former South African president Mr. Mbeki says that they are losing millions of dollars that could be used to do other things instead. He says that governments are corrupt and that they are the source that makes Africa lose their money. They say that these companies are being corrupt and are damaging Africa greatly. Even as Africa works to stop these corruptions, it is still hard to stop them. The leaders of the past  African countries say they must work together to stop and make Africa prosper.


  By reading this article, it makes me change my perspective of Africa. It makes the country seems weak and not unified.  My opinion to this article is, I get to understand how selfish people can get. While they are getting money, the other people are losing it. Especially in this occasion, they are cheating on their own country and their own people. I feel bad for the government that they have to try to stop these company from cheating, which is not easy. I wish people would think more about others rather than themselves. Our world would be much nicer if there aren’t selfish people.


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For a Village in South Africa, New Water System Changes Lives

For a Village in South Africa, New Water System Changes Lives | Africa | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola has joined forces with local and international organizations to provide easier access to clean water in Africa.

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Jack Palmer's curator insight, February 4, 2015 9:52 AM

NUMBER ONE

This article is about the Coca-Cola African Foundation. They have helped the people in the South African village of Ramotshinyadi by providing clean water to its nearly 10000 residents. They supplied the electrical connection necessary to pump water.

 

I was very happy when I read this article. I think the Coca-Cola African Foundation is great since they are doing all these nice things to the people in need. Water is a very important for humans. Not being able to have access to clean water is a very sad thing. Now, the people can feel safe because they know that the water they are drinking is clean and not contaminated. 

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Barbie Outsold By Queens Of Africa Dolls With Braids And Traditional African ... - The Inquisitr

Barbie Outsold By Queens Of Africa Dolls With Braids And Traditional African ... - The Inquisitr | Africa | Scoop.it
Queens of Africa dolls have managed to dethrone the ruler of the doll universe. However, they’ve only conquered one small part of Barbie’s worldwide empire –

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8B Cathy's curator insight, February 4, 2015 1:07 PM

   The "Queen of Africa" dolls are dethroning world famous Barbie with traditional clothing and braided hair. They have already dominated Nigeria as the most popular plastic princess and are spreading among other countries. Many African girls are discouraged from the 'ideal body type' represented by Barbie, but "Queen of Africa" dolls represent the beauty behind individuality, dark skin, and various builds. "What is really frustrating is the generalization that Africans have to look a certain way and act a certain way. We will do our best to represent as much of the diversity of Africans as we can." Says the creator of "Queen of Africa".


     This article helps me to understand Africa because of the discouragement created by Barbie (a Western creation). It shows me that Western influence is embedded so deeply into African nations that it is even changing the mindsets of young girls into thinking that being light- skinned, thin, and Western is beautiful. The Western influence had been ingrained so deeply ever since the colonies arrived in Africa and scrambled for land. "Queens of Africa" remind me of when Africans began to grow nationalism in the 1900s to free themselves from the West and to become individuals. It's the same situation, free themselves from being vain and instead happily embrace you heritage. Since Western influence still has a hold on the mindset of 'ideal body type', that shows that Africa has not completely shaken off the West. I think that it's a good topic for this article because we really need to get it into everyone's minds that being unique and happy is the greatest outcome of all and that everyone's beautiful. I think that it's great that the African dolls are starting to overthrow the empire of 'perfection' and starting a new one of originality.

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Ebola Cases Are Falling In West Africa

Ebola Cases Are Falling In West Africa | Africa | Scoop.it

The number of people falling victim to the Ebola virus in West Africa has dropped to the lowest level in months, the World Health Organization said on Friday, but dwindling funds and a looming rainy season threaten to hamper efforts to control the disease. More than 8,668 people have died in the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, which first surfaced in Guinea more than a year ago. But the three worst-affected countries — Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone — have now recorded falling numbers of new cases for four successive weeks, Dr. Bruce Aylward, the health organization’s assistant director general, told reporters in Geneva.

 

Liberia, which was struggling with more than 300 new cases a week in August and September, recorded only eight new cases in the week to Jan. 18, the organization reported. In Sierra Leone, where the infection rate is now highest, there were 118 new cases reported in that week, compared with 184 in the previous week and 248 in the week before that.

 

Speaking just after a visit to the region, Dr. Aylward said on Friday that the “really substantial reduction” in new cases was a direct result of last fall’s vast buildup of resources for fighting the epidemic. “This is the first time that the countries were in a position to stop Ebola,” he said.

