AdLit
9.8K views | +4 today
Follow
AdLit
Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Thesis: disciplinary writing
Scoop.it!

Teacher Practices that Impact Reading Motivation | Reading Topics A-Z | Reading Rockets

Teacher Practices that Impact Reading Motivation | Reading Topics A-Z | Reading Rockets | AdLit | Scoop.it
Using Concept-Oriented Reading Instruction (CORI) or practices to encourage engagement, educators can advance the breadth and depth of students' reading by explicitly and systematically nourishing students' motivations as readers.

Via Kath Lok
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Web2.0 Tools for Staff and Students
Scoop.it!

ExitTicket Student Response System - Digital post-its and then some..

ExitTicket Student Response System - Digital post-its and then some.. | AdLit | Scoop.it

Was trying to find some sort of digital "exit ticket" where students could respond to the lesson and give you feedback as to how much they have learned.

 

This product appears to do it and much much more (dont they all). There is a Price Plan if you want to go the "whole hog" but you do get some things for free - https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/7336564/WEB2.0/Exit.png

 

Students can complete quizzes or questionnaires for their exit ticket. Students can do this on any connected mobile or desktop device. Some impressive storage and displays of results.

 

Website has lots of good help features and reviews


Via gideonwilliams
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Useful Resources for teachers of English
Scoop.it!

Modal verbs definition with meaning and examples

Modal verbs definition with meaning and examples | AdLit | Scoop.it
Definition of a modal verb and also there meanings with examples. English grammar lesson

Via Learning Basic English vocabulary and grammar, Ana Lara
more...
Learning Basic English vocabulary and grammar's curator insight, January 25, 2014 9:53 PM

Definition of a modal verb and also there meanings with examples. English grammar lesson

Leanne Elizabeth Sinks's curator insight, January 28, 2014 10:22 AM

Verbs, Verbs, and more Verbs 

Mohamed Cherif's curator insight, February 7, 2014 3:59 PM
Things I would love to see my students reading
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, Dysgraphia, ADD, ADHD, LD, GENDER DISORDER, Autism AWARENESS
Scoop.it!

Dyslexia - The Danks Davis Tutoring Method - Home

Dyslexia - The Danks Davis Tutoring Method - Home | AdLit | Scoop.it
Dyslexia tutoring using multisensory method: success for dyslexics using Zannie Danks Davis' Seven Steps for Literacy Success method.

My tutoring programme uses spelling as a tool to enable a child's multisensory learning style assist them to learn. In simple terms, I tune into their learning styles and bring their styles to the forefront. Then they can use their particular learning style to attain competency in reading, writing, and spelling. Individual needs are recognised with my programme.

Literacy is of increasing importance in today's literacy-dominated educational system. Without reading, writing, and spelling skills to at least match their chronological ages dyslexics in most schools have little chance of reaching their potential. As a consequence they are condemned to a life at school of being regarded as low achievers, and seldom given opportunities to demonstrate their cognitive strengths.


Via Collection of First
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Ideias
Scoop.it!

7 Tips For Parents Of Struggling Readers

7 Tips For Parents Of Struggling Readers | AdLit | Scoop.it
7 Tips For Parents Of Struggling Readers Literacy starts and ends at home. Teachers instruct, support, promote, and provide, but if the bulk of the reading and writing isn’t done at home for authentic purposes...

Via Luciana Viter, Maria Margarida Correia
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from common core practitioner
Scoop.it!

Guiding Students Through Expository Text with Text Feature Walks

Guiding Students Through Expository Text with Text Feature Walks | AdLit | Scoop.it

The text feature walk guides students in the reading of text features in order to access prior knowledge, make connections, and set a purpose for reading expository text. Results from a pilot study illustrate the benefits of using the strategy, and practical suggestions for implementation are offered.


Via Deb Gardner, commoncore2014@gmail.com
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from English Listening Lessons
Scoop.it!

