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Startup In Nairobi: All Roads Led To Africa's Mobile Revolution @Investorseurope

Startup In Nairobi: All Roads Led To Africa's Mobile Revolution @Investorseurope | Africa | Scoop.it
At MIT, Kenfield Griffith thought he'd solve the world’s problems. Then he arrived in Kibera. Born in the Caribbean, educated in Boston, startup in Nairobi.

Via Comrade Moses
8A BenB's insight:
This article was about the data collecting and surveying in places like Kenya. The main writer of the article Fredrick Ngugi, talks about the lack of Infrastructure like hospitals and financial institutions in places like Africa. It then introduces us to Kenfield Griffith a student at the Massachusetts Institution of Technology. Griffith has been studying emerging markets for the past couple months. He said his biggest problem was finding accurate data. To fix this problem Griffith created a company to primarily collect accurate data. They decided to test their surveys in Kenya by sending surveys to people in Kenya with cellphones with the promise of .40 US dollars. The question was “where do you go to get your news.” around 36 percent of people getting it from TV and 40 percent from Social Media and the rest being other sources. The company is meant to use to renovate the business and economy in developing countries. This helps me understand Africa by comparing the wealth between the what Africa's economy used to be and how it is now. I think that taking data from such a small percentage of people that have cell phones defeats the purpose of a representation of a whole country. Only about 10% of adults in Kenya have cell phones which is a tiny percent of people that were surveyed. In conclusion this article doesn't serve much purpose to anyone other than to advertise there business
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Comrade Moses's curator insight, March 4, 3:19 PM

"Nairobi-based startup mSurvey is transforming the way entrepreneurs do market research by leveraging mobile phone messaging technologies to extract previously unobtainable data from the growing community of cellphone users across the world"

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Mobile Connectivity Is To Africa What Infrastructure Is To The west #Investorseurope Mauritius

Mobile Connectivity Is To Africa What Infrastructure Is To The west #Investorseurope Mauritius | Africa | Scoop.it
Twice as many sub-Saharan Africans have mobile phone access than access to paved roads. Mobile connectivity is to Africa what infrastructure is to the West.

Via Comrade Moses
8A BenB's insight:
This article was about the connectivity from Africa and the west. The main idea that the article was to point out the flaws of companies that fix things like running water, and cellular service to gladly help people in places like the Americas, but in places like Africa people have to come up with alternative solutions or just not do what they wanted to. The article then mentions this new company in places like Uganda, Tanzania, and Kenya called K-MOPA. K-MOPA is a company that provides solar panels to over 400,000 homes in East Africa. This article can connect to our class because the article is mainly setting place in West Africa where lots of people don’t live in the best conditions (Dominic, Rose, Nancy) to try to help improve their lifestyles. In conclusion this was kind of a weird article because I think the author was paid to write this article as a sort of advertisement for the company.
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Comrade Moses's curator insight, March 17, 7:45 AM

"Without credit, how do you show a provider it is worth building a phone line and connecting you to its service? How can you guarantee its investment in you and in your phone line is going to pay off?"

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Startup In Nairobi: All Roads Led To Africa's Mobile Revolution @Investorseurope

Startup In Nairobi: All Roads Led To Africa's Mobile Revolution @Investorseurope | Africa | Scoop.it
At MIT, Kenfield Griffith thought he'd solve the world’s problems. Then he arrived in Kibera. Born in the Caribbean, educated in Boston, startup in Nairobi.

