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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Find out how strong your vocabulary is and learn new words at Vocabulary.com.

Find out how strong your vocabulary is and learn new words at Vocabulary.com. | AdLit | Scoop.it
Vocabulary.com helps you learn new words, play games that improve your vocabulary, and explore language.

Via Robin Yu
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Robin Yu's curator insight, November 27, 2013 7:36 PM

This does what Freerice.com does but with context and a little better. Freerice is for a good cause though, and has subjects other than just English vocabulary.

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Excellent Visual Showing 7 Reading Tips to Keep in Mind

Excellent Visual Showing 7 Reading Tips to Keep in Mind | AdLit | Scoop.it
January 12, 2014.
There is an ongoing debate whether to allow students to read books that are not on their reading level or not. I have heard several 1st grade teachers vociferate strong arguments...

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Get a Summary of Information About Sites in Google Search Results

Get a Summary of Information About Sites in Google Search Results | AdLit | Scoop.it
Through Dan Russell's excellent Search ReSearch blog I learned that Google has recently added a potentially helpful new aspect to the search results page.

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Research on Vocabulary Instruction and the Common Core

Research on Vocabulary Instruction and the Common Core | AdLit | Scoop.it

By Tanya S. Wright

 

"The Common Core State Standards ratchet up vocabulary demands for K–2 by calling for children to read and be read to from informational texts from the start of school. While academic vocabulary knowledge is critical for comprehension more broadly (Biemiller, 2006; Nagy & Townsend, 2012), the vocabulary found in informational texts may create different challenges for young readers compared to vocabulary found in fiction (Hiebert & Cervetti, 2012).New vocabulary words in informational texts often represent new concepts for young children."


Via Mel Riddile
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 23, 2014 8:56 AM
Research on Vocabulary Instruction and the Common Core
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Common Core & Ed Tech: Infusing Technology into Literature Circles

Common Core & Ed Tech: Infusing Technology into Literature Circles | AdLit | Scoop.it

The ‘jobs’ that drive the literature circle have not changed much over the years, but the means of accomplishing those jobs has.  I sat in on Tiffani Brown’s presentation on Literature Circles at the CUE Conference.  She has infused different web-based applications into the jobs, making them more fun and engaging for the students.  Here are some of her suggestions:


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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:11 PM

Simple ways to update your lit circles.

Dr. Angela C Gordon's curator insight, January 24, 2014 2:35 PM

Infusing technology into Lit Circles!

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42 Idiom Examples And Explanations

42 Idiom Examples And Explanations | AdLit | Scoop.it
42 Idiom Examples And Explanations Oxford Dictionaries offers the definition of an idiom as “a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words (e.g.,rain cats...

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Students Should Be Tested More, Not Less

Students Should Be Tested More, Not Less | AdLit | Scoop.it
When done right, frequent testing helps people remember information longer.
Lynnette Van Dyke's insight:

These study results are not new.The key is aligning the assessment to your learning purpose.

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10 Ways To Get Students Excited About Reading

10 Ways To Get Students Excited About Reading | AdLit | Scoop.it
Here are a few tips and tricks to help you improve reading skills for a variety of students at different levels.
The post 10 Ways To Get Students Excited About Reading appeared first on Edudemic.

Via Rabbi David Etengoff, Gianfranco D'Aversa
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Arianna Bejarano's curator insight, February 13, 2014 4:54 PM

In this article talks about how to improve children reading skills. Now a days children don't really read books because we have all this technology. Kids rather play with an ipad rather then sit down and read a book. In this article it just doesn't give you skills to improve kids reading its gives you 10 ways to get kids to start reading and improve their brain development 

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This I Believe | A public dialogue about belief — one essay at a time

This I Believe | A public dialogue about belief — one essay at a time | AdLit | Scoop.it

This I Believe is an international organization engaging people in writing and sharing essays describing the core values that guide their daily lives. Over 100,000 of these essays, written by people from all walks of life, are archived here on our website, heard on public radio, chronicled through our books, and featured in weekly podcasts. The project is based on the popular 1950s radio series of the same name hosted by Edward R. Murrow

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See more on this from Jim Burke!

