Advocacy and participatory planning
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Engaging the Heart and Mind: The Art of Selling Your Story

Engaging the Heart and Mind: The Art of Selling Your Story | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

Everyone has a story. Since the dawn of man, storytelling has become an art that evokes emotions and compels action and empathy from the direction of the artist. In many ways, the medium is the message and the true art is opening the hearts and minds of the listeners and turning them on to engagement. Once in “story mode,” people tend to let their guard down and begin to shape opinions and beliefs around the information they are given. And timing is everything- The window of opportunity to engage story mode can be as small as a tweet or as long as a meeting. After all, there can never be a connection without that initial acceptance of possibility and desire to continue down the path.

 

[The Hoffman Agency (@DailyBrew) rightfully asked in a tweet, "Where's the hero?")


Via Melanie Greenberg
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Conversations That Matter « how to save the world

Conversations That Matter « how to save the world | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

When I was younger, most of my waking life was consumed in conversations. In my work life, I learned that most learning occurs, and most decisions are made, in small group conversations, often ad hoc. I was persuaded that good conversation skills were the key to good relationships. I believed, in short, that conversation mattered.

 

Now that I’m no longer working, and rarely required to converse with anyone, I’ve come to believe that, as GB Shaw put it, “the biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place”. In retrospect, I would guess that most of the conversations I was party to over the years were incompetently conducted and largely a waste of time. The conversants, for the most part, had already decided what they believed or what needed to be done, and were just looking for reassurance. Or they were talking to hear themselves think, and not listening to anyone else. There was almost never any real exchange of information, or ideas, or perspectives, despite the earnest attempts of the conversants to convey these things. Our languages are not very good at that, and the complicity of creatures that make up what we believe to be “us”, as individuals, rarely allows our minds — their minds really — to focus more than a small bit of our attention on anything not directly relevant to the needs of the moment. And our culture does its best to obfuscate and distort the meaning of words and the events of the day, so that most of what we manage to convey is probably lies anyway.


Via Gary Walter, David Hain, Melanie Greenberg
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Community Storytelling Network, Neighborhood Context, and Civic Engagement: A Multilevel Approach - Kim - 2006 - Human Communication Research - Wiley Online Library

Community Storytelling Network, Neighborhood Context, and Civic Engagement: A Multilevel Approach - Kim - 2006 - Human Communication Research - Wiley Online Library | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

From a communication infrastructure theory perspective, the current study examined individuals’ civic engagement (neighborhood belonging, collective efficacy, and civic participation) as influenced by 2 multilevel components of the communication

infrastructure—an integrated connectedness to a storytelling network (ICSN) and the residential context—focusing on ethnic heterogeneity and residential stability. Our multilevel analyses show that ICSN is the most important individual-level factor in civic engagement—neighborhood belonging, collective efficacy, and civic participation—after controlling for other individual-level and neighborhood-level factors. In both ethnically homogeneous and heterogeneous areas and in both stable and unstable areas, ICSN is an important factor in civic engagement. As contextual factors, residential stability positively affects neighborhood belonging and collective efficacy, and ethnic heterogeneity is negatively related to collective efficacy. Our data do not show any direct contextual effects of residential stability or ethnic heterogeneity on civic participation. However, our HLM analysis showed that the relative importance of ICSN for the likelihood of participation in civic activities is significantly higher in unstable or ethnically heterogeneous areas than in stable or ethnically homogeneous areas.

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Connected Hispanics & Civic Engagement | The Hispanic Institute

Connected Hispanics & Civic Engagement | The Hispanic Institute | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 17, 2011)  Hispanics outpace other demographic groups as users of mobile phones and social media, according to a report released today by The Hispanic Institute.
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Population & Environment, Volume 24, Number 1 - SpringerLink