Via Comrade Moses
8A BenB's insight:
This article was about the data collecting and surveying in places like Kenya. The main writer of the article Fredrick Ngugi, talks about the lack of Infrastructure like hospitals and financial institutions in places like Africa. It then introduces us to Kenfield Griffith a student at the Massachusetts Institution of Technology. Griffith has been studying emerging markets for the past couple months. He said his biggest problem was finding accurate data. To fix this problem Griffith created a company to primarily collect accurate data. They decided to test their surveys in Kenya by sending surveys to people in Kenya with cellphones with the promise of .40 US dollars. The question was “where do you go to get your news.” around 36 percent of people getting it from TV and 40 percent from Social Media and the rest being other sources. The company is meant to use to renovate the business and economy in developing countries. This helps me understand Africa by comparing the wealth between the what Africa's economy used to be and how it is now. I think that taking data from such a small percentage of people that have cell phones defeats the purpose of a representation of a whole country. Only about 10% of adults in Kenya have cell phones which is a tiny percent of people that were surveyed. In conclusion this article doesn't serve much purpose to anyone other than to advertise there business
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Comrade Moses's curator insight, March 4, 3:19 PM

"Nairobi-based startup mSurvey is transforming the way entrepreneurs do market research by leveraging mobile phone messaging technologies to extract previously unobtainable data from the growing community of cellphone users across the world"

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'Fatality figures falling each year as South African mining sector targets 'zero harm' @investorseurope #mining 

'Fatality figures falling each year as South African mining sector targets 'zero harm' @investorseurope #mining  | Africa | Scoop.it
As the yearly recorded number of mining injuries and fatalities in South Africa continues to decrease, albeit at a slower pace in 2016 than in previous years, the focus of the industry shifts once again to renewed efforts to bring the number of fatalities to zero. However, as the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR), mining companies, trade unions and lobby groups continue to emphasise their collective goal of zero harm, 2017 is already out of the running as the year in which this goal will be achieved, owing to four fatalities occurring before the release of the 2016 figures.

Via Igor Espanhol
8A BenB's insight:
This article was about the current state of the mining industry of 2016 around the area of South Africa. The summary of it is the mining business is doing very well. The amount of deaths has decreased greatly, over 24%. Only 78 deaths were reported. The main cause was not being trapped in the mines like it used to be in 2014. It is now mainly falling to death and fires inside the mines. The owners of the mines are now targeting “zero harm” rate with as close no deaths as they can during 2017. This helps connect and understand Africa since we were learning about crude oil from other scoop.it presentations along with mining appearing multiple times in social studies text books on how Africa produces lots of minerals like iron, gold, and diamonds to the rest of the world. In conclusion I think that it is good that mining is becoming safer and that the industry is recognizing the problems it has and actively trying to fix it, so far it seems to be working. This could lead to more people becoming miners and less unemployment overall in South Africa.
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8A AndrewS's curator insight, March 1, 8:44 PM
As the years past, number of mining injuries in Africa is less and less each year, but there are still people who are still getting injury. So they want to make the number of injuries zero. They don’t want anyone who mines in Africa to be injured. Fatalities increased from 112 in 2012 to 93 in 2013, 84 in 2014, 77 in 2015, and 73 in 2016. The number of fatalities on 2016, with 73 fatalities is lowest ever! The number of injuries also drop from 3138 in 2015 to 2662 in 2016, which shows that the mining industry managed to reduce the incidents by 15%. The major causes of these facilities is FoG (fall of ground) with 33%. The problem is that the health and safety in mines are not so go. So to summarize it they are trying to make the number of facilities and injury 0 in 2017. I think that this is a really good idea because according to the social study textbook. 40% of the goods that leave Africa are from mining (the other 60% are from farming) so mining is really important in Africa. This idea will help people become more focused at their job. So to summarize this I think it’s a really good idea, but I don’t think it will be easy to do. I think it will take years for them to decrease the number to 0.
8A BenB's curator insight, March 2, 8:18 AM
This article was about the current state of the mining industry of 2016 around the area of South Africa. The summary of it is the mining business is doing very well. The amount of deaths has decreased greatly, over 24%. Only 78 deaths were reported. The main cause was not being trapped in the mines like it used to be in 2014. It is now mainly falling to death and fires inside the mines. The owners of the mines are now targeting “zero harm” rate with as close to no deaths as they can during 2017. This helps connect and understand Africa since we were learning about crude oil from other scoop.it presentations along with mining appearing multiple times in social studies text books on how Africa produces lots of minerals like iron, gold, and diamonds to the rest of the world. In conclusion I think that it is good that mining is becoming safer and that the industry is recognizing the problems it has and actively trying to fix it, so far it seems to be working. This could lead to more people becoming miners and less unemployment overall in South Africa.
8A LeonardC's curator insight, March 2, 9:23 AM
Mining conditions in South Africa are slowly decrease unlike past years. The Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) is trying to emphasize zero harm in 2017. The DMR pointed out, however, that more mining companies are achieving 12 fatality- free months with appliances improving. People say that the number of fatalities will keep on decreasing. While the platinum industry has the greatest decrease in incidence while the gold industry only gold industry had only a 3% drop. Overall there was a 5% drop in fatalities. More companies are trying to improve the fatality ratio easing tension between companies which makes the companies more focused on health and safety. Many companies are trying to implement more safety resources and procedures in their mine shafts. This will take a lot of time but if they continue to try, great outcomes can occur. This article connect to our lessons because we talked a lot about child slavery and how the working conditions are really bad but also harmful for the kids. In my opinion, the DMR should continue implementing better conditions to the mines because in Africa, mining is a really big industry and if it falls, the economy will really be affected.
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Islamist Rebels Slay Christian Pastor in Central African Republic

