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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Reading, Writing, Word study, and Content Literacy
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Poor Kids Are Starving for Words

Poor Kids Are Starving for Words | AdLit | Scoop.it
According to a new initiative, launched at the White House on Thursday, the "word gap" that afflicts low-income children needs to be addressed with the same passion as child hunger.

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Patrice Bucci's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:57 PM

Close the word flap...#vocab #dylanwillam #freddyheibert

Javier Magallanes's curator insight, September 15, 2015 4:47 AM

"Poor Kids Are Starving for Words" talks about how young lower class children are far behind their upper class peers in reading by the time their five years old. Its sad to hear but by the time lower class kids are 5 they would have heard 30 million fewer words then upper class children. This article also explains how lower class parents are part of the reason why  their kids fall behind because they don't realize how much they can affect their kids cognitive development. Also, wealthier families tend to have better access to information then poorer families.This article is credible because the author is a teacher and also writes for the New York Time which is also a credible source. So since she is a scholar she is a credible source.  

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How Digital Games Help Teachers Make Connections to Lessons and Students

How Digital Games Help Teachers Make Connections to Lessons and Students | AdLit | Scoop.it
Teachers finding the most success are good at creatively connecting the game back to the curriculum, while allowing it to maintain the qualities of a good game.
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Open a World of Possible - Discover the joy of reading.

Open a World of Possible - Discover the joy of reading. | AdLit | Scoop.it
Scholastic helps children open a world of possible by helping children learn to read and love to read. Through independent reading, balanced literacy, and guided reading Scholastic drives the discovery, curiosity, and the sheer joy that reading can bring.

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It’s Never Too Late by Julia Reynolds

It’s Never Too Late by Julia Reynolds | AdLit | Scoop.it

I have always been a reader. As I was growing up, my parents had their own books on bookshelves, by their bed, on counters, in cars, and anywhere else they might stop and read. It was similar in the bedroom I shared with my sister – books in baskets, in bookcases, and by my bed – with a light clipped to my headboard so I could read late into the night after the lights were turned off. This foundation for my reading life (which I have repeated with my 9-year-old son Liam) helped me survive the confines of traditional teaching (assigned texts, 6+ week long units, lower-level quizzes and tests) that I encountered during much of my schooling.

 

As an educator, I am a tireless advocate for students and reading, especially what we can do during school hours since we cannot control what happens (or not) at home. This meant, over 17 years ago when I started teaching, giving time every Friday for “Reading Day” with my high school students (despite a curriculum packed with mandated whole class texts). As a district administrator, it means standing against purchasing basals and whole class novels, instead giving money to teachers to choose and purchase books for their classroom libraries. It means learning with Richard Allington, Donalyn Miller, Penny Kittle, Lucy Calkins, Chris Lehman, Cris Tovani, and others to support the professional learning of teachers about reading workshop. It even means taking risks and jumping into teaching situations to remind myself that workshop teaching is challenging work, but it is also the best and most rewarding work I have ever done.

 

A few years ago, I taught a Saturday morning reading class at the local community college. This non-credit bearing course was for students who did not score high enough on the ACT (or took the ACT so long ago that the scores did not count anymore). I was excited to try workshop teaching in my class, so when I was given the course textbook and told to teach skill-and-drill exercises with worksheets, I told my students to not buy the textbook (or sell it back if they already purchased it). Instead, I had a classroom library “on wheels” that I rolled into class every week, laying out books, doing book talks, and helping students pick books.  One student, Anthony, claimed he is a better bedtime story reader for his children because of all the reading he did in class.  Another student, Dennis, who recently was in prison, mentioned that he had never read a book in his life, and now that he finished nine books, including Jack Gantos and Matt De La Peña, in 15 weeks during our class, he had his “swagger” back.

 

A few summers ago, I taught summer school to incoming ninth grade students at a local private school.  The students were chosen due to low entrance exam scores.  The initial idea was for someone to pre-teach the mandated summer reading (The Lightning Thief) over 8 weeks.  Instead, I proposed that I teach the class in a workshop format, with book talks, a classroom library, and time to read. Luckily, the administrators agreed (I don’t think I would have taught it otherwise). One student, Cole, told me that he had not read a book since fifth grade (Hatchet), but during the summer, he discovered books by Chris Crutcher and wanted to read everything written by the author.  In less than 2 months, the 14 students who I “coached” read 229 books (compared to 120 books during their entire eighth grade school year) and 44,716 pages. Every one of the parents thanked me, many with tears in their eyes, for inspiring their child to enjoy reading.

