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New Era for Ohio Adoptees Began Today

New Era for Ohio Adoptees Began Today | Adoption | Scoop.it

Ohio Governor John Kasich signed Substitute Senate Bill 23 into law, granting 400,000 Ohio adoptees born January 1, 1964 - September 18, 1996, access to their original birth certificates.

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Identity in Adoption, a Right Not a Privilege - The Donaldson Adoption Institute

Adoption is a unique journey and our needs in this experience will differ. But our rights should never differ from those who are not adopted. Our humanity is the same and both the laws and perceptions that surround us must start reflecting that.
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What is forced adoption?

What is forced adoption? | Adoption | Scoop.it
As Insight looks at the experience of fathers who had no say in the forced adoption of their children, what was the practice that traumatised so many young parents from the 1950s through to the 1970s?  So great was its legacy and negative impact, it prompted the Australian government to issue a national apology in 2013. 
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Australian immigration citizenship crackdown leaves overseas adoptees in limbo

Australian immigration citizenship crackdown leaves overseas adoptees in limbo | Adoption | Scoop.it
She has voted in 10 federal elections, worked for ministers and travelled the world as an Australian national. Now immigration is refusing to reissue he
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With regards to the latest media article that has been published over the weekend (http://www.smh.com.au/…/unintended-consequence-how-australi…), the public and people affected by intercountry adoption will now be quite aware of changes to processes when obtaining or renewing an Australian Passport. I’m advised by Fed Govt, this is a change in rule around “Evidence" for Passport application. What is required now is proof of Australian Citizenship. If you don’t have a Citizenship Certificate, you need to apply for Citizenship using this form: https://www.border.gov.au/Forms/Documents/119.pdf If you are having any specific problems completing this form or want to talk to someone about issues in applying for your Passport or Citizenship Certificate, feel free to contact the 1800 Hotline http://www.intercountryadoption.gov.au and talk to a social worker who will coordinate and support you thru’ the process. A full update will be provided by Federal Government hopefully by CLOB today on their website: http://www.intercountryadoption.gov.au/ Please feel free to distribute this around so people know where to look for Federal Government guidance on this issue. Cheers Lynelle Long W: www.intercountryadopteevoices.com FB: https://www.facebook.com/intercountryadopteevoices
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Adoption Conference New Zealand | ARMS (Victoria)