Islamist Rebels Slay Christian Pastor in Central African Republic | Africa | Scoop.it
Muslim rebels brutally stabbed to death a Christian pastor in the Central African Republic (CAR), then burnt his church to the ground.

Via Thomas Wentzel
8A BenB's insight:
This was a very sad article to read about. It was informing people that there were muslim militia groups in the Central African Republic (CAR) that had killed a pastor of a church and then proceeded to burn the church to the ground. Sy one of the leaders of the group had been previously killed in an attack along with another militiaman. After the conflict Sy’s allies had gone to two other churches and a school and burned each of them down while killing two people in the crossfire, a man and a woman. They also stormed a hospital with the intention of killing off the wounded which resulted in the death of 5 people and over 26 injuries. The military then intervened killing the rest of Sy’s allies. This was a horrific article. This started in 2013 when the poverty-stricken country Central Africa and the rebels had overthrew the former president Francois Bozize, who was christian. The violence has come to far and it is officially time to stop. It is just a war on religion and which one they must believe in. There is no right side in the conflict. This connects to “A Long Way Gone” by Ishmael Beah who was a former child soldier from Sierra Leone. He wrote about how the rebels he were fighting were absolute monsters. That they didn't have anything human in them. He spoke of horrific events and all the rebels in that story are portrayed as the obvious antagonist, when really it could have been that some were actually fighting for freedom instead of the conflict minerals they were actually fighting for thanks to Charles Taylor who was the whole reason that the civil war of Sierra Leone happened
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8A AndrewS's curator insight, February 16, 9:11 AM
This article is about a group of Islamist executed a christian pastor and burn down churches in Central African Republic. This article is from Breitbart.com . This article is about a group of Muslim rebels brutally stabbed to death a Christian pastor in the Central African Republic (CAR), the proceeded to burn church to the ground. After the initial attack, the Muslim militia set fire to two other churches in area, the Apostolic and St Mathias Church, and also destroyed a local school. Militiamen also reportedly stormed a health facility with the intention of killing off the wounded. According to UN reports, the attacks brought about the combined deaths of at least five people with 26 more injured. This country help me understand the issues of religion in Africa. I can see that some religion are not so friendly with another religion. I not sure what the best solution for this is but I think the best solution for this is to not be racist. I think this all started because white people was being racist to black people. The white people were using the black people as slave and treated them badly so I guess part of these happened because of racism. I didn’t like how Sy (the leader of the Muslim group) needed to kill the pastor because that was a really bad idea, or burn down churches. I think what he’s doing is completely pointless and very bad.
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'Glencore sells two Africa zinc mines to Canada’s Trevali' @investorseurope #mining 

'Glencore sells two Africa zinc mines to Canada’s Trevali' @investorseurope #mining  | Africa | Scoop.it
The $400 million-deal will make of Trevali the first pure zinc company with operations in North and South America as well as Africa.

