advertising creativity
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Marketers Don't Need to Be More Creative

Marketers Don't Need to Be More Creative | advertising creativity | Scoop.it

... Unfortunately, that’s the wrong question. If there’s anything all that chaos and competition of the past five years should have taught agencies, it’s that too much “creativity” celebrated by marketers and advertisers really isn’t. Advertising creativity has long been a bit of a con job; the media world is filled with costly creative that neither builds brands nor sells products. The better argument is that traditional advertising and marketing firms have pathologically overinvested in creativity while consistently underinvesting in meaningful metrics. An even better case might be made that the multimedia successes of Google, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Facebook, and so on, highlight just how flaccid and ineffective most creative advertising and market work has been. What’s the secret sauce these technologies all have in common? Their creativity is measurable, trackable, and accountable. That’s a winning combination. If you’re a brand manager or CMO, that’s what you should care about....


Via Jeff Domansky
Jay Zeng Jian's insight:

The articles stresses that the media world is filled with costly creative that neither builds brands nor sells products. traditional advertising and marketing firms have overinvested in creativity  while consistently underinvesting in meaningful metrics. I feel that today's consumers are very tech-savy and they can easily identify the lack of credibility that some marketers attempt to facade with creativity. Therefore, marketers should consider investing their resources in technology, data and accountability to establish the brand's credibility.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, June 28, 2014 1:07 AM

Creativity without measurement doesn't deliver results.

Geert Stox's curator insight, June 29, 2014 6:34 PM

I don't completely agree, but I understand why he states it.

Abby Brooking's curator insight, September 24, 2014 9:19 PM

Creativity in Advertising:

Is is possible that businesses can be too create? An attention-grabbing alternative to creativity in advertising is that marketers are been told they do not need more creativity due to the stress and chaos it causes to competition, arguing that traditional advertising and marketing firms have suffered from over investing in creative advertising while consistently under investing in meaningful  metrics.

 

With a conclusion that the key to success for social media sites such as Google, Facebook, Instagram is their creativity is measurable, trackable, and accountable. That’s a winning combination; this is what brand managers should be focusing on.

 

 

The key judging by this article is the accountability, which enables greater creativity as creativity becomes less of a focus point than a measurable means to a business end.

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The Modern Marketer: Part Artist, Part Scientist [INFOGRAPHIC]

The Modern Marketer: Part Artist, Part Scientist [INFOGRAPHIC] | advertising creativity | Scoop.it
The marketing profession is always changing. Long gone are the Mad Men-style era of advertising which championed creativity over execution.
Jay Zeng Jian's insight:

The article explains that marketers need to be multifaceted, exploiting both their creative and scientific talents. Therefore, it also shows that todays marketers cannot think singularly anymore as it is getting increasingly difficult to find the best way to grab consumers attention. I feel that modern marketers have to quickly adapt to thrive in this rapidly-changing marketing landscape. 

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Taglines Are Bygone Marketing Relics | Adweek

Taglines Are Bygone Marketing Relics | Adweek | advertising creativity | Scoop.it

The death of the tagline may be overstating the situation, but there’s a growing school of thought that considers taglines as bygone marketing relics.

 

There’s certainly evidence that taglines have diminished in importance. Many of the most admired brands—Starbucks, Whole Foods, Lululemon, Nordstrom—don’t have them. Some brands whose taglines helped propel them to greatness no longer use them. Apple hasn’t used “Think different” for years, and the sign-off to its most recent TV ads, “Designed by Apple in California,” is less a tagline than a closing salutation.

 

Of The 100 Most Influential Taglines Since 1948, as listed by TaglineGuru.com, two-thirds ran before 1980. Half of Forbes’ Best-Loved Advertising Taglines ran before 1975. While some may attribute these findings to a general decline in creativity in advertising over the last 30 years, it’s not as clear and simple as that.

Jay Zeng Jian's insight:

The articles explains that companies have done away with taglines and pithy phrases in their ads because things like targeted social media campaign can produce the same impact or even better. It focuses on the need for flexible branding to catch consumers attention in todays world. In my opinion, taglines provides the company a good starting platform to build their brand but later as they become more successful, they can integrate into using flexible branding.It is also worth noting that the ability to be 'flexible' comes from the strength they have gained by first building some equity the old fashioned way.