Despite our pretensions to science, modern industrial society is as myth-bound and mystical as any that has preceded it. Our prevailing cultural myth includes a dangerous vision of global sustainability and poverty reduction centered on unlimited economic expansion, free trade and technological fixes. This paper dissects the modern myth, exposing its conceptual flaws and practical failings. It then proposes an alternative conceptual framework for development derived from ecological economics and ecological footprint analysis. The new framework recognizes that the human enterprise is a subsystem of the ecosphere whose growth is constrained by biophysical limits. If humanity is to seize control of its destiny it must arise above wishful thinking and tribal instinct. Global society needs a new cultural myth rooted in humanity's unique claim to intelligence and self-awareness in the face of danger. Human security depends on equitable development—not growth—within the means of nature. Sustainability with social justice can be achieved only through an unprecedented level of international cooperation rooted in a sense of compassion for both other peoples and other species.

growth economics - ecological economics - eco-footprints - myth

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The New Discipline of Engagement Planning | ClickZ

The New Discipline of Engagement Planning | ClickZ | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org

 

This is why generic "tips" won't always work and measurement sklls are very much needed.

 

The point that caught my eye:

 

Engagement planning is based on audience insights. Engagement planning begins with understanding audience needs and wants in real time. The use of social media performance data, conversation data, search data, and site analytics data can be gathered and analyzed to help answer critical questions: who is our audience? What do they need and want? What are they searching for and talking about, and how do they discover what they want?
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How Urban Farming can Transform our Cities & our Agricultural System

How Urban Farming can Transform our Cities & our Agricultural System | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

As concerns mount over the accessibility and quality of meals in cities, urban agriculture is becoming a practical solution to give communities more choice—all while helping address greenhouse gas emissions from centralized agriculture.
With more than 80 percent of the American population living in metropolitan centers, urban farming has the ability to dramatically enhance economic growth, increase food quality and build healthier communities.


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Henry Jenkins explains his vision of transmedia and audience engagement

Henry Jenkins explains his vision of transmedia and audience engagement | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

Mélanie Bourdaa: "In Jenkins’ view, five logics are contributing to the emergence of transmedia and the phenomenon of increased fan participation (‘fandom’):"

 

The logic of entertainment The logic of social connection The logic of experts The logic of immersion The logic of identification

 


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An Integrated Approach to Global Change

An Integrated Approach to Global Change | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it
The guidelines mentioned above can be applied to the study of global change by combining three domains of knowledge: (1) Complex Systems Research; (2) Cognitive Sciences; and (3) Earth Systems Sciences.

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Community Participation in the Real World: Opportunities and Pitfalls in New Governance Spaces

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Stir It Up

Stir It Up | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it
Stir It Up--written by renowned activist and trainer Rinku Sen--identifies the key priorities and strategies that can help advance the mission of any social change group.
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Can a Highway Median Become an Alluring Public Space?

Can a Highway Median Become an Alluring Public Space? | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it
That's the question in Miami, where a design firm has created a temporary pop-up park, complete with sod and seating.
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Occupy Research Demographic and Political Participation Survey

The Occupy Research General Demographic and Political Participation Survey (ORGS) aimed to gather information about the demographics of participants, as well as forms of civic and political participation in the Occupy movement.
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The Power of Deep Connection & Why It's So Important Today

I love the word serendipity and today I happened to see a tweet chat #pochat and I began following the stream. I met a man who lives and breathes what I hold dear to my heart - meaningful connections that lead to powerful communities.

 

 After interacting with Bobby and listening to this talk, I could have said this myself.

 

"Bobby Umar is a human teddy bear and a personal diary. People always want to hug him and share deep, personal thoughts with him, even after a first meeting"

 

This inspiring talk is all about the 5 c's of connection - they are

 

**Caring

 

**Communication

 

**Connection

 

**Community

 

**Change

 

Today we're living with massive change in every area of our lives. It's an exciting time but it is also a time of confusion and anxiety. No person can afford to be a lone wolf, we all need each other.

 

I loved this talk, what he is saying is what gets me out of bed in the morning. It is my purpose and it was so wonderful to hear him speak and articulate what I am trying to do as well. There are so many wonderful people out there who have the same vision, who are different from me and you, we all have something to learn from each other.