Via Igor Espanhol
8A BenB's insight:
This article was about the sale of stakes of two zinc mines. The company known as Glencore, a mining company in Burkina Faso, Africa. They sold the mines to a mining company called Trevali Mining Corporation. The Trevali Mining Corporation is a mining company that digs up over 3,000 tons of zinc a day. The company however works in places like South America and Africa but was actually founded in Vancouver, British Columbia. (The town right next to where I was born) They intend on using the zinc for types of medicine with treating wounds. Zinc is also needed for human health and some people living with a deficiency of it prevents things in children like diarrhea and stunted growth. This helps us to connect and understand Africa by giving a more insight on how Africa's connection to other countries and allies are helping(?) the rest of the world. In class we also learned about how other African countries had relied heavily on mining. For example South Africa is the world leader of gold and diamonds. In conclusion this article was pretty cool. It made it interesting to hear about since I have a kind of connection with this article.
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Igor Espanhol's curator insight, March 15, 9:47 AM

"Mining and commodities trader Glencore (LON:GLEN) is selling its stakes in two zinc mines to Canada’s Trevali (TSX:TV) in a deal worth about $400 million that will make the later the first pure zinc company with operations in North and South America as well as Africa."

8A JonathanS's curator insight, March 24, 11:44 AM
This article is about how mining and commodities trader Glencore is selling its stakes in two zinc mines to Canada’s Trevali in a deal worth about $400 million that will make the later the first pure zinc company with operations in North and South America as well as Africa.With this sale, Glencore gives Trevali its 80% and 90% stakes respectively in the Namibia-based Rosh Pinah and the Perkoa mine located in Burkina Faso, while it also increases its direct holding in the Vancouver-based miner from 4% to 25%, getting two seats on the Trevali’s board. This also opens the door for the creation of a “multi-asset, low-cost global zinc producer,” whose output will double to approximately 410 million pounds per year, placing the company among the world’s top 10 zinc producers. Rosh Pinah opened in 1969 and is expected to have a further 14 years of operating life, while Perkoa is set to produce for another six years. Trevali, which already has operations in Canada and Peru, said the transaction is subject to regulatory approvals and is expected to close by July.

I think this wasn't really an interesting article but I surely learned a lot from it. It was quite fun to hear about all the improvements made to these mining companies and how successful they became. I think this connects to what we've learned in social studies because of all the illegal and unsafe mining going on. So it's nice to hear that some of these mining companies actually compromised and came up with a goof and fair solution and how all mining in Africa doesn't have to end with conflicts and wars. It's also nice to hear that these mines are actually well taken care of and that they are in safe conditions and that it;s all well sorted out.
Rescooped by 8A BenB from Mining, Drilling and Discovery
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'Fatality figures falling each year as South African mining sector targets 'zero harm' @investorseurope #mining 

'Fatality figures falling each year as South African mining sector targets 'zero harm' @investorseurope #mining  | Africa | Scoop.it
As the yearly recorded number of mining injuries and fatalities in South Africa continues to decrease, albeit at a slower pace in 2016 than in previous years, the focus of the industry shifts once again to renewed efforts to bring the number of fatalities to zero. However, as the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR), mining companies, trade unions and lobby groups continue to emphasise their collective goal of zero harm, 2017 is already out of the running as the year in which this goal will be achieved, owing to four fatalities occurring before the release of the 2016 figures.