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How to Assess an Ad's Creativity

How to Assess an Ad's Creativity | advertising creativity | Scoop.it

Most measures of creativity are based on the work of psychologist Joy Paul Guilford (1897-1987), who defined creativity as the ability to think differently along a number of clearly defined dimensions. Building on Guilford's work, psychologist Ellis Paul Torrance (1915-2003), probably the international leader in creativity research, developed the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT), which are used in the business world and in education to assess individuals' capacities for creativity.

In the early 2000s, Torrance's metrics were adapted to an advertising context by a group around communications researcher Robert Smith from Indiana University. Focusing only on the components that are directly related to how consumers consume and process advertisements, Smith's group defined advertising creativity as the degree of divergence from a norm along five dimensions: originality, flexibility, elaboration, synthesis, and artistic value.

As we describe in our HBR article, we used Smith's scale to assess the creativity of 437 TV advertising campaigns in Germany. We recruited a panel of representative consumers and asked them to give a response on a scale of one to seven to a series of questions. From these responses we were able to assess the various ads and we found that there was significant divergence across ads in terms of the type of creativity that were most salient. Here's how we defined and assessed the five dimensions:

Originality

An original ad comprises elements that are rare, surprising, or move away from the obvious and commonplace. The focal element here is uniqueness of the ideas or features contained in the ad. To assess originality we asked three questions:


Via Charles Tiayon
Jay Zeng Jian's insight:

The article mentions that advertising creativity can be defined along five dimensions: originality, flexibility, elaboration, synthesis, and artistic value. However, i feel that the audience who sees the advertisement may not always be the target audience that the company desires. Hence, they may not understand the message that the company is trying to put across through the ad. Bad products exceptional advertising can still fail regardless.

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Betty QY Fang's curator insight, September 13, 2014 10:31 PM

As we all know creativity is important to create an ad to get more attention and increase the effectiveness. This article well reveals five dimensions to access an ad's creativity, which are originality, flexibility,  elaboration, synthesis, and artistic value. The authors selected four clippers to identify each dimension and explained that each dimension is accessed with three questions. 

 

The cone idea closely links to another article "Creativity in advertising, when it works and when it doesn't". In that article authors also mentioned those five dimensions, and they found that the dimensions have varying levels of influence on sales, and the different combination of creativity leads to varying results. Study shows the most-used combination, flexibility plus elaboration, actually is one of the least effective, while the most effective combination, originality plus elaboration, had the most impact. This approach can be adopted in many products and industries, and provide marketers a good tool to measure the result.

 

This is a very interesting insight to guild marketers to use different elements to create advertising to reach the most effectiveness. 

Abby Brooking's curator insight, September 24, 2014 8:43 PM

Creativity in Advertising:

Ad creativity is measured by a variety of different aspects to determine the success or failure of a brand/product, these include:

 

Firstly, originality, unique ads embraces elements that are extraordinary, or different from the obvious derivative style. The focal element here is uniqueness of the ideas or features contained in the ad to emphasis and create a remembrance for the brand. Secondly, flexibility, this is seen as and ad’s ability to link a product to a range of different use or ideas. Thirdly, elaboration, these types of ads contain unexpected details ideas, and fourthly, synthesis, an ad that is blended using distinct items or ideas. Lastly, artistic value, are ads with a high level of imagination, that are appealing verbal, visual and sound, and can contain clever dialogue, unique and relatable music and colour that are somehow memorable.

These were interestingly analysed by the observation of different ads including Cokes Happiness Factory, Wriggleys and more under each section, these included questions to help understand how important these observations are when advertising a brand, such as:

- Is the ad out of the ordinary/unique?

- Does it contain different ideas?

- Does it shift from one idea to another?

- Does it contain unusual connections?

- Is the ad visually or verbally distinctive?

- Does it make ideas come to life graphically or verbally?

Kathleen Smith's curator insight, September 27, 2014 2:52 AM

This article that was written on the Harvard Business Review website talks about the five dimensions in terms of assessing an ad's creativity. The five dimensions are: originality, flexibility, elaboration, synthesis, and artistic value. A researcher from Indiana University, Robert Smith’s scale was used to assess the creativity of 437 TV advertising campaigns in Germany. They defined advertising creativity as the degree of divergence from a norm along five dimensions. Every ad which is created must carry the elements mentioned in this post. The article also shows a few different ad videos to show the difference between them and to show how creative they are.