Adoption Conference New Zealand | ARMS (Victoria) | Adoption | Scoop.it
 In January 2016 Dorothy attended the Conference in New Zealand on Adoption as our representative Dorothy took a handout/submission from Arms and distributed it to everyone at the Conference. The first page of the handout has a fabulous photo of the Arms banner and a description of who Arms is. The body of the handout is as follows “Adoption and the creation of a child with the intention of forming another family has been a highly contested space for over 50 years. The voices of all the parties, including those of surrogate mothers and commissioning couples have been extensively heard, although perhaps only within the smaller community of those interested in out of home care or the creation of children. Whilst research has been critically important in bringing the underlying issues into focus, it’s highly relevant to remember that all researchers come to a contested space with a set of values that inform their approach to their work. The Australian experience is particularly important because we have led the world in an advancement of understanding the impact of adoption and by creating legislation around inter-country adoption and surrogacy that in particular protects the interests of the child. That notion also – the best interests of the child – is in itself a contested idea. The United Nations makes it very clear what serves the best interests of the child: The child shall have the right from birth to know and be cared for by his or her parents Parties undertake to respect the right of the child and to preserve his or her identity including family relations as recognised by law without unlawful interference. However, the law in many countries allows natural parents to be erased from birth certificates and the documents sealed, which is contradictory to the UN Rights of The Child. Philosopher Immanuel Kant recognises the paradox of bringing people into this world: children can’t decide whether or not they want to be born. There are many things that need to be decided for us, but who we are is not one of them. It is recognisable that inter-country adoption and surrogacy in particular do not meet these conventions. Australia is highly regarded, and rightly so, in its policy development and legislative application because it has found ways to reflect the UN conventions as well as meeting the interests and needs of infertile couples without contravening those important first principles. Some examples of this are: providing access to identifying information to adoptees and their natural parents; protecting the interests of children from 3rd world countries by ensuring that adoptions are only organised on a government to government basis; recognising that traditional adoption is not in the interests of either the child or the original family by providing guardianship and custody as an alternative mechanism for the secure placement of a child in need of a family; by legislating for an open adoption model; by prohibiting commercial surrogacy; and by ensuring that any contract entered into would not be supported by courts in Australia where it was believed pressure had been brought to bear on the carrying mother. An important cultural and psychological shift for the Australian society occurred in 2013 when the Government in every State in Australia, as well as the Federal Government, issued a heartfelt and comprehensive apology in recognition of the damage done to children and their families through the practice of closed adoption. Whilst open adoption has been one legislative remedial approach to the problems of a closed and/or forced adoption, the importance of the apology was that it acknowledged that any form of the removal of a child from its family of origin causes grief and a lifetime experience of loss. ADOPTION Domestic Adoption is an out of date method of placing a child in an alternative setting We know the impact of separating children from their mothers now, which we didn’t know in the 20s and 30s. Research has confirmed a knowledge and understanding of what is called The Primal Wound, which has a life time effect on both child and mother. Secrecy is outdated as it is now understood that a family constructed on the basis of a secret is fundamentally flawed. Illegitimacy is no longer the social stain that it once was and an ex-nuptial birth no longer the barrier to marriage and a good life. The permanency that adoption provided flowed from the secrecy, the changing of the birth certificate and the complete exclusion of the original family. In recognising the damage of secrecy and in accepting a society whose mores have completely changed, adoption in any form is no longer a useful legislative implement to assure permanency. In whose interests? Traditional adoption was presented as having two clients: the infertile couple and the ex-nuptial child. This model – a couple wishing to become a family and a child in need of an alternative family – is no longer a helpful construct. The infertile couple’s interests are of a different nature to the needs of a child who currently does not have a family able to care for it. A couple’s interest in having a non-biological child has been variously described as including altruism, psychological, emotional or social needs. For most it boils down to changing from being a couple to a family. By contrast the UN tells us that a child’s needs are met by being raised in a family that is socially and culturally relevant to its origins and where it continues to enjoy its name and knowledge of its family of origin. The child is voiceless, powerless and in need of protection. Therefore it is imperative that we as adults ensure that any legislation we enact must protect and secure the needs of the child. It is also incumbent on us to interpret those needs independently and separately from the interests of any couple wanting to care for a non-biological child. It has been in the nature of adoption, and continues to be the case, that the power and influence has resided with the adopters and the institutions that have facilitated this process. By their nature they have money, influence, status, control of the delivery of messages through media – and these days the addition of celebrity status in a society that celebrates fame and rewards it in many ways. ADOPTION – Inter-country Inter-country adoption has exploded as a means of supplying families for couples because white Australian babies are no longer available in sufficient numbers. We’re all familiar with the reasons the women placed their children: poverty, social stigma, unmarried status, family shame, lack of extended support, religious precepts. Women in third world countries who relinquish their children do so for the same reasons that we did in the past. Much is now known about the loss, the grief and the lifelong impact of separation. Add to these factors that the child taken from another country loses its culture, its language, its clan and its nationhood and it would appear that we have learned nothing. The consequence of this understanding in the Australian context has meant that inter-country placements are modest in number and are done carefully and with great concern for the need to protect the best interests of that child. Our experience in Australia at the moment is that the celebrity voices, and those committed to seeing a renaissance of adoption, are willing to undermine