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Geosynthetics Market by Types, Applications & Geography - Global Trends ... - PR Newswire (press release)

Geosynthetics Market by Types, Applications & Geography - Global Trends ...
PR Newswire (press release)
Geosynthetics are widely used in civil engineering, construction industries, environmental applications, and coastal engineering.
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Climate Change | LearnStuff

Climate Change | LearnStuff | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
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Extremely concise source on climate change. 97 percent of scientist agree that human activity is the major contributing factor, But 72 percent of the media push skepticism.  


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Market Segmentation

Market Segmentation | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Nielsen Prizm is a tool used by companies to analyze their customers spending habits, lifestyle choices and spatial patterns.  Using their Zip Code Look Up feature, you can search any zip code to g...

 

This is an interesting glimpse into how market research analysts view neighborhoods, geography and spatial analysis.  This economic and cultural data has a wide range of uses (albeit with some serious limitations). 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, neighborhood, place, economic, consumption, spatial, mapping. 


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CIM Academy's curator insight, July 17, 2015 5:13 AM

Segmentation is a key element in strategic planning. This article discusses the importance of market segmentation and provides some key insights. 

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Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S.

Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S. | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
As immigration levels from Mexico have plunged, the number of new arrivals from Asia has increased.

 

Don't listen to the election year rhetoric about immigration policies if you want to understand the shifting demographic profile of immigrants entering the United States.  For years now, immigration from Latin America has been at incredibly low levels mainly from 1) limited job market in the U.S. (weakening the pull factor), 2) increased deportation (weakening the pull factor) and 3) a sharp drop in Mexican birth rates (weakening the push factor).  What other push and pull factors are influences this change in the demographic profile of migrants?   Considering that Asian migrants are more highly educated that the rest of the American population (and Hispanics have less education than the general U.S. population), how will this change the labor market within the different sectors of the economy?


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 11:46 AM
If you just listen to politicians you'd never get your facts straight. This here is a prime example of that. It can't hurt to have better educated immigrants, according to the statistics, but it may not be long before our citizens are crying out that the higher paying jobs are no longer in abundance. This could easily effect the demand for schooled and skilled job seekers, in an already damaged job market.
Brandon Murphy's comment, July 12, 2012 6:14 AM
It's not even just politicians that give you false data, media outlets such as FOX news would never reveal information like this. I agree Roland, there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a better educated immigrant population.
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5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...

 

This article by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve the world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 

 

Technology-Phones mean freedomHealth-Healthy communities prosperEconomy-Green energy equals good businessEquality-Women ruleJustice-The fight for the future is now

 

Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   


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A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S.

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S. | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Are more and more people in the western world dropping off the radar and becoming the invisible poor or is the opposite happening?  We recently heard that an astounding 46 million Americans are officially below the poverty line (That's $23,050/year for a family of four according to the official sources).  That number really caught our eye and as such we decided to do a little more digging to help put some more facts and figures around it.  Above is a nice visualization of the results we came up with."


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Ivan Koh's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:37 AM

This is my insight using See-Think-Wonder.
From this statistic, i can see alot of statistic about the number of people who are poor and the people's opinion related to poverty and welfare. In the article, i can see that 46million american are considered to be poor, and form the authors opinion, to prevent porverty, we should manage our wealth and make sure that we earn more than we spend.

I think that from the statistics, most people are poor mostly due to the fact that  they were uneducated in alot of ways. From the statistics, 1.2 million students drop out from high school every year. Thus, these people were mostly uneducated and cannot find a proper job, leading to drugs and borrowing of money. i also think that most people are poor because they are lazy and do not want to help themselves, as agreed by half of the americans that the poor are not doing enough to help themselves, and by 43% of americans that people who are poor can find a job if they are willing to work.

This article and statistics makes me wonder why american governments are not doing enough to educate students the importance of jobs and studies. Because people who are poor can actually work, but are too lazy to do it, this also makes me wonder why the government are giving money to the poor when they are able to help themselves 

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:36 AM

The insight of this article merely showed that more and more people does not really have  a good financial health, which also has translated into people wer e "invisible poor" especially those living in the western world. Comparison had been made on its poverty line between USA and UK statistics.

In my opinion, managing a country's budget its not an easy task, this is because a country need competitive global presence and to boost the economy. People need to produce more and more services outside its own country.

I have often thought that a country's population does have an impact on a country's economic growth.

Tim Stark's curator insight, October 24, 2015 9:54 PM

Great visual for economics and sociology courses

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Containerization Shaped Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today. 


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Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 7:48 PM

Globalization has connected the world in such a way that we hadn't thought possible. This idea has created rising economies all over the world and has made transport of goods and services move faster and continues to increase this rate with advances in technology. Containerization is a staple of globalization and without it, none of these products would be able to get from country to country. In essence it has developed the world of import and exports. To add to this success, globalization has also created jobs and communities which revolve heavily around the transport of goods. It saves time by using massive containers to move goods and it creates opportunities in places where it had not been possible before. 

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:45 AM

I believe this video is very interesting. It tells us that everything we have today is thanks to globalization and the reason we have it so fast is because of shipping containers! In the video it told me that before my time it was impossible to get swordfish from Japan or cheeses from France, but now thanks to globalization it is all possible. Globalization is even behind the reason how our phones were made! 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:28 AM

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today.  This is a very useful video.  