"What I can't do alone, we can do together"

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions"

 

Listen to the talk here: [http://bit.ly/S40CRL]


Via janlgordon, Melanie Greenberg
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9 Essential Green Elements for the Development of Sustainable Cities

9 Essential Green Elements for the Development of Sustainable Cities | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

Many cities are coming to the realization that creating a smart and sustainable city means ultimately attaining a high level of economic efficiency, a high quality of life, a highly desirable place in which to live and do business, and a meaningful commitment to environmental responsibility.

But what really makes for a green or sustainable city?  And how can sometimes highly diverse urban areas attain it?


LEED buildings and even LEED neighborhoods are surely a good thing, but they are not a sufficient thing to declare a municipality sustainable.  This is an overview of the essential elements (there are many more, but these are the most basic):

Committing to greenBuilding greenBuying greenPowering greenConserving nearby (and creating internal) green landscapesProtecting green:  both water quality and water quantityLocating green:  creating a compact, walkable, interconnected, mixed-use communityMoving green:  diversifying transportation and increasing accessibility(Not) wasting green:  getting to zero on the production of waste

 

Read the complete article for more on the green elements listed above...


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Noor Fatima's curator insight, April 12, 2013 1:05 PM

Exactly :)

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, April 12, 2013 7:12 PM

100% Green is not fooling around.

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Local Capitalism, Civic Engagement, and Socioeconomic Well-Being

Local Capitalism, Civic Engagement, and Socioeconomic Well-Being | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

This analysis is designed to extend a newly emerging body of social stratification research grounded in theories of civil society. The goal of this larger body of research and writing is to provide an alternative social and economic development paradigm to the dominant neoclassical/rational choice/human capital perspective. In an economic world woven together by global market forces, local social structures can become key variables that influence which places prosper and which decline. We begin by hypothesizing that local capitalism and civic engagement variables are associated with positive socioeconomic outcomes (higher income levels and lower levels of income inequality, poverty, and unemployment). To test these notions, we employ data on more than 3,000 U.S. counties. Net of the substantial effects of the control variables, three measures of local civic society —small manufacturing establishments, family farms, and civically engaged religious denominations — vary as hypothesized in three of four models. The performance of these local capitalism and civic engagement variables suggests a robust association with beneficial local socioeconomic outcomes. We conclude by outlining needed research on civil society that would contribute further to a social development perspective.                 

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National Capital Planning Commission Meeting - October 6, 2011

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The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Cities

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Cities | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

1. Be Proactive. There’s much any city can do today. Even without sufficient budget or authorization from ‘senior levels’ of government, every city has a full menu of things that can be carried out immediately, generating positive momentum and goodwill. Business rewards the active entrepreneur, and the public desperately wants active cities. The rewards are great.

2. Plan – Plan Right. All cities carry out master plans for their key services, long-term infrastructure needs, and land use planning. Before starting these plans, the end needs to be clear. They are guidance documents, aspirational, and ways to rally supporters and give fair hearing to opponents. But a plan, no matter how good, can never be seen as a finished product. Before starting the plan an agreement is needed that the city is moving forward on this issue: the plan is the vehicle to bring along as many supporters as possible and identify potential potholes and trouble en route. Like a city, good plans are living documents.

 

Click the link for more on effective cities...


Via Toni Sánchez, association concert urbain, Lauren Moss
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Park life: the evolving approach to designing urban public space

Park life: the evolving approach to designing urban public space | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

It could be argued that the pinnacle of urban landscape architecture was reached in seventeenth century France and the French formal gardens of Jacques Boyceau and André Le Nôtre, or in Britain in the ninenteenth century, when Joseph Paxton and John Nash were transforming former Royal Hunting grounds into places for Victorian gentry to promenade.

Contemporary urban architects and designers are rarely afforded the same amount of space, money and time as their antecedents and are more often tasked with transforming abandoned plots, redundant structures or characterless inner city areas into suitable places for public recreation. Here, Architonic looks at some recent successes that add value to their surroundings by pushing the boundaries of park design.