the legislative framework that is intended to protect the interests of the child rather than promote the interests of the infertile couple. Perhaps the best way to picture this is that the infertile couple’s interest is in the exclusive attachment of themselves to the child in their first world country. However, by contrast, were the prospective adoptive parents to spend a fraction of their money on supporting a child in its country of origin – and in its family or some like-minded community – then that whole community would flourish. This encapsulates nicely the conflict of interests and needs in adoption. Much has been said about the new thinking around open adoption and the presumed merits of this type of placement compared with the traditional model. Whilst it can be said that there is no real intention in inter-country placement that secrecy should prevail, what is self-evident is that our current best practice, ie open adoption, is impossible in the inter-country context. What is also not possible, and yet everyone in adoption is now wedded to it, is the right of the child to at least know the name of their family of origin. Not even this is possible in most cases of an inter-country placement. This raises the question of why we believe it reasonable to apply one set of rules in our first world country and accept a different and lesser set of expectations for a child whose birthplace is a third world country. DONOR CONCEPTION There is an array of complex concerns around donor conception. Our particular concern is egg and embryo donation. Our experience with women who have been faced with the question of what to do with their eggs and embryos, having completed their families, is that the quality of the counselling has not ensured a complete picture of the emotional and psychological ramifications of allowing another couple to bear their child. This kind of donation is another form of relinquishment, only this time of an unborn child. Women who are faced with this choice are not provided with the kind of counselling that would ensure they understand the impact of relinquishment. It may be that this is the case because the medical profession does not conceptualise the transfer of embryos as a relinquishment. It is yet another example of an unwillingness to take the lessons of past policy and apply them rigorously to new technological practices. It may be that some in the medical profession recognise that doing so may not be in the economic interest of their business. We know that best practice would ensure that any child produced through a donation should have access to both knowledge of and contact with the donor/s. We know secrets destroy families so how do we ensure that all children are able to know the true circumstances of their conception and birth? Legislation is essential to protect these truths and yet what we currently have is a willingness by legislators and those involved in the donor and surrogacy sphere to withhold the truth, even to the point of falsifying legal documents. Again, we know from past practice that this is a travesty and that the rights of all those children are being trampled by the interests of adults who do know better but who see themselves as benefitting from this deceit. SURROGACY It has been more than 25 years since ARMS first called the community to recognise that surrogacy would produce the new generation of grieving women. Since then we have seen an explosion of prospective commissioning couples desperate to secure a child, especially as the pool of babies available to be adopted has dramatically reduced. Surrogacy is even more attractive than adoption because it offers the possibility of either one or both of the commissioning couple to be genetically connected to the child. It also enables the commissioning couple to negate any meaningful role that the carrying mother plays by dismissing it as incubation of “their” child. Compounding this commodification is the use of girls and women in third world countries to provide these services: surely clear exploitation of the powerless by the powerful. Policy initiatives must ensure that girls and women in third world countries are not used in this way; that commercial surrogacy is prohibited and that any contract cannot be held valid where it demands the transfer of the child from the carrying mother should that be against her wishes. The lesson from adoption is that a woman cannot truly grasp the lived truth of relinquishing a child until she has given birth to that child and has had time to recover from the birthing process. At minimum, any woman who enters a surrogacy arrangement must be entitled to a revocation period and to renege without legal retribution. She also must be provided with appropriate adequate, relevant counselling for both herself and her family. Legal representation should be provided to her prior to an agreement being entered into and throughout the process of the pregnancy, and be paid for by the State to ensure its partiality to her circumstances and its independence. Our experience has been that our feelings in relation to the child we carried were not as important as those of the couple for whom the child was intended. Surrogacy is designed to meet the needs of the commissioning couple. The surrogate’s emotional landscape will always take second place, if only because of the imbalance of power. In a surrogacy arrangement it is expected that there will be no emotional attachment, but the foetus that is growing is ultimately & irrevocably linked with her body. The surrogate mother WILL bond with the child in utero regardless of whether or not she has contributed genetic material. The relinquishing mother will grieve for the child. This reaction is lifelong, as it is with adoption. No-one knows how they will cope with a situation until they’ve lived it. Early evidence shows that after the first warm glow of altruism wears off, women are missing their babies and grieving. It is a hidden and unacceptable grief. Surrogacy ignores the welfare of the child because it treats the child as a commodity to be ordered and exchanged as an article of transfer. The effects of surrogacy are likely to be even more damaging than adoption for the child because of the planned nature of the decision to deliberately create a child to be relinquished. We also know from surrogacy arrangements that have occurred to date that they can have a serious and deleterious impact on the existing children of the carrying mother who will need to help them understand why she would give away what they see as one of their siblings; and contend with a child’s fear that they too may be given away. CONCLUSION In the creation of public policy it is imperative to illuminate the value judgements, political pressures and social consequences that are involved in any movement towards legislation. It cannot be assumed that science and the creation of families are value free processes. It is essential that the values that underpin whatever progress we make in relation to these matters properly reflect the values of an informed community and not those of a self-invested medical fraternity and an elite of white, middle class, well-off couples in search of the status of family. The fundamental truth of all societies is that no-one has the right to a child.”
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The modern family: Victoria's outdated adoption laws set for a shake-up