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This I Believe in the Classroom | This I Believe

This I Believe in the Classroom | This I Believe | AdLit | Scoop.it

This I Believe in the Classroom

Thousands of teachers around the world—in every U.S. state and more than 50 countries—have embraced This I Believe as a powerful educational tool. Many have told us that our project was the most enriching writing assignment they have given in many years of teaching.

If you have used This I Believe in any educational setting, we would love to hear from you.

Resources for Using This I Believe with Students

To help teachers guide students through exploring their beliefs and composing personal essays about them, we offer the following tools.

 

Educational Curricula

These educational curricula were designed to help educators guide students in the writing of a This I Believe essay appropriate for inclusion in school writing portfolios. The curricula help students understand the concept of belief, explore their own values, and craft them into a well-written essay. The Middle School and High School curricula have recently been updated to include state-specific core standards reports for all 50 states plus the District of Columbia.

Lynnette Van Dyke's insight:

This week's "This I Believe Essay"--The Way of Silence

Listen here: http://thisibelieve.org/essay/144206/

Silence is usually defined as the lack of sound. But for Dianne Aprile, silence is not the lack of something; it is something unto itself—something both powerful and necessary in our lives. 


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Shakespeare

Shakespeare | AdLit | Scoop.it
Sign up to receive The Monday Morning Connection , our weekly newsletter providing lessons, resources, and topics of interest for secondary English teachers.
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Are E-Books Killing Reading For Fun?

Are E-Books Killing Reading For Fun? | AdLit | Scoop.it
Americans are reading differently than they used to.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 25, 2014 9:57 AM

25 January 2014

 

Generally speaking NPR is one of my "GO TO" resources for reliable  information about "anything." So when I saw this headline in my daily search for scoopable online content, I was intrigued. 

 

Though the PEW Research Center report referenced is a pretty serious and deep and somewhat encouraging report  (see: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2014/E-Reading-Update/Overview.aspx) this six-minute audio seemed to cover the surface, but "failed to support the headline." It did not focus upon the implication of the headline that E-Books ARE killing reading for fun.

 

Actually, I'm trying to be a bit snarky here. The audio is worth listening to. It's the headline that bothers me. We all know that we often scan headlines looking for intriguing articles to read. Some do not create enough traction for us to consider reading, others get us to start but not finish reading, and still others get us to the article that is so intriguing that we read with attentive interest to the end.

 

This morning in my scan for articles, my eye was caught by several headlines and I began to wonder about headlines themselves.

 

A few examples, you can Google them all if any of the tiltes intrigue you...

 

BUT BEFORE you start Googling the titles, Try this.

1. Read the entire list of titles FIRST

2. Being mindful of your own initial reaction to the titles, review the titles and decide which you believe

 - will be articles promoting reading and which will be critical of reading.

 - which will support opinions you already hold and which will challenge your existing opinions

- which you will actually consider Googling so you can read them and which don't even create sufficient curiousity to read

- and finally (rhetorically) which will implant some sense that there really is evidence to support your opinions that you won't read but sub-consciously incorporate as proof that your opinion is justified by some authoritative expertise.

 

THEN read as you wish and when finished, which headlines planted biased opinions that might be dangerous if the article is not read at all or not read attentively. (Was the article WHETHER YOU AGREED WITH IT OR NOT reliant upon cherry-picking the evidence it relied upon for its conclusions? Did the article adequately address any counter-evidence WHETHER YOU AGREED WITH IT OR NOT?)

 

Well, as are all of my "commentary assignments" you may consider them only rhetorical. But, here's the list...