"Here Comes The Sun"

"Here Comes The Sun" | AdLit | Scoop.it
English Listening Comprehension exercise on the Beatles song Here Comes The Sun, to practise listening skills, spelling words that students often find confusing, and identifying simple, high frequency vocabulary in context.

Via Sue Lyon-Jones
more...
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Full Day Institute on Using Student Writing Samples Aligned with the Common Core

Full Day Institute on Using Student Writing Samples Aligned with the Common Core | AdLit | Scoop.it
Your source for news from the world of literacy
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Educational Leadership:Tackling Informational Text:Preparing English Language Learners for Complex Reading

Educational Leadership:Tackling Informational Text:Preparing English Language Learners for Complex Reading | AdLit | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from college and career ready
Scoop.it!

College Readiness: Writing to Learn

College Readiness: Writing to Learn | AdLit | Scoop.it

Ben Johnson

College Readiness: Writing to LearnMARCH 8, 2012

The controversial author Norman Mailer said, "I don't know what I think until I write it down." Joan Didion perhaps said it better in this way, "I write entirely to find out what I'm thinking, what I'm looking at, what I see and what it means. What I want and what I fear." Donald Murray, a pioneer of the writing process, stated, "...all writers 'are compelled to write to see what their words tell them."

There is an amazing power to learn when you read what you have written. When we write to learn, we analyze, we revise, we organize, we rewrite, we evaluate and so on until what is written is what we want to communicate. These are all higher order thinking skills that we aspire to achieve in the classroom setting. The way it works for me is that I start with an idea and write it down. Then, if I get stuck, I play with it (sometimes like a cat with a dead mouse); I add to it, take away from it and shift it until it makes sense to me. Sometimes I have to let it sit for a while. One of my students said she lets it "marinate." Thinking is hard work. Writing to learn is hard thinking.

Learning From What You Write

Perhaps the first level of writing to learn has already been discussed in my post on critical reading. This happens when students read the stellar works of authors and try to understand not only what was written, but also the implications from what messages are being portrayed by the words choices, style, tone and organization of the text. What better way to clarify understanding than to use writing to enhance learning! Michael Schmoker affirms that a great way to write to learn is reading with "pen in hand," ready to jot down notes in the margins (or on a note pad if you have an aversion to writing in books) in order to capture the things we want to remember: corollary thoughts, disagreements, questions, things to look up for more research, evidence, words we do not understand, references, or more. As I've mentioned before, a way to use writing to enhance learning and thinking is Cornell Notes. Overall, however, it is not specifically the writing that helps the learning.

Though writing is an active learning endeavor, not passive as in listening, the act of writing involves more of the entire body in the process and thus will increase the likelihood of learning. What makes writing to learn powerful is the process of reading, thinking, writing, rereading, and rewriting that occurs over time.

Writing to learn is more than just putting words on the page for someone else to read. The focus has to be on what the writer gets out of the process of writing -- not just the reader. The process of writing to learn clarifies perspectives and crystallizes jewels of personal beliefs. The final product of the writing to learn process is a summation of the thinking and learning that occurred. Writing to learn crosses all content areas. For example, writing about the process of an experiment; what the student hoped to learn, the analysis and what was learned from the conclusion, is all writing to learn. Writing about the experience of solving a difficult mathematical problem, or making connections to disparate historical events can also be writing to learn.

In the Classroom

Students begin to write to learn by laboriously reading what others have written and then mimicking their style and methods in their own writing. As the students get more sophisticated in their writing and learning, then they will be able to reflect on their learning -- what was learned, and what was not learned; how it was learned and perhaps why.

For very advanced learners, the ultimate writing to learn will be the arrival at reflexiveness. This is when a student challenges his or her own writing and learning by asking the hard questions: Why do I believe this? What evidence do I have? Does this demonstrate a bias? What fallacies in thinking am I succumbing to? According to sociologist and author Carol Kingdon, reflexivity is acknowledging the writer's own standpoint or theoretical perspective.

