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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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CCSS-ELA: Key Shifts in Assessment and Instruction | TextProject

CCSS-ELA: Key Shifts in Assessment and Instruction | TextProject | AdLit | Scoop.it

This presentation will illustrate the shifts in assessment and instruction related to the CCSS in English Language Arts identified by the developers of both the CCSS-ELA and the forthcoming assessments.  These shifts include:  1) Regular practice with complex text and its academic language; 2) Reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from literary and informational text; and 3) Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction.


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wwwatanabe: Close Read Complex Text, and Annotate with Diigo--Part 3

wwwatanabe: Close Read Complex Text, and Annotate with Diigo--Part 3 | AdLit | Scoop.it

The focal points of this post are the teacher steps in close reading; how to create text dependent questions for informational text in 6th-12th grades; annotating in Diigo; and creating writing activities to go with close reading.


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Jessica Cox's curator insight, November 8, 2015 10:34 AM

Professional Article: Close reading

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A Closer Look At the CCSS for Speaking and Listening

A Closer Look At the CCSS for Speaking and Listening | AdLit | Scoop.it

"There has been a lot of discussion around the CCSS ELA expectation for text complexity, balance of informational and literary text, writing with evidence and vocabulary in context. Not as much attention has been paid to the Speaking and Listening standards."


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Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension | AdLit | Scoop.it

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Gary Woolley's curator insight, February 24, 2013 4:49 AM

Some insights for assisting reading. For mor information go to reading4meaning.blogspot.com

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What implications does the research about early reading intervention have for understanding late-emerging reading disabilities, students who are learning English, and teacher preparation? | Nationa...


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Patrice Bucci's curator insight, March 17, 2013 6:17 PM

Great video by Rolanda O'Connor on the importance of understanding  "late emerging reading diffiiculties".... think constrained skills vs unconstrained skills...

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Teaching Reading and Writing with Technology: Paperless Mission #6: Setting Up GoodReader (iPad)

Teaching Reading and Writing with Technology: Paperless Mission #6: Setting Up GoodReader (iPad) | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Roberto Eduardo Echeverría Castillo, Ruth Chamindi Mathew
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Peggy Milam Creighton's curator insight, November 1, 2013 9:35 AM

some students might be more inclined to write using an app like this one

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Subtext - First Impressions of Collaborative Reading on the iPad

Subtext - First Impressions of Collaborative Reading on the iPad | AdLit | Scoop.it

I recently discovered Subtext, a free app for the iPad, that allows you collaboratively to annotate texts. I have been very impressed with it in the few days I've been playing with it and look forward to testing it out in the classroom.


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Tools for Analyzing Primary Sources and Close Reading-resource list from EDSITEment

EDSITEment contains a variety of links to other websites and references to resources available through government, nonprofit, and commercial entities.

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We are all Reading Teachers, Now

We are all Reading Teachers, Now | AdLit | Scoop.it

Often, there is a reaction of “what about the fiction” from the English teachers because reading is considered an English classroom task.  So, doesn’t this mean that English class will now be full of informational text?  But, what is often missed is the paragraph and footnote of the ELA CCSS page 5 that states: “The percentages on the table reflect the sum of student reading, not just reading in ELA settings.”  In a 66 page document, who can blame us for gravitating towards the charts to make sense of it all?  Let’s face it; we, as a society, love a good visual…consider the Infographic’s meteoric rise to fame.


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How I Fell in Love with Close Reading | MiddleWeb

How I Fell in Love with Close Reading | MiddleWeb | AdLit | Scoop.it
Falling in Love with Close Reading has cured the close reading fatigue of reading coach Katie Gordon by revealing the invisible processes we use as readers.

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How the Great Depression Spawned Literary Masterworks

How the Great Depression Spawned Literary Masterworks | AdLit | Scoop.it
The Great Depression was one of the most desperate periods in U.S. history, and one of the most important in American literature.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 12, 2013 12:16 PM

At the heart of this article is a line that really got me thinking about the difficulties faced by literary reading educators.