 

President Ernest Bai Koroma of Sierra Leone announced on Friday that the country was lifting the travel restrictions that it had imposed in an effort to contain the virus. “Victory is in sight,” Mr. Koroma said.

 

Dr. Aylward cautioned that “the things that have been driving the reduction so far will not get us to zero,” and that health authorities do not yet have the spread of the disease completely under control.

 

The good news about falling infection rates also bore a danger, Dr. Aylward said: Pledges of international financial support for the Ebola response were falling, as well. He said that $1.5 billion was needed to fight the disease for the next six months, but that only $482 million had been committed so far. Most of those pledges were made last year.


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8B Sarah's curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:38 AM

West Africa (mostly Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea) has been fighting an Ebola Epidemic for a long time, and the number of deaths has finally gone down. This epidemic has been around for more than an year now. A lot of people died, and it's good that it is now getting better. 

  I am so glad the Ebola epidemic in West Africa is settling down! When I first heard there was a deadly epidemic going around during summer of 2014, I swear, I was about to have a heart attack. I told all my best friends and family that there was an epidemic was going on, and that all of us are going to die. I cried, and I begged my parents to cancel the flight to Japan because I was afraid I'd catch Ebola at the airport. Now as I think about it, it was an overreaction, but I thought the world was ending, so I was really scared. Not too long after that, I did some research and reassured myself we'll be alright for about 6 months.  

  I feel really bad for all the people that died of Ebola, and their family and friends. 1 person's death is bad enough, but like 8000? In this day and age? That's horrible. I also thought it was horrible that people cared about Ebola since it started, but nobody was really worried about it until Western people started dying. From all the news reports I've read, I felt that that's when people actually tried to do something about it. That's just racist, pathetic and awful. I'm not sure though, this is just an educated guess of what happened when I put together all the information about Ebola I've read in the past.

8A Green's curator insight, February 5, 2015 10:21 AM

       Article #1

      In West Africa, the number of people who have been infected by Ebola has dropped to the lowest level in months. The Ebola virus was surfaced in Guinea more than a year ago ,and later spread to other countries in West Africa, such as Liberia and Sierra Leone. The number of new cases of Ebola in Liberia has dropped to now only 8 new cases per week and in Sierra Leone, 118 new cases. These numbers of new cases are very low compared to the number of cases in August and September last year. The President of Sierra Leone announced that the country is lifting the travel restrictions that it had imposed in an effort to contain the virus. He said that they are running out of cash five to six months before the virus will stop because $1.5 billion was needed to fight the disease, but only $482 million had been committed so far.

      This article helps me understand the lives in Africa. It helps me know what’s going on in Africa and the diseases there. I read in the textbook that many people in Africa died because of diseases and Ebola killed many lives of Africans. I think this article is a very great news to know that less people are infected with Ebola and they are successful in fighting the disease. However, I think it is sad that they are running out of cash to make it stop. I hope the number of new cases continue to drop, and the international countries help funding for the cure.


8B Amy's curator insight, February 5, 2015 11:16 AM

#1

The article is about the decreasing of the number of people in West Africa that have to deal with the Ebola virus. The World Health Organization said that the funds and a looming rainy season threaten to hamper efforts to control the disease. More than 8,668 people have died in the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. The three worst countries that got affected are Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone.


This article helps me understand more about Africa. It shows the situation they have to be in and that there are people trying to help them. Africa is a big continent and many people have to live in very bad conditions which might cause Ebola to spread easier. This virus ha been going on in the news for a long time and I am glad to hear that it is getting better.


Ebola has affected many lives but I think it is great news for people who live in West Africa. Many people suffer and sometimes die from Ebola, but I do feel better knowing that the number of people that has this disease is reducing. I hope that it will keep on decreasing like this.


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Libya conflict over resources not Islam - World Bulletin

Libya conflict over resources not Islam - World Bulletin | Africa | Scoop.it
Libya has remained in turmoil since Gaddafi's ouster and death in 2011

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8B Lydia's curator insight, February 4, 2015 9:20 AM

This article is about the Libyan conflict, and the different political parties involved. It talks about why there is fighting, and who is doing it. It also brings up the topic of weapons, and who's using them. It discusses who the leaders are, and the different ways that they are handling the problem. It brought up the topic of what they are planning to do, what has already happened, and what some people are hoping will happen. The main idea was that the conflict isn't really about religion and ethnicity, but resources, money and power.