 

Last year, I taught ninth grade English every morning during first hour.  Of course, I did this in a workshop format (daily commitment to reading and writing) with a classroom library of over 1000 books. My students were chosen for my class due to low test scores. We worked all year on setting goals for reading, building stamina, choosing good books, making plans for reading, and celebrating success in reading. Every day, I saw students smiling while they read, engaged in the text, and not willing to put the book down. Arriving early was a daily occurrence as students went book “shopping” at the classroom library, shared book recommendations, and started reading 15-20 minutes before class started. One student who started the year not speaking because of trauma read over 25 books during the year and went on a whirlwind evening trip with me to go meet Laurie Halse Anderson (one of her favorite authors) at a bookstore two hours away.  When I tabulated the end of the year results, we had 667 conferences about reading and writing and my 22 students read 453 books.  Now as tenth graders, my students (who are no longer considered the ones with low test scores) continue to reach out to me to share book ideas, ask for new titles, and demonstrate to me that the experience of “English 9 on Steroids” was successful.

 

These experiences working with students in various contexts to build their reading lives have reinforced my relentless commitment to students and reading.  It is never too late to begin working on the foundation for a love of reading, learning new authors and building stamina. It is never too late to try workshop teaching, and all students should experience the possibility of becoming independent, lifelong readers.  It is never too late to continue advocating for every student’s right to best practice teaching, having access to books, and choosing what she or he reads. We must never stop trying.

 

Julia Reynolds (@jmrliteracy) is Director of Curriculum and School Improvement in Northview Public Schools and Associate Professor of Education (Literacy Studies) at Aquinas College, both in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She is a past president of both the Michigan Council of Teachers of English (MCTE) and Michigan Reading Association (MRA). In her “spare” time, she loves being with her husband, Billy, and their son, Liam, and reading professional, young adult, and children’s literature whenever she can.

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iEduc
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Every Page of Moby-Dick, Illustrated

Every Page of Moby-Dick, Illustrated | AdLit | Scoop.it
Illustrated insights on love, hate, God, capitalism, and the rest of life via Herman Melville and found paper.

Since 2009, former high sc

Via NikolaosKourakos
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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Teaching Vocabulary Leads To Thought

Teaching Vocabulary Leads To Thought | AdLit | Scoop.it
Teaching Vocabulary Leads To Thought

Via Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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3 FREE Poetry Apps from the International Reading Association

3 FREE Poetry Apps from the International Reading Association | AdLit | Scoop.it
Planning a poetry unit? The International Reading Association has some apps that may help. Here are three. They are FREE. :) Acrostic Poem helps kids learn about and write acrostic poetry. An acros...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Stephanie Sapp's curator insight, November 10, 2014 11:48 AM

Looking for a free App?

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from CCSS News Curated by Core2Class
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A Literacy-Rich Classroom Environment Supports the Common Core: Infographic | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies

A Literacy-Rich Classroom Environment Supports the Common Core: Infographic | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies | AdLit | Scoop.it

Much attention is being spent preparing for the Common Core standards and the call for increasing the amount of nonfiction and informational text in classrooms. Perhaps we should begin by focusing attention on the classroom environment and making certain that it is a place that supports and encourages literacy learning.


A literacy-rich environment not only supports the standards set by the Common Core, but also provides a setting that encourages and supports speaking, listening, reading, and writing in a variety of authentic ways – through print & digital media.


Via Deb Gardner
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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CCSS-ELA: Key Shifts in Assessment and Instruction | TextProject

CCSS-ELA: Key Shifts in Assessment and Instruction | TextProject | AdLit | Scoop.it

This presentation will illustrate the shifts in assessment and instruction related to the CCSS in English Language Arts identified by the developers of both the CCSS-ELA and the forthcoming assessments.  These shifts include:  1) Regular practice with complex text and its academic language; 2) Reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from literary and informational text; and 3) Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction.


Via Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from common core practitioner
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wwwatanabe: Close Read Complex Text, and Annotate with Diigo--Part 3

wwwatanabe: Close Read Complex Text, and Annotate with Diigo--Part 3 | AdLit | Scoop.it

The focal points of this post are the teacher steps in close reading; how to create text dependent questions for informational text in 6th-12th grades; annotating in Diigo; and creating writing activities to go with close reading.


Via commoncore2014@gmail.com
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Jessica Cox's curator insight, November 8, 2015 10:34 AM

Professional Article: Close reading

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from common core practitioner
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A Closer Look At the CCSS for Speaking and Listening

A Closer Look At the CCSS for Speaking and Listening | AdLit | Scoop.it

"There has been a lot of discussion around the CCSS ELA expectation for text complexity, balance of informational and literary text, writing with evidence and vocabulary in context. Not as much attention has been paid to the Speaking and Listening standards."


Via Mel Riddile, commoncore2014@gmail.com
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Literacy Across Content Areas
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10 Dos & Don'ts For Teaching Vocabulary In Any Content Area

10 Dos & Don'ts For Teaching Vocabulary In Any Content Area | AdLit | Scoop.it
10 Dos & Don'ts For Teaching Vocabulary In Any Content Area

Via Kelley Webb
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Kelley Webb's curator insight, July 3, 2013 7:37 AM

Academic Vocabulary

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Cool School Ideas
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Four Ways to Foster Independent Readers and Writers

Four Ways to Foster Independent Readers and Writers | AdLit | Scoop.it

By Nicole Zuerblis As an elementary reading specialist, my passion and my goal is always to give students the confidence to see themselves as readers and writers. It seems to be a universal goal that teachers want students to become more independent.