 

 

"Most American adults read a print book in the past year, even as e-reading continues to grow"

"Kids Aren't reading On Tablets"

"The Top 10 Books on Apple's iBooks"

 

"Book-crazy boy, 5, a budding literary critic"

 

"A brief guide to faking your way through literary classics when you haven't actually read them"

"Getting Rid of Books, Making Space for Life"

"Reading Books Is Fundamental"

 

"9 Video Games Based On Classic Literature"

 

"BEHIND TWO GOOD MOVIES, TWO GREAT BOOKS"

 

"CODE IS NOT LITERATURE"

 

"Why It's Important to Keep Reading Books By People Even If They're Monsters"

 

"Is American literature 'massively overrated"?

 

"Fla. Board of Ed weighs changes to Common Core"

 

"5 Questions To Evaluate Curriculum For Rigor"

 

"Holding Teachers Accountable For Decisions They Aren't Allowed to Make"

 

"The Peculiar Underworld of Rare-Book Thieves"

 

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

by GLT GLobal ED (dba Google Lit Trips) a 501c3 tax-exempt educational non profit encouraging learners to "READ THE WOR(L)D"

 

 

 

 

 

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Using Graphic Novels in Education: SideScrollers | Comic Book Legal Defense Fund

Using Graphic Novels in Education: SideScrollers | Comic Book Legal Defense Fund | AdLit | Scoop.it
Welcome to Using Graphic Novels in Education, an ongoing feature from CBLDF that is designed to allay confusion around the content of graphic novels and to...
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We're Teaching Books That Don't Stack Up

We're Teaching Books That Don't Stack Up | AdLit | Scoop.it
All too often it's English teachers who close down teen interest in reading.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 24, 2014 3:36 PM

24 January 2014

 (This scooped article was orignally published in 2008)

 

Okay, Gulp!

 

I think I'll begin my comments with one of my favorite Dick Cavett quotes....

 

__________

It's a rare person who wants to hear what he doesn't want to hear.

__________

 

There, I said it. Literature teachers, we may just be a big part of the problem, well intended as we may be.

 

If you don't read the scooped article, or finish my brief comments, I'll include one paragragh from the article worthy of some open-minded collegial contemplation in a pending department meeting...

 

__________

""Butchering." That's what one of my former students, a young man who loves creative writing but rarely gets to do any at school, called English class. He was referring to the endless picking apart of linguistic details that loses teens in a haze of "So what?" The reading quizzes that turn, say, "Hamlet" into a Q&A on facts, symbols and themes. The thesis-driven essay assignments that require students to write about a novel they can't muster any passion for ("The Scarlet Letter" is high on teens' list of most dreaded). I'll never forget what one parent, bemoaning his daughter's aversion to great books after she took AP English Literature, wrote to me: "What I've seen teachers do is take living, breathing works of art and transform them into dessicated lab specimens fit for dissection."

__________

 

(awkward pause)

 

 

 

Yes, we do need to sow the seeds of the next crop of English majors. But, we ought to consider it even more important, since the numbers are so lopsided, to remember that as many as 90% of our students "ain't gonna major in English" and perhaps as many as 50% of our students "ain't gonna read a single piece of fiction" after they are no longer required to do so.

 

I know.

 

I don't particularly want to hear it either.  But "facts is facts." And, if there is any truth in the contentions made in this article that in too many cases we may be killing what we believe we are nourishing we may want to revisit even our own personal favorite lessons.

 

I am not proposing that we "dumb down" but rather that we give some thought to how we might "relevance up" what we do in our literary reading instruction. Anyone who can't imagine how to "relevance up" say a play like Cyrano deBergerac, must surely have forgotten what it felt like to have acne or the intensity of the forces of physical attractivenss at a time in one's life when "inner beauty" is just something that teens' parents say is really important while correcting their children's posture.

 

Yes, of course! That's it. Our students don't particularly want to hear what they don't want to hear either. But, we're the grown ups in the room aren't we? 

 

Of course if taken as a blanket condemnation of how we teach literary reading, then it is a harsh and unfair implication to suggest that none of us do manage to successfully engage the vast majority of our students. But, if we are willing to listen and hear what we may not really want to hear, we may give some readjusted attention to the complaints of those who are brave or annoyed enough to express those complaints. And, if we really do want to hear what we really don't want to hear, then we might also spend significant time listening to the eerie silience of those who "lay low" only pretending to care or to those silent ones who don't even bother to pretend to care while wondering why the clock moves so slowly.