What's the difference between reflexivity and reflectivity? Reflectivity only requires the writer to review what has happened, and perhaps analyze it to arrive at some understanding, point of view or course of action. Reflexivity requires the writer to reflect and then determine what effect he himself has on the thinking and writing. This includes evaluating his own personal character, and beliefs and then involves assessing the effects of who the writer is.

For example, students reading the book, To Kill a Mockingbird, are exposed to prejudice in a number of different forms. Reflective writing would be to put themselves in the shoes of Scout or Atticus, or Boo and discover what their own responses would be. Reflexive writing would take that one step more. It would require the students to identify their sympathies, biases and their own prejudices and identify how these affect their personal analysis of the book.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

600 Other Ways To Say Common Things: Improving Student Vocabulary -

600 Other Ways To Say Common Things: Improving Student Vocabulary - | AdLit | Scoop.it
Helps students reduce cliche language with these 600 "other ways to say." (600 Other Ways To Say Common Things: Improving Student Vocabulary http://t.co/T629h2TvKR #literacy #engchat)...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from CCSS News Curated by Core2Class
Scoop.it!

Powerful Pairings: Read-Alouds for the Common Core

Powerful Pairings: Read-Alouds for the Common Core | AdLit | Scoop.it
Find a sampler of powerful pairs of books for read-alouds in elementary classrooms implementing the Common Core State Standards.

Via Deb Gardner
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, Dysgraphia, ADD, ADHD, LD, GENDER DISORDER, Autism AWARENESS
Scoop.it!

Dyslexic children advancing so fast

Dyslexic children advancing so fast | AdLit | Scoop.it
The discovery of a breakthrough new method in teaching dyslexics is already producing miraculous results for a handful of Queenstown kids.

Via Collection of First
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from IELTS Writing Task 2 Practice
Scoop.it!

Teaching essay writing

Teaching essay writing | AdLit | Scoop.it
Today I presented a seminar with ideas about teaching essay writing, with a particular focus on FCE and IELTS exam tasks. It's part of the monthly seminar series at International House Sevastopol. ...

Via David M
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

Teachers Use Tech: Create a Vocabulary Spinner with the Decide Now! app

Teachers Use Tech: Create a Vocabulary Spinner with the Decide Now! app | AdLit | Scoop.it

"The app, Decide Now! has been a terrific addition to my Vocabulary instruction.  Any time I introduce a new word to our Academic Vocabulary list, students immediately add it to their "Vocabulary wheel" within this app!"


Via John Evans
more...
Hilary Munchel Thompson's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:23 PM

I imagine this would be cool if your school had 1:1 iPad adoption.

Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

rrq67.pdf?v=1&t=hqvi7m1h&s=baf1efc9beeee2d0dbc9b0d616250f597cb6ea80

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Literacy Research Panel - International Reading Association

Literacy Research Panel - International Reading Association | AdLit | Scoop.it
Literacy Research Panel

 


Panel members John Guthrie, Peter Freebody, Peter Johnston, Annemarie Palincsar, Elizabeth Moje, and Amy Correa at the 2012 IRA Annual Convention

Under the leadership of Dr. P. David Pearson Ph.D., of the University of California at Berkeley IRA created the Literacy Research Panel to respond to critical literacy issues facing policymakers, school administrators, teacher educators, classroom teachers, parents and the general public.

After much consultation and careful consideration with IRA staff and Board President Victoria Risko, Dr. Pearson extended invitations to 13 researchers, focusing on the substantive depth and diversity the panel would need to establish strong credibility as a research source. In a second phase, he invited three additional members to the group, two researchers from the international community, and a practicing classroom teacher. Rounding out the Panel as ex officio members are IRA Director of Research, Virginia Goatley (2011-12), and IRA President, Victoria Risko (2011-12), Carrice Cummins (2012-13). A complete list of panel members if available here. Announced to the IRA membership in a cover story article in the December/January issue ofReading Today, the IRA membership magazine, the panel quickly began important discussions.