The modern family: Victoria's outdated adoption laws set for a shake-up | Adoption | Scoop.it
Law Reform Commission review aims to ensure adoption laws better reflect a "contemporary understanding" of what it is to be a family,
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Ms Mikakos said the Law Reform Commission would have until February 2017 to report back to the government, with the community invited to make submissions over coming months.


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Spinifex Press » Adoption Deception

Spinifex Press » Adoption Deception | Adoption | Scoop.it
What is it like to be adopted, have your identity changed and never feel quite at home in your new family, despite being loved? What is it like to become a social worker and be faced with the challenges and consequences of other adoptions every day? What
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Couple wrongly accused of abuse 'unlikely to see adopted child again' - AOL UK

Couple wrongly accused of abuse 'unlikely to see adopted child again' - AOL UK | Adoption | Scoop.it
A couple wrongly accused of abusing their child who was later adopted are "likely never to see their baby again," according to their lawyer. Karri a Cox and Richard Carter, both aged 25, were found not guilty at Guildford Crown Court of child
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The first-time parents from Guildford, Surrey, who were cleared by the court on Wednesday, said in a statement: "We took our child to the hospital seeking help and they stole our baby from us."

'A crime they never committed'
Despite plans to try and overturn the adoption, their lawyer Michael Turner, of Garden Court Chambers, fears they may not see the child again.
He said: "These innocent parents have been spared a criminal conviction and a prison sentence for a crime they never committed.
"Their life sentence is that they are likely never to see their baby again."

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Adoption: A Permanent Solution To A Temporary Problem | elle cuardaigh

Adoption: A Permanent Solution To A Temporary Problem | elle cuardaigh | Adoption | Scoop.it
This thought came to me last night. I guess I had read one-too-many posts on adoption as a victory, while suicide is a tragedy. It all came together like a head-on collision: When we ask women to "make an adoption plan," what we are really saying is, "Die, and let me have your child." How…
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When a parent asks for help, they are not asking for the removal of their child, they are just asking for help. I would like to think that as a society we are evolving in understanding and empathy. 

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Couple who 'adopted' baby on day after he was born are told to hand him back | Daily Mail Online

Couple who 'adopted' baby on day after he was born are told to hand him back | Daily Mail Online | Adoption | Scoop.it
The married couple, who have not been named, have been told by High Court judges in London to surrender the boy even though they are the only family he has ever known.
Nimueh M Johnson's insight:

The tide is turning- JUSTICE Speaks and Family Preservation is the new social more. Actually Family Preservation has always been the moral choice but alas human nature is not always so.

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Where darkness resides: suicide and being adopted ~ Thomas Graham.

Where darkness resides: suicide and being adopted ~ Thomas Graham. | Adoption | Scoop.it

Please click on the title- you be taken to a pdf info page and then it will automatically load this most comprehensive and informative article.
Thomas Graham is the Editor of the Australian Journal of Adoption.

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Adoptee Suicide Revisited

Adoptee Suicide Revisited | Adoption | Scoop.it
Understanding Why Adoptees Are At A Higher Risk For Suicide Writer, sister Seattle-dweller, and Facebook friend, Maureen McCauley Evans wrote the above piece. I laud her efforts, and like her, I mo...
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Posting this for Suicide Prevention Awareness Week.

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"Look at this guy with a Mercedes": rich sperm donor fears contact from two dozen offspring

"Look at this guy with a Mercedes": rich sperm donor fears contact from two dozen offspring | Adoption | Scoop.it
A wealthy sperm donor who has more than 24 children is pleading with the Victorian government to keep his identity secret because he fears his offspring will want to contact him and establish relationships.
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Foster Carers Needed for Teenage Mums - Eastern Melbourne - MacKillop Family Services

Foster Carers Needed for Teenage Mums - Eastern Melbourne - MacKillop Family Services | Adoption | Scoop.it
We are looking for single people or couples in Melbourne's eastern suburbs to help young mothers build their parenting skills before being able to live independently.
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Support family preservation not stranger adoption.