 

This article helps me better understand Africa because it shows the different sides of the story and what's really happening. I now understand that this might be happening in other African countries as well as around the world. I think that it is important to talk about the things that are happening in the world so that you can get a better understanding of them with the help of other people and their input. I think that creating awareness of the problem is one of the first steps to solving it. I think that the Libyan conflict has been going one for quite sometime now, and that things are just going to get even more complicated from hear on out. I think that they have to have little goals in mind and try to reach those first instead of trying to stop it all at once. They should get small things that both sides agree on and work on those, together. 

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Liberia's Ebola vaccine trial begins

Liberia's Ebola vaccine trial begins | Africa | Scoop.it

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8B Jemima's curator insight, February 3, 2015 6:43 PM

This article discusses the new vaccines that may be able to cure the Ebola virus. It talks about how Liberia has suffered the most deaths from the virus at 3,710. Scientists hope to immunise around 30,000 volunteers however, as of Monday, 2 February 2015 the testing was started on 12 volunteers. Dr. Stephen Kennedy described how the vaccine works. Basically, they take a small weak strand of the Ebola virus, and inject it into the body. Then the body of the injected person should make anti-bodies to protect itself from the virus. This strand of the virus is not strong though, and so it should not cause the person to get the potentially fatal disease. Another idea that the article mentions is still on the drawing board, is a serum. The idea is to take blood from people who survived having Ebola, and so already have the anti-bodies in them.

 

This article taught me about how big of a problem for West Africans Ebola really is. It also taught me about how hard local Africans are working in partnership with other nations to stop their problems. I also learnt more about African health care. I really liked this article. I was very excited to hear the news of a possible cure. It made me very sad that so many people were dying, and it seemed like such a hopeless situation. Now, even a glimmer of hope is such good news. This article also  made me happy because people are working so hard to solve this problem. I really hope that this cure works out for the best, and can start saving many thousands of lives. 

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South Sudan's elusive peace - Deutsche Welle

South Sudan's elusive peace - Deutsche Welle | Africa | Scoop.it
Will the latest ceasefire bring peace to South Sudan? A look back offers little hope. Fighting has been going on for more than a year. Negotiations often silenced the guns, but only for a few hours at a time.

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8B Zoe's curator insight, February 4, 2015 8:15 AM

This article was written on February 2nd, 2015 by Peter Hille. It talks about the recent ceasefire made between South Sudan's President Salva Kiir and Riek Machar. This article describes the conflict over the years in South Sudan. From this information the author tries to determine based on the countries history, if the ceasefire will last. This article goes back to when South Sudan became an independent country on July 9th, 2011 and shows the many conflicts and civil wars this country has had since that day. The author (Peter Hille) describes the multiple ceasefires that this country has made over the years. He shows that each one has eventually ended up with more war and death. From this he predicts that this country's current ceasefire will not last.


I felt that this article does a very good job at showing this country's history and years of conflict. However, I also felt that the author was somewhat biased in writing this article. He gave the impression that there is absolutely no hope for South Sudan to remain in peace despite it's violent history. I felt that by saying this, he was sort of jumping to conclusions. I chose this article because I felt that it related to our class. First of all the conflict was mostly over natural resources such as oil which relates to the economy in Africa. Secondly, this country was just formed about four years ago, and it reminded me of the fight for liberation in Africa that we are studying.



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Road accident kills 16 in northern Nigeria - News24

Road accident kills 16 in northern Nigeria - News24 | Africa | Scoop.it
Sixteen people have been killed and 35 injured when a passenger bus collided with a truck on a road in northern Nigeria's Yobe State.

Via Nanthalak (Pim) Jitnavasathien
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Nanthalak (Pim) Jitnavasathien's curator insight, February 4, 2015 9:22 PM

Week 1

This article takes place in the Northern of Nigeria where the bus accident happened. This accident happened near a village of Dongo Kuwa and this killed 16 people and injured 35 people that were in the bus. The driver said that he lost control and one of the tyre exploded due to the bad condition of the road.

 

This helps me understand more about Africa because it showed me that some places in Nigeria and likely in most of Africa, there are a lot of bad conditioned roads and these kind of accidents happened quite often. This explains how poor the country can be especially in a small village.I feel very sorry about the people that died during the accident and as well as the people who got injured. I think the people that got injured are mostly poor and if they got injured and they need to pay for the hospital costs, it may cost alot and they may not be able to pay for it. Some people that don't have enough money to pay may just stay home and let the wound get infected and they may die from infection. And this may cause effects to that family because if the person that died is the one who works and makes the most money, if that person died, what would happen to the family's children??