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This Is For Everyone Who Says Obamacare Is Creating A Nation Of Part-Time Workers

This Is For Everyone Who Says Obamacare Is Creating A Nation Of Part-Time Workers | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
One of the big memes over the last year was that Obamacare was creating a nation of part-time workers, as companies reduced workers' hours below the level at which companies would be obligated to provide health insurance.
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The Voices of China's Workers

TED Talks In the ongoing debate about globalization, what's been missing is the voices of workers -- the millions of people who migrate to factories in China and other emerging countries to make goods sold all over the world.


Our collective understanding of modern industrialization and globalization needs to go beyond the binary of "oppressors" and "victims."  This lecture explores the voices and lives of Chinese workers that we so often simply see as simply victims of a system, but are full of ambition and agency. 

 

Tags: industry, globalization, labor, China, TED. 


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Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 2:55 PM
In these Chinese factories, they don't view these jobs as harsh or poor treatment because this is better than how they would be doing back in their villages. They want these jobs so bad because they will give them a better life. Also, you have to remember that not all of these Chinese factory workers want to have an iPhone or a Coach purse or Nike shoes, because those things don't have any worth in their culture.
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:26 PM

The plight of Chinese workers today is incredibly great. This TED talks explains the situations many in China find themselves in the terrible conditions they must work in. While us in the west see this as unthinkable China's model for success and expansion comes at the cost of their workforce who are subjugated to poor working conditions as very low pay. The real hope for this to change is for the nation as a whole to become wealthy enough that these workers will be able to demand fair wages and work environments. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:08 PM

These workers do see their jobs as opportunities. This video is a great eye opener for people who tend to fall into the trap of looking at globalization as a system of haves and have nots. 

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Climate Change Video Guide

Climate Change Video Guide | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
An in-depth, multimedia look at climate change, its global impact, and efforts to combat it.

 

This guide on climate change from the Council on Foreign Relations (independent think tank) covers many of the geopolitical, economic and environmental issues that confront the Earth as global temperatures rise.  Rather than produce a full length feature film, they have organized the this as an interactive video, allowing the user to get short (a couple of minutes) answer to specific questions about the science, foreign policy or economic ramifications of adapting to climate change. 

 

Tags: climate change, environmental adaption, economic, industry.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 27, 2012 8:21 AM
Thanks for sharing this Giovanni!!
Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, November 27, 2012 8:38 AM
Thanks to you, Seth! :-)
Jose Sepulveda's comment, January 13, 2013 8:58 AM
Very good information, Thanks!
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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This article is funny because we were always worried about illegal immigrants entering the U.S from Mexico, and look at it now, Mexicans don’t even want to come to the U.S because they say they are better off staying in Mexico. I never even knew this; that the migration were decreasing as well. But I can relate to this; I have some family members in Portugal, and they don’t want to move here for a better life, they’d rather just stay in Portugal. The U.S isn’t really attractive to people because we are enforcing such rules!!! Well, this is what the U.S wants, to stop illegal immigrants from coming; well, we are getting that because Mexicans don’t want to come!! Also, there hasn’t been much childbirth, so that is a major factor because there are less people, and that will lead to less people trying to get into the U.S. Since education and employment have expanded in Mexico, there really is no need for Mexicans to enter the U.S. They will be better off there!! It is also much more dangerous to enter the U.S now because we have many officials guarding the border. The U.S just doesn’t look like the dreamland anymore; besides, if Mexico has more there now, then they can stay there!! In my opinion, the U.S isn’t a dreamland anymore and the economy has gone downhill!!

Stephanie Cordeiro


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 2014 5:58 PM

I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:14 PM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.

 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:11 PM

(Mexico topic 4)

Unlike other articles and videos, this one seems to possess a different "tone" towards the recent drop in immigration. It seems to imply that the drop in immigration will be mutually beneficial to both the US and Mexico. Mexico would benefit from having more workers to help grow its emerging economy, and the US would have fewer Welfare dependents. I'm not saying that I necessarily agree or disagree with this viewpoint, but I do find it to be a very unique take on the situation. I wonder if the reduction in immigration into the US has allowed more funds to be diverted away from collection and deportation to an increased emphasis on security and patrol efforts? In other words, I think that it is a possibility that the United States was, figuratively speaking, too busy "scooping water from the boat" to get around to "plugging the leak".

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The global debt clock

The global debt clock | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Authoritative weekly newspaper focusing on international politics and business news and opinion.

 

Tags: Economic, currency, visualization.


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Guillaume Decugis's comment, September 6, 2012 3:06 PM
Remember when we used to talk about the 3rd-world debt being a problem? (Back when the term 3rd world was actually not politically incorrect...) Well, this map clearly shows, debt is a 1st-world problem now...

Awesome map Seth! Thanks for sharing.
Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, September 2, 2014 1:42 AM

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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This is an excellent source for the under-report DECLINE of undocumented migration into the United States.   "Economic, demographic and social changes in Mexico are suppressing illegal immigration as much as the poor economy or legal crackdowns in the United States."


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 2014 5:58 PM

I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:14 PM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.

 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:11 PM

(Mexico topic 4)

Unlike other articles and videos, this one seems to possess a different "tone" towards the recent drop in immigration. It seems to imply that the drop in immigration will be mutually beneficial to both the US and Mexico. Mexico would benefit from having more workers to help grow its emerging economy, and the US would have fewer Welfare dependents. I'm not saying that I necessarily agree or disagree with this viewpoint, but I do find it to be a very unique take on the situation. I wonder if the reduction in immigration into the US has allowed more funds to be diverted away from collection and deportation to an increased emphasis on security and patrol efforts? In other words, I think that it is a possibility that the United States was, figuratively speaking, too busy "scooping water from the boat" to get around to "plugging the leak".