Via Igor Espanhol
8A BenB's insight:
This article was about the current state of the mining industry of 2016 around the area of South Africa. The summary of it is the mining business is doing very well. The amount of deaths has decreased greatly, over 24%. Only 78 deaths were reported. The main cause was not being trapped in the mines like it used to be in 2014. It is now mainly falling to death and fires inside the mines. The owners of the mines are now targeting “zero harm” rate with as close to no deaths as they can during 2017. This helps connect and understand Africa since we were learning about crude oil from other scoop.it presentations along with mining appearing multiple times in social studies text books on how Africa produces lots of minerals like iron, gold, and diamonds to the rest of the world. In conclusion I think that it is good that mining is becoming safer and that the industry is recognizing the problems it has and actively trying to fix it, so far it seems to be working. This could lead to more people becoming miners and less unemployment overall in South Africa.
more...
8A AndrewS's curator insight, March 1, 8:44 PM
As the years past, number of mining injuries in Africa is less and less each year, but there are still people who are still getting injury. So they want to make the number of injuries zero. They don’t want anyone who mines in Africa to be injured. Fatalities increased from 112 in 2012 to 93 in 2013, 84 in 2014, 77 in 2015, and 73 in 2016. The number of fatalities on 2016, with 73 fatalities is lowest ever! The number of injuries also drop from 3138 in 2015 to 2662 in 2016, which shows that the mining industry managed to reduce the incidents by 15%. The major causes of these facilities is FoG (fall of ground) with 33%. The problem is that the health and safety in mines are not so go. So to summarize it they are trying to make the number of facilities and injury 0 in 2017. I think that this is a really good idea because according to the social study textbook. 40% of the goods that leave Africa are from mining (the other 60% are from farming) so mining is really important in Africa. This idea will help people become more focused at their job. So to summarize this I think it’s a really good idea, but I don’t think it will be easy to do. I think it will take years for them to decrease the number to 0.
8A BenB's curator insight, March 2, 8:18 AM
This article was about the current state of the mining industry of 2016 around the area of South Africa. The summary of it is the mining business is doing very well. The amount of deaths has decreased greatly, over 24%. Only 78 deaths were reported. The main cause was not being trapped in the mines like it used to be in 2014. It is now mainly falling to death and fires inside the mines. The owners of the mines are now targeting “zero harm” rate with as close no deaths as they can during 2017. This helps connect and understand Africa since we were learning about crude oil from other scoop.it presentations along with mining appearing multiple times in social studies text books on how Africa produces lots of minerals like iron, gold, and diamonds to the rest of the world. In conclusion I think that it is good that mining is becoming safer and that the industry is recognizing the problems it has and actively trying to fix it, so far it seems to be working. This could lead to more people becoming miners and less unemployment overall in South Africa.
8A LeonardC's curator insight, March 2, 9:23 AM
Mining conditions in South Africa are slowly decrease unlike past years. The Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) is trying to emphasize zero harm in 2017. The DMR pointed out, however, that more mining companies are achieving 12 fatality- free months with appliances improving. People say that the number of fatalities will keep on decreasing. While the platinum industry has the greatest decrease in incidence while the gold industry only gold industry had only a 3% drop. Overall there was a 5% drop in fatalities. More companies are trying to improve the fatality ratio easing tension between companies which makes the companies more focused on health and safety. Many companies are trying to implement more safety resources and procedures in their mine shafts. This will take a lot of time but if they continue to try, great outcomes can occur. This article connect to our lessons because we talked a lot about child slavery and how the working conditions are really bad but also harmful for the kids. In my opinion, the DMR should continue implementing better conditions to the mines because in Africa, mining is a really big industry and if it falls, the economy will really be affected.
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Recession-hit Nigeria targets economy to grow at annual 7 percent by 2020 #NigeriaEconomy

Recession-hit Nigeria targets economy to grow at annual 7 percent by 2020 #NigeriaEconomy | Africa | Scoop.it
Nigeria is targeting economic growth of at least 7% a year by 2020, the Ministry of Budget and National Planning said on Tuesday, a far cry from its current recession, the first in 25 years.