Finding new spaces in towns and cities that can be turned into communal parks is extremely difficult with every available plot in such high demand and the reuse or re-appropriation of existing land has become a popular alternative. The shining example of this practice is New York’s hugely popular High Line development, which has converted a disused freight rail line elevated above the streets of Manhattan into a popular park and walkway...


Via Lauren Moss
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San Francisco To Help Citizens Create “Better Streets”

San Francisco To Help Citizens Create “Better Streets” | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it
One of Jane Jacobs’ most valuable contributions to the understanding of cities was her faith in the wisdom of the urban dweller. She argued that the physical city—and any approach to city planning—could not be separated from the wisdom of each individual inhabitant, “People who know well such animated city streets will know how it is. I am afraid people who do not will always have it a little wrong in their heads, like the old prints of rhinoceroses made from travelers’ descriptions of rhinoceroses.” The complication arising from Jacobs’ argument is simple though difficult to solve; how can we plan a city when planning is one part abstraction and abstraction removes us from Jacobs’ precious “real life” mentality?

 

A step towards solving this contradiction is sfbetterstreets.org, a website launched last week by the City of San Francisco. Developed by the San Francisco Planning Department in conjunction with other city agencies, the website is part of the city’s larger, “Better Streets” initiative. The legislative concept, described in San Francisco’s Better Streets Plan, is to create streets “designed and built to strike a balance between all users regardless of physical abilities or mode of travel… maximizing features for the comfort, usability, and aesthetics of people walking.”


Via Lauren Moss
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How “Small Change” Leads to Big Change: Social Capital and Healthy Places

How “Small Change” Leads to Big Change: Social Capital and Healthy Places | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

According to Dr. Richard Jackson, a pioneering public health advocate and former CDC official now serving as the Chair of Environmental Health Sciences at UCLA, the idea that buildings, streets, and public spaces play a key role in the serious public health issues that we face in the US “has undergone a profound sea change in the past few years. It’s gone from sort of a marginal, nutty thing to becoming something that’s common sense for a lot of people.”


Via Lauren Moss
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Walking the Edge of Immorality: It’s Time for Community Organizers to Expose Corruption Within Our Own Ranks. - Cockroach People

Walking the Edge of Immorality: It’s Time for Community Organizers to Expose Corruption Within Our Own Ranks. - Cockroach People | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it

We organizers tend not to badmouth our colleagues in public. In some ways we protect our own. But the recent ACORN prostitution scandal has me worried about our profession. Prior to the uproar, I had hoped that President Obama’s rise to power would make community organizing a respected sector of the workforce rather than some ill-defined stepping-stone for young people. But we seem to be losing ground again. Of course, many right-wingers were already belittling community organizing as a profession during the Obama campaign–to the chagrin of some conservative community organizers. But the recent attacks on ACORN are especially damaging. While we organizers have a responsibility to counter the misinformation of right-wing pundits and politicians who attack our colleagues (though Rachel Maddow probably did a better job of defending ACORN‘s work than any of us ever could), we must also be willing to clean house on our end. If we are going to survive the current tsunami of attacks, our own conduct, as Gandhi often said, must be above reproach.

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Indicators for Sustainable Communities: A Strategy Building on Complexity Theory and Distributed Intelligence

Indicators for Sustainable Communities: A Strategy Building on Complexity Theory and Distributed Intelligence | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it
(2000). Indicators for Sustainable Communities: A Strategy Building on Complexity Theory and Distributed Intelligence. Planning Theory & Practice: Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 173-186.
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American Journal of Community Psychology, Volume 8, Number 2 - SpringerLink

Community and individual difference characteristics as influences on initial participation
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Bridging Interests and Community: Advocacy Planning and the Challenges of Deliberative Democracy

Bridging Interests and Community: Advocacy Planning and the Challenges of Deliberative Democracy | Advocacy and participatory planning | Scoop.it
(1994). Bridging Interests and Community: Advocacy Planning and the Challenges of Deliberative Democracy. Journal of the American Planning Association: Vol. 60, No. 2, pp. 153-158.
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