 

In focusing upon the kinds of literary writing that sprang from the difficulties of the Great Depression of the 1930s, author Adam Kirsch tosses in...

 

__________

 

"Never before or since have so many of America’s best writers focused on the lives of the poor and the working class or written with such a furious sense of political engagement."

__________

 

Suggesting that today's great writers have not risen to the challenge of circumstances quite similar to the challenge faced head on by the great writers of the 1930s, Kirsch asks what on the surface appears to be a quite simple and quite critical question...

 

__________

 

"What did the storytellers of the Depression know that our own writers don’t?"

__________

 

I can't help but wonder whether the circumstances today are sufficiently different; that today's writers know something about the publishing industry that was not part of the mix in the 1930s.

 

Or whether writers today are so heavily "managed and handled" by a publishing industry that is fighting its own battles to stay alive, that even in times when competition for mass attention for one's work all but require non-resistant compliance to playing it safe strategies.

 

Or perhaps it's the shrinking reading public who read for escape rather than for insight. 

 

Or whether we've evolved / devolved to the point where it's just easier to let those with moderate to outlandish opinions do the thinking for us.

 

Or whether the din of those who would do anything to oppose anyone with opinions contrary to their own; informed or otherwise, is now the white noise of our existence.

 

Or whether we have become so divided and paralyed by that division that we can not allow any idea to exist without causing a massive tsunami of opposition in our partisan media. 

 

Whatever the reasons might be, if  Kirsch's premise has merit, the parallels of circumstances do exist. And, I can't help but wonder if today's public discourse about those parallel circumstances is a more effective or less effective way for a society to face its most difficult challenges.

 

 

btw...

In thinking about this situation, my mind meandered back to Abrahan Lincoln's "A Nation Divided speech," wherein he said speaking of the issue of slavery, though the economic realities behind the controversy have much in common with the economic realities of depressions,...

 

__________

"A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure, permanently, half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved — I do not expect the house to fall — but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other. Either the opponents of slavery will arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction; or its advocates will push it forward, till it shall become lawful in all the States, old as well as new — North as well as South.[1]"

___________

 

History did prove Lincoln correct, at least on the level that opponents did "arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction:..." 

 

But, headlines today even call into question the degree to which the success of ending slavery was in fact sufficiently successful in correcting the problems caused by slavery. 

 

Where Lincoln may have been wrong was that he only predicted an either this or that outcome; whereby either slavery would end or it would become lawful throughout the states.

 

He does not offer the possibility of opposing forces winding up in a never ending absolutely equal tug-of-war where problems are never addressed and status-quo persists until both sides come to their senses or the citizenry demands that they do so.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 "Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

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13 Poetry Collections For People Who Think They Don't Like Poetry

13 Poetry Collections For People Who Think They Don't Like Poetry | AdLit | Scoop.it
When I was first asked to make a list of poetry collections for people who think they don't like poetry, my first thought was, "Well, isn't that just about everyone?" Not quite--I do have nearly 2,000 friends on Facebook, of whom the majori...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 2, 2014 2:47 PM

2 April 2014

It's no secret that poetry's audience is,... well,...you know, um, let's just say small. There were few teachers in my own education who managed to crack my own resistant wall to poetry; at least the poetry that they felt had to be read in the obstacle course of crossing the diploma line.

 

I'm not saying that I welcomed the opportunity to become enlightened by the, whatever it was that poetry brought to one's quality of life. Truthfully, my personal appraisal of poetry as a way to expend one's remaining minutes of existence wasn't worth listening to.

 

But immaturity and adamant ignorance, high volume buffoonery absolute confidence that popularity gained via a sort of daring, yet charming class clownishness are real variables affecting one's young judgment in many cases.

 

Poetry may have been ready for me to wake up. But, I just wasn't ready to wake up for poetry.

 

That is until  in the meanderings of my day to day obliviousness I was found myself occasionally  in the right place at the right time with a good reason to let my guard down. 