Via Comrade Moses
8A BenB's insight:
This article was about the improvement of the economy in Nigeria. Ever since inflation started about 11 years ago due to global crude oil prices dropping, which Nigeria's economy heavily relies on. Along with some corruption in the government, protesters, and the accessibility foreign currencies has been a large problem for Nigeria's economy. However gross domestic products (total value of goods produced and services provided in a country during one year.) started decreasing by 2.24% last year has now risen 7%. This 7% is being used to be part of a medium term economic plan to address some problems with Nigeria's economy. The budget ministry said “our goal is to have an economy with low inflation, stable exchange rates and diversified and inclusive growth.” Their new priority are
agriculture and food, security, energy, industrialization, and stabilizing the economy. If Nigeria's economy grows 7% every year only by 2020 it will have been a far cry from its current recession, the best in 25 years.

 This helped me learn more about Africa because we were learning about the economic struggles in countries like Zimbabwe which has the weakest currency in the world, with about 50 billion Zimbabwean dollars to be equal to around 33 U.S cents and 1.2 quadrillion Zimbabwean dollars worth around 4,000 U.S dollars. It also helps me understands how corruption can really hold a country back. Some examples of this are like Nigeria with its recently improving economy and Sierra Leone which caused a whole war. Charles Taylor the president of Liberia wanted Sierra Leone for the natural resources, specifically iron and diamonds. With the RUF (Revolutionary United Front) wanting delivery from a corrupt government and Charles Taylor wanting the natural resources of Sierra Leone they joined forces against a common enemy and fought the Sierra Leone government. (Charles Taylor did not have direct contact with any fighting or violence during the war but he was helping to supply the RUF with resources) The war lasted 11 years and caused other countries to get involved. The Nigerian intervention was the biggest aid to the Sierra Leone government. 2,000 Nigerian soldiers were stationed in Liberia with the intentions for a ceasefire between the two sides which had already been fighting for six years. When getting to Freetown (the capital of Sierra Leone) they were attacked by the RUF and were forced to aid the Sierra Leone government against the attack. South Africa also helped aid Sierra Leone with the help of a small private mercenary company called the Civil Cooperation Bureau which also supplied around 2,000 mercenaries to help with the war. With the mercenaries being paid with small percentages to mines and profitable resources inside the country and the Nigerian intervention, the war ended with the Sierra Leone government being victorious and the peace treaty being signed in 1999. However the conflict continued and is still going on today. Charles Taylor was then later charged for war crimes in 2007 and is still serving out his sentence today. This was all caused by corruption. This article was really good to hear about. It hopefully will stay at around 7% of gross domestic products to further increase the economy of the country. However for the protesters I think that there really should be a way to find a balance between what they have now and not so easy for corrupt politicians to come and swoop up all the resources and get away with it so easily. I understand it is very hard to make a change in a type of government system and still not everyone would agree with it but at least the politicians could stay true to themselves.
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Legalising rhino horn trade could stop poaching, suggests BBC presenter Adam Hart 

Legalising rhino horn trade could stop poaching, suggests BBC presenter Adam Hart  | Africa | Scoop.it
Rhino horn could be cut from live animals and sold legally to stop poaching, the BBC presenter and scientist Adam Hart has suggested.
8A BenB's insight:

This was a very interesting article to read. It explored the opinion that trading of rhino horn should be legalized for medicine and other reasons like benefiting the natives who still have it. It honestly is a very controversial idea that wouldn't benefit the rhinos but it would benefit people. Rhino horn is use for epilepsy medicine which is one point they use in this article. They say it would also allow people to remove the rhino horn without actually killing the rhino to use it more easily without killing the rhino. This article helps me understand Africa by recognizing the beautiful animals and their habitat and how they help the modern world today.


However this article was an absolute mess. It rocks back between two points so often that it was much to hard to realize whose side the author was on. The idea he supports as well for using rhinos as machines to produce horns was horrific. He leaves quotes in the article not stating they are quotes, the quotes themselves don't have dates or authors from people who wrote them. He goes from saying “This will result in the deaths of beautiful animals” to “you can dehorn a rhino quite easily” without little to no context. In conclusion this was a horrible article given to me by a horrible site. (I don't like scoop.it and I don’t want to use it ever again)

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