In a series of conference calls and meetings, four issues quickly came to the forefront of discussion:

The Achievement Gap. The racial gap has been narrowed (a little), but the SES gap has actually increased. Moreover, the gap between the 90th percentile and the 10th percentile is continually widening.

Motivation and Engagement. Though the high school dropout rate has been incrementally decreasing in recent years, an alarming 28 percent of students still do not graduate on time. Many students simply aren't being motivated or engaged in a way that will lead to increased retention at either the high school or college levels.

Standards and Assessments. The new Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts present many challenges, including classroom implementation and professional development. Text difficulty is a concern, especially for beginning readers. Moreover the associated assessment issues are likely to be complex.

Teacher Education. The ability to assess student literacy progress toward curricular goals and to lead effective classroom conversations are vital skills in need of systematic development. We need better methods of teacher evaluation and a way to counter the implicit assumption in policy circles that there's no payoff for teacher education or professional development.

The panel divided into four working subgroups to focus on various initiatives suggested in their ongoing discussions:

Group 1 - Vision Statement. This subgroup led discussions of various drafts of a statement that describes current literacy challenges and a vision for improving literacy education. A copy of the current draft of the vision statement is available here. The panel is seeking comments on this document from IRA members and related stakeholders. If you wish to provide comments, questions, or suggestions, please send an email message to research@reading.org with "vision statement" in the subject line.

Group 2 - Panel Presentation at IRA Chicago. This subgroup is planning presentations and media opportunities for the panel. The recent focus involved planning the presentation of the Literacy Research Panel during this year's IRA Convention. The session offered a moderated discussion of critical issues surrounding literacy education and offer research-based frameworks for addressing the policy questions.

Group 3 - Professional Resources and PD Syllabus. This subgroup is working to construct a model of advanced reading and literacy engagement that characterizes learners, relates to classrooms, and is research based. The group is interested in designing and implementing resources and a set of professional materials for classroom instruction that intentionally fosters advanced reading and engagement.

Group 4 – Research Policy. In collaboration with the Board of Directors, this subgroup is working on the development of a more formalized "policy response capability" for IRA, enabling the Association to prepare and disseminate research framed comments and responses to research and policy issues in real time, enhancing IRA's stature as a go-to source for professional guidance on policy matters.

These initiatives are works in progress. Some will require approval from and collaboration with the IRA Board of Directors, especially where resources must be committed to commission certain types of work. The Panel will work very closely with the Board on such matters.

"I'm thrilled that the International Reading Association has taken this bold step to reassert IRA's role in informing policy and practice at all levels — international, national, state and local," said Dr. Pearson. "We need to make sure that our most trusted research is used to improve professional development and classroom practice on the way to more equitable achievement for every group of students — anywhere and everywhere."

"Each year, students struggle to excel because they lack the necessary literacy skills," said International Reading Association President and ex officio Literacy Research Panel Member Victoria Risko. "In the United States, an estimated 32 million adults are unable to read, and about 40 percent of high school graduates lack the literacy skills sought by employers. We're proud to call attention to this issue and work with teachers to improve the quality of literacy instruction across the globe."

The panel intends to engage with policy circles at the national and state level. However, the panel aims to do more than affect policy change; it aims to enhance effective literacy instruction across the country and around the world by introducing constructive initiatives to change policy and practices where it matters — in districts and schools.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Argument Writing
Scoop.it!

NCTE 2011

NCTE 2011 | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Stevi Quate
more...
Stevi Quate's curator insight, November 28, 2013 9:47 AM

Handouts from the 2012 NCTE conference on writing arguments about challenging text

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

Daily Writing Tips

Daily articles on grammar, spelling, misused words, punctuation, fiction writing, freelance writing and more!

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.