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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Cool School Ideas
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Calling all Shakespeare fans: new service lets viewers watch Globe Theatre productions online

Calling all Shakespeare fans: new service lets viewers watch Globe Theatre productions online | AdLit | Scoop.it

The Globe Player lets viewers rent or purchase videos of various Globe productions, including those in languages other than English.


Via Cindy Riley Klages
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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, November 10, 2014 12:56 PM
Not free, but VERY affordable. What a great opportunity!
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Teaching the Talk, Not the Text

Teaching the Talk, Not the Text | AdLit | Scoop.it
Access to this resource has been provided by the National Council of Teachers of English, an NCLE Stakeholder Organization.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from TeachingEnglish
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Infographic: Reporting what someone wrote | EAP Infographics

Infographic: Reporting what someone wrote | EAP Infographics | AdLit | Scoop.it
Today's infographic shows you a quick overview of the conventions of reporting what someone else said and how we typically do this in academic English.

Via TeachingEnglish
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from PBL
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4 Steps to Empower Student Voice | The Remind Blog

4 Steps to Empower Student Voice | The Remind Blog | AdLit | Scoop.it

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Amy Burns's curator insight, November 9, 2014 3:05 PM

From Remind (formerly Remind 101)-Short examples of the 4 steps with some resources.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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3 FREE Poetry Apps from the International Reading Association

3 FREE Poetry Apps from the International Reading Association | AdLit | Scoop.it
Planning a poetry unit? The International Reading Association has some apps that may help. Here are three. They are FREE. :) Acrostic Poem helps kids learn about and write acrostic poetry. An acros...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Stephanie Sapp's curator insight, November 10, 2014 11:48 AM

Looking for a free App?

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Common Core Online
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How to Teach Informational Writing

How to Teach Informational Writing | AdLit | Scoop.it
The following blog post is part of a blog series called "Comments on the Common Core," written by Eye On Education's Senior Editor, Lauren Davi... (RT @eyeoneducation: Don't Forget to Teach Informational Writing!

Via Darren Burris
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Common Core Online
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Finding Joy in The Common Core Standards: Informative and Explanatory Writing

Finding Joy in The Common Core Standards: Informative and Explanatory Writing | AdLit | Scoop.it
The Common Core Standards for informational writing in grades K – 2 are very broad. For example, the first grade standard states that students “write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts ...

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from CCSS News Curated by Core2Class
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Language Magazine » Cutting to the Common Core: Analyzing Informational Text

Language Magazine » Cutting to the Common Core: Analyzing Informational Text | AdLit | Scoop.it

Given the decisive shift toward informational text reading and evidence-based response, school districts from California to New York are working earnestly to integrate more complex informational text assignments into English language arts curricula and other core subject areas. Similarly, disciplinary and grade-level teams are collaborating on writing text-dependent questions that will ensure students do more than a cursory reading. Close analytic reading of an informational text involves returning to the text to conscientiously identify significant arguments and evidence before scrutinizing the author’s support and language use.

 

Assessments requiring objective, text-dependent responses are additionally prompting teachers to refrain from instructional practices that actually discourage students from delving into complex nonfiction selections, such as assigning personal response journals or providing detailed Cornell notes for students to copy and study.

 

While these curricular involvements are well warranted, less-proficient readers and English learners will need far more than an increase in text and task complexity to engage in competent text investigation and response.


Via Deb Gardner
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from CCSS News Curated by Core2Class
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TeachersFirst: Moving Forward with Informational Text

TeachersFirst: Moving Forward with Informational Text | AdLit | Scoop.it

To promote their understanding of increasingly more complex texts we need to help students adopt a metacognitive stance, step back, look at a given text as a whole,  and analyze its individual parts to discover how they are related and how they contribute to the whole. 


That is the intent of the Common Core's College and Career Readiness Anchor Standard #5 for Reading, which deals with text structure.   Similarly, the Common Core requires students to write informative/explanatory pieces, so to continue moving forward with the reading and writing of informational text, this month we will take a closer look at how you can explicitly teach organizational patterns in reading and have students apply these patterns in their writing.


Via Deb Gardner
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Deb Gardner's curator insight, January 7, 2013 12:10 PM

Reference the bottom of the webpage where a mini-lesson on teaching text structures is provided.

  • Introduction
  • Informational Text Structures
  • Teaching Guidelines
  • The Five Common Structures
  • Applying Structures
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Recommended reading: 20 texts to teach right now - Curriculet

Recommended reading: 20 texts to teach right now - Curriculet | AdLit | Scoop.it

20 recommended reading texts from Curriculet perfect for ELA & other subjects. Curriculet is free for teachers and students - sign up today!


Via Cindy Riley Klages
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