 

Do I regret my Metrophobic resistance? I don't know. There are so many roads taken and not taken; perhaps as many missed opportunities as those that were serendipitous.

 

__________

OKAY, my relationship with poetry aside, I must admit that I'm a big fan of digression ala Holden Caufield chapter 24. While writing that last paragraph, the original phrasing in the first sentence was "Do I regret my poetry-phobic resistance?" And, then I thought, "Geez, probably most people reading this are English teachers, maybe I shouldn't embarrass myself anymore than I do anyway and check to see if there actually is a fear of poetry phobia." So, off on a serendipitous digression I went. Not only is there a word, "metro phobia," but the first website I went to (http://phobias.about.com/od/phobiaslist/a/metrophobia.htm) had this to say about it in it's opening paragraph.

 

"Metrophobia, or the fear of poetry, is surprisingly common. Many people first develop this phobia in school, when overzealous teachers encourage them to rank poems according to artificial scales, break them down and search for esoteric meanings. Others simply feel that poetry is somehow “beyond” them, belonging only to the realm of the pretentious and highly educated."

 

Something to think about as we do our best to promote  Poetry month.

__________

 

And with that digression the intended trajectory of these comments shifted....

 

What if I revisited my own perceptions of my early lack of interest in poetry based upon that first paragraph about Metrophobia quoted above.Maybe, I had actually liked poetry given my fairly early enjoyment of Dr. Seuss (except for the inevitable scary pages). Maybe I found those early and risqué encounters with limericks quite interesting. Maybe it was that Pelican poem my father taught me....You know the one that goes...

 

A wonderful bird is the pelican,

His bill will hold more than his belican

He can take in his beak

Enough food for a week

But I'm damned if I see how the helican!

 

Oh it was my dad telling me a funny poem that actually used references to the words "damn" and "hell." And, it was so clever in rhyming "pelican" with "belly can" and "hell it can." 

 

Long before the phrase even existed, this brand of "out of the box thinking" captivated my imagination.

 

And maybe it was the assumption of accepted practice in teaching literary analysis, like frog dissection, was the obvious way to get kids to appreciate poetry rather than one very effective way to take the inherent wonderfulness out of poetry and kill it as dead as that frog we were dissecting in biology class.

 

But, as I look back on my own oscillating interest in poetry, there are recollections (some perhaps embarrassing others not) of key experiences that brought me out of the fog where instant rejection reigned supreme. And, the list made it very clear to me that everyone's journey to literary appreciation varies. What "did it" for me was a unique experience. The specific literary pieces that worked for me worked because of a complex interaction between the works themselves, the readiness I  had for being receptive, the influences of my own personal experiences' and perceptions of those experiences on my zone of proximal development and the artistry of those educators, friends, and real or imagined girl friends.

 

For what it's worth... among the most paradigm-altering experiences with poetry in my own journey were the following:

The Beatles' Eleanor Rigby

John Denver

Bob Dylan

Woody Guthrie

e.e.cummings

Shel Silverstein

Dr. Seuss

Joe Cocker's You are so Beautiful

"Stories and Prose Poems" by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Langston Hughes' "Harlem" (A Dream Deferred)

LeRoi Jones (I don't even remember the specific poem, but I do remember that it slammed up against the wall and made me think about things)

Gordon Parks

Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken

and even Rod McKuen

 

And, now, curiously, I find myself remembering more and more as I look for a spot to stop adding to the list. But, you can probably see what I'm seeing.

 

It was the 60's  And, I'm convinced that it was because the bridge between where I was and the poetry I"m remembering was a short bridge. I found that bridge "crossable." And, I found that in crossing that bridge, that nearby slightly longer bridges were more interesting than I'd previously thought they might be. 

 

e.e. cummings, Shel Silverstein, Dr. Seuss, limericks, and that Pelican poem my dad used to ask me if I'd ever heard every time we saw a pelican and I asked my own children every time we saw a pelican.all intrigued me in their "at the edge" of word play and out of the box thinking.