 

We can sometimes too easily explain away the complaints and disengaged silence by believing that "they're just lazy, they spend too much time on facebook, they just don't care, that they just want less challenging work." There certainly are those. But a surprising number of the disengaged don't want less; they want "something" more.

 

It was not too long ago that the battle cry was, "No Child Left Behind!" But, I would propose that perhaps an equally important concern is that when we finish with them, that they do not ride off "into the real world" happy to be finally free to leave some of their teachers behind.

 

Teach to their hearts and their minds will follow.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

Shay Davidson's curator insight, January 24, 2014 8:47 PM

Interesting. I'm quite sure people could argue all day about the books kids are forced to read in high school. I only wish that good teachers had a choice in the books they wanted to present to students--and I'd get to pick the good teachers out!

Steffen Sipe's curator insight, January 30, 2014 3:45 AM

sorry....

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Does Instructional Reading Level Exist? A Response to Timothy Shanahan (Part 3) | Burkins & Yaris

Does Instructional Reading Level Exist? A Response to Timothy Shanahan (Part 3) | Burkins & Yaris | AdLit | Scoop.it
This is our third response to Timothy Shanahan's recent article in AMERICAN EDUCATOR, where he recommends sweeping changes to literacy instruction but cites scant research.
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Learning to Read is Like Learning to Ride a Bike | Burkins & Yaris

Learning to Read is Like Learning to Ride a Bike | Burkins & Yaris | AdLit | Scoop.it
In this post we challenge the common metaphor for the gradual release of responsibility: teaching a child to ride a bike. We suggest that, instead of us scaffolding the reader, we can let texts scaffold.
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“Connecting” to the Transformative Power of Reading | Burkins & Yaris

“Connecting” to the Transformative Power of Reading | Burkins & Yaris | AdLit | Scoop.it

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Frances's curator insight, January 22, 2014 9:20 AM

Role of Oral Language

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Google Lit Trips: Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Google Lit Trips: Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day | AdLit | Scoop.it
“But, how do you know if an ending is truly good for the characters unless you traveled
with them through every page?

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 22, 2014 2:34 PM

22 January 2014

Imagine my surprise when Kristen Pavese, author of this article begins by responding to the quote  above from Shannon Hale's Midnight in Austenland with...

 

__________

"If only the character in Shannon Hale's novel had heard about Google Lit Trips, she would have known that this is in fact, possible!. Google Lit Trips is a free resource that allows readers to virtually follow the journey of literary characters via Google Earth...These pre-created trips place readers inside the story so they can see for themselves the path that characters have followed and experience the sights they have seen. Pop-up windows at each location provide the reader with different resources that stimulate higher level reading skills - discussion starters, links for further information, videos, etc. These resources bring about a fuller understanding of the text while establishing real world connections the reader can learn about for himself."

__________

 

Pavese,  then points to the Google Lit Trip for Elizabeth Partridge's "Marching for Freedom" as an example that might be quite appropriate in light of our remembrance of the life of Martin Luther King jr. 

 

__________

"The site offers a pre-created trip for "Marching for Freedom" by Elizabeth Partridge. Partridge tells the true story of the children who chose to join Dr. King on the march from Selma to Washington during the Civil Rights Movement in 1965. The trip outlines the 5 day march, giving students a visualization of the path the participants took, where they stopped, and what happened on each day. The pop-ups provide videos that make students feel as if they went on the march themselves – including speeches by MLK and LBJ, as well as a video of the actual marching. Among other things, the pop-ups also include links to documents that will give the readers background information (like the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and MLK’s principles of non-violence), discussion questions, and notes from the author."

__________

 

I must say that when Elizabeth Partridge contacted me to suggest that perhaps the book she was about to publish might make a good Lit Trip, I was stunned to say the least. An actual author contacting me?? Wow! The Google Lit Trips project had reached beyond any expectations I'd ever had for the project.