 

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Forgotten Fathers

Forgotten Fathers | Adoption | Scoop.it
What happened to the fathers who had no say in forced adoption?
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Tonight 8:30pm SBS
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Adoption-Related Trauma and Moral Injury

Adoption-Related Trauma and Moral Injury | Adoption | Scoop.it
When most people think of adoption, they think of the joy of a child in need being welcomed with open arms by those who longed for a child. Like
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Family Secrets: I was a war orphan

Family Secrets: I was a war orphan | Adoption | Scoop.it
"I know it sounds strange, but I recall being about four and looking at my family going, I don't know who you are." 
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Church says sorry over forced adoptions | Adoption Trafficking

Church says sorry over forced adoptions | Adoption Trafficking | Adoption | Scoop.it
The Catholic Church in Australia has issued a national apology over past adoption practices that have been described as a "national disgrace". The apology
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This is not just something from the past, it is a current mindset and policy, and expanding.

#adoptfamilypreservation

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Explain why you snatched baby girl at birth: Judge’s order to social workers behind forced caesarean | Social Action

Explain why you snatched baby girl at birth: Judge’s order to social workers behind forced caesarean | Social Action | Adoption | Scoop.it
Sir James Munby has demanded answers in extraordinary case The child was taken from the 35-year-old Italian in forced caesarean The case shines light on murky secrecy of Court of Protection Seeking answers: The judge who heads the family courts, Sir James Munby, has demanded to know why the girl should not be reunited with…
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Sir James Munby taking on the Trenchcoat Gestapo-about bloody time.  

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Victorian Labor to introduce same-sex adoption laws

Victorian Labor to introduce same-sex adoption laws | Adoption | Scoop.it
Thousands of same-sex couples with children will have the right to be jointly recognised as parents by Victorian law, under new adoption laws to be introduced ...
Nimueh M Johnson's insight:

Let them have it- if heterosexual couples and singles can adopt then I will not tolerate same sex couples being discriminated against.
Our struggle is with ALL of society.
Every person should be placed in the arms of their mother when they are born, and then nurtured thereafter.
Every person should at least know the name of their father, and hopefully share a relationship.
Every birth certificate should be a true and accurate record of birth and genetic history

 

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Haiti - Intercountry Adoption

Haiti - Intercountry Adoption | Adoption | Scoop.it

The Department of State (Department) and the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) wish to advise U.S. prospective adoptive parents, adoptive parents, and adoption service providers (ASPs) of new details provided by the Haitian Central Authority,L’Institut du Bien-Etre Social et de Recherches (IBESR).

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Virgins give birth thanks to IVF treatment

Virgins give birth thanks to IVF treatment | Adoption | Scoop.it
Dozens of young women have had virgin births after undergoing IVF in Britain, it has been reported.
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Put the name of the father on the birth certificate.
Men, if you donate sperm then accept the rights of the child to have full  disclosure of parentage.

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Coming together to study a "dark period" in U.S. adoption - Richmond Times-Dispatch: Bill Lohmann

Coming together to study a "dark period" in U.S. adoption - Richmond Times-Dispatch: Bill Lohmann | Adoption | Scoop.it
Karen Wilson Buterbaugh and Rebecca Ricardo have, in some ways, lived parallel lives, but their experiences have been wildly different, leaving them with unparalleled views of adoption.
Nimueh M Johnson's insight:

'Dark Period'- the darkness has never ended in the land of rainbow glitter farting unicorns and  kool-aid concoctions. 
#familypreservation  #flipthescript

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"The Parallels between International Adoption and Slavery" by Peter F. Dodds

"The Parallels between International Adoption and Slavery" by Peter F. Dodds | Adoption | Scoop.it

"There is no greater sorrow on Earth than the loss of one's native land."

International adoption is a type of adoption in which parents adopt a child who is a national of a different country. Since 1990, close to a quarter million foreign children have been brought to the United States on orphan visas for the purposes of adoption. This is the greatest relocation of children in America since the Orphan Trains of 1855-1929.

 

 

  
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Adoption is ‘lesser of two evils’ - Marilyn Stowe Blog

Adoption is ‘lesser of two evils’ - Marilyn Stowe Blog | Adoption | Scoop.it
A Family Court judge has described the adoption of a two year-old boy as “the lesser of two evils”.
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At least it has been acknowledged that adoption is fraught with trauma and difficulties. This boy has a right to be safe, cared for, and given an opportunity to enjoy life. I don't deny that. However, the best outcome requires significant changes to child protection and custody laws.

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When sperm-donor children come calling

When sperm-donor children come calling | Adoption | Scoop.it
In Victoria, radical proposals mean children conceived with anonymous donor sperm could find out the name of their father. For some, it's a huge breakthrough; for others, a stunning betrayal.
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