 

And, in collaborating with Elizabeth in the months before the publication of her book, the entire title being, Marching For Freedom: Walk Together Children, and Don't You Grow Weary," I found myself up close and personal with a portion of the Civil Rights story that I had not been deeply aware of although I had been convinced that I had known quite a bit about Civil Rights Movement. 

 

When we stumbled across actual video clips of the march posted on YouTube, I was more than intrigued by the mysterious description of the footage reading...

 

__________

"A powerful and recently rediscovered film made during the 1965 Selma to Montgomery march for voting rights. Stefan Sharff's intimate documentary reflects his youthful work in the montage style under the great Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein. The film features moving spirituals. Marchers include Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife Coretta Scott King."

__________

 

It was nearly impossible for me to believe that in 2009 there was film to be "rediscovered." And then I noticed that the footage had been posted by "YouTube user: BTSharf, the son of the film's director.and one of the film's cameramen. 

 

I contacted  Mr. Sharf: in pursuit of permission to include the footage in the Marching for Freedom Lit Trip. I received this reply...

 

__________

"Re: requesting permission to use videos 09/08/09

You certainly have permission to embed this video. We would appreciate it. This is a document that should be seen, the more traffic the better.

Send me a link.

Billy "

__________

 

As we continued to work on the Marching for Freedom Lit Trip, being able to take the journey of the march and learning more about the "back story" than I had managed to gather even in my own fairly deep following of the actual events in the news, magazines, and television reports at the time of the march, and at the same time learning much more about the Elizabeth Partridge's back story personal journey in researching the "stories behind the story" of the march, it became clearer than ever that creating learning experiences that somehow virtualize the experience of traveling alongside the characters and people in their own life journeys had a way of personalizing the learning  experience that is much more engaging and therefore much more informative than can be acheived when the "story" is reduced to the pages alloted for such historically momentous events in history books, or in newscasts, and magazine articles. 

 

There is a kind of access to the truth of the "character of the characters"  as well as the "character of the people" if we are able to "travel with them" as author Shannon Hale points out in the quote from her book used by Pavese as a starting point for her article.

 

And I realized that whether one is reading fiction, historical fiction or non-fiction, there is a bringing together in the same space of the reader and the events portrayed, that is essentially a virtual travel along. And, this engagement makes it possible to not only "know" the events, but to actually "feel" the events, to empathize with the conditions and motivations and dilemmas of choice faced by the characters and people as if we were there walking right along side them.

 

When Elizabeth and I reached the end of the development of the Marching for Freedom Lit Trip, where we took the reader to "virtually witness" the incredible speech given by Martin Luther King Jr. at the Alabama State Capitol,  only one block beyond Martin Luther King's Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, we found a video clip from that lesser known, speech, but perhaps at least as eloquent, as the "I Have a Dream" speech.

 

Martin Luther King Jr, did not actually name his speeches, but this one is sometimes known as the "How Long? Not Long!" speech. As we brought readers through Elizabeth's retelling of the story while taking them on the long march both in text and in the virtual reality of Google Earth, the video clip is viewed within the context of having "virtually marched alongside" the marchers after multiple failed attempts to begin, having "virtually been there with the marchers" as they were beaten on one attempt to cross the imfamous Pettus Bridge, having marched in peace as helicopters buzzed above and various "law enforecement troops "protected and intimidated" the marchers, having faced the possible dangers ahead as they passed through some of the most notoriously violent and racist areas along the way,  having walked past the actual church where Martin Luther King jr was and had been the pastor for 20 years, in a sense having reached the end of the march "virtually exhausted" yet proud of surviving the intimidation and fears, and challenges of the march as though we had been there, it became clear that we were experiencing that speech from within a very different context than when we only read the speech from within the context of the very few pages devoted to the entire Civil Rights Movement in history books or the few days devoted to the entire Civil Rights Movement  in history classroom lectures and discussions where hundreds of years of history must be taught and learned in the matter of one or two semesters,, or from within the context of our livingrooms watching three-minute annual newscasts including only the briefest of video excerpts of original coverage of the entire Civil Rights Movement on Martin Luther King Day or from within the context of the recognition that preparing for the all important "test  on Chapter ____" in the history text is too often perceived as being the primary value of the brief encounter with importance of information about the Civil Rights Movement.

 

I can't help but also mention that building a Lit Trip is a journey in itself. As Elizabeth and I worked on the "Marching for Freedom" Lit Trip, she shared her behind the scenes stories that she discovered on her research journey that took her to places between and beyond Selma and Montgomery as she interviewed many of the actual participants to discover their individual and shared back stories. In sharing those with me and with her readers, I was not only reminded of my clear recollection of the events as I knew them, but I also learned how little I really knew about a subject I thought I'd paid particularly close attention to at the time. 

 

Ironically, though President Johnson's greatest legacy may have been his signing of the Civil Rights Bill Act of 1964, I had not seen anything beyond the sound bites of his incredible speech at the time. I realized after seeing that entire speech, that my opinion of President Johnson had been based too heavily upon my concerns that he "was no Jack Kennedy, that he was a hardball politician who appeared to be quite at ease employing tactics I perceived as having questionable ethics as well as questionable motives in order to get what he wanted, and that he was unable or perhaps less interested in resolving the Vietnam war conflict that he had inherited from multiple previous presidents;  an earily familiar sounding predicament today.

 

And while working with Elizabeth and discovering President Johnson's speech in its entirety, I came to realize that in my youth I had not allowed these very negative perceptions of President Johnson to be tempered at least a bit by the side he showed in the Civil Rights work he helped bring to fruition.

 

In discovering the entire version of his speech online, I came to realize that as a president from the south where remnants of the influence of pro-segregationist Dixicrat party still held signficant sway in the Democratic party, Johnson's speech represented not just a expression of Democratic support for the Civil Rights Movement, but also an act of extreme political and personal courage.

 

In conclusion, Shannon Hale, speaking no doubt of other matters, nailed a truth about "knowing." We can not know the truth about characters and the universal truths they represent about humanity in the "real world" until we travel with them through their journeys, at least as much as we can in the course of becoming aware of what it is to become not merely human beings but also humane beings. And, in the case of the Civil Rights Movement as well as perhaps all human activity, it is equaly important walk in the shoes of others through both fictionand nonfiction in order to discover what the forces are behind those who become inhumane beings.

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, now an official 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

 

 

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, January 22, 2014 8:07 PM

How great it this. I think being able to follow characters on their journey would be awesome. But I love fantasy, so unless the author provides maps I guess I am still stuck.

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Family Literacy Day 2014 | ABC Life Literacy Canada

(August 12, 2013 — Toronto, ON) — On January 27, 2014, Family Literacy Day will celebrate 16 years of learning as a family. This year, ABC is...

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Fatima Formariz's curator insight, January 21, 2014 11:36 PM

15 Minutes of Fun, lists everyday literacy related activities families can engage in.  All it takes is 15 minutes.  

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How to Cite Information from Internet

How to Cite Information from Internet | AdLit | Scoop.it

"... a simplified guide on how to cite online information using MLA style."  Excellent Classroom Poster ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning |


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Award-Winning Works | Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

Welcome to the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards’ online galleries!

Here you can browse through the National Award-winning art and writing works from the past few years. Click on “CLICK HERE” below to start selecting your search criteria!

Lynnette Van Dyke's insight:

Quoted on this page:

 

"The continuous movement back and forth from specific instance to general significance, from fact to meaning, from the sensory and emotional to the intellectual-such is the art of the essay."
                --Carol Burke and Molly Best Tinsley, The Creative Process
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collection_of_essays.pdf

Collection of Essays:
This packet of excerpts from essays allows students to see how transitions in essays are mostly content-based, not "first", "second", "third" etc. Also note the writers' intros and conclusions.

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Essays

"The continuous movement back and forth from specific instance to general significance, from fact to meaning, from the sensory and emotional to the intellectual-such is the art of the essay."...
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