 

Bob Dylan and Arlo Guthrie led me to Woody Guthrie, Alan Lomax, and T.S.Eliot. Mark Twain's War Prayer.

 

But, the question is, "Is my particular journey from poetry-resistant to poetry-interest a prescription as in here-are-the-poems-that-got-me-so-they're-the-poems-I-should-teach?"

 

Of course not. But, they do suggest that for many, the journey to appreciation for the unappreciative might have some remarkable similarities to my journey if we find a way to begin with lyrics, and poetry, and word play, and childhood memories and experiences to which they already have a welcoming receptiveness.

 

And, what I can say is that although I am not a believer in the infallibility of data-driven decision making, I can't help but suggest that IF POETRY is worth teaching, then the data seems to be indicating that we are having a disturbingly low success rate for our efforts in promoting poetry as a welcome addition to our students' life-long reading practice.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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Olivia Sica's curator insight, October 31, 2014 11:47 AM

If you think you don't like poetry... 

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Language Magazine » Cutting to the Common Core: Analyzing Informational Text

Language Magazine » Cutting to the Common Core: Analyzing Informational Text | AdLit | Scoop.it

Given the decisive shift toward informational text reading and evidence-based response, school districts from California to New York are working earnestly to integrate more complex informational text assignments into English language arts curricula and other core subject areas. Similarly, disciplinary and grade-level teams are collaborating on writing text-dependent questions that will ensure students do more than a cursory reading. Close analytic reading of an informational text involves returning to the text to conscientiously identify significant arguments and evidence before scrutinizing the author’s support and language use.

 

Assessments requiring objective, text-dependent responses are additionally prompting teachers to refrain from instructional practices that actually discourage students from delving into complex nonfiction selections, such as assigning personal response journals or providing detailed Cornell notes for students to copy and study.

 

While these curricular involvements are well warranted, less-proficient readers and English learners will need far more than an increase in text and task complexity to engage in competent text investigation and response.


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TeachersFirst: Moving Forward with Informational Text

TeachersFirst: Moving Forward with Informational Text | AdLit | Scoop.it

To promote their understanding of increasingly more complex texts we need to help students adopt a metacognitive stance, step back, look at a given text as a whole,  and analyze its individual parts to discover how they are related and how they contribute to the whole. 


That is the intent of the Common Core's College and Career Readiness Anchor Standard #5 for Reading, which deals with text structure.   Similarly, the Common Core requires students to write informative/explanatory pieces, so to continue moving forward with the reading and writing of informational text, this month we will take a closer look at how you can explicitly teach organizational patterns in reading and have students apply these patterns in their writing.


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Deb Gardner's curator insight, January 7, 2013 12:10 PM

Reference the bottom of the webpage where a mini-lesson on teaching text structures is provided.

  • Introduction
  • Informational Text Structures
  • Teaching Guidelines
  • The Five Common Structures
  • Applying Structures
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Recommended reading: 20 texts to teach right now - Curriculet

Recommended reading: 20 texts to teach right now - Curriculet | AdLit | Scoop.it

20 recommended reading texts from Curriculet perfect for ELA & other subjects. Curriculet is free for teachers and students - sign up today!


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The Common Core: Why Reading Choice Remains Important | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies

The Common Core: Why Reading Choice Remains Important | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies | AdLit | Scoop.it

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Frances's curator insight, February 23, 2013 1:13 PM

Even as the Common Core emphasizes informational text, kids need to have choices.

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Reading Recovery: i3 Grantee Has Immediate Impact on Young Readers | ED.gov Blog

Reading Recovery: i3 Grantee Has Immediate Impact on Young Readers | ED.gov Blog | AdLit | Scoop.it
Nine principles to a successful Response to Intervention program.

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Common Core: Reading in Science Class - a How To Guide

Common Core: Reading in Science Class - a How To Guide | AdLit | Scoop.it
CCSS activities that bring literacy lessons into the science lab.

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Embedded Reading approach to cultural information

Embedded Reading approach to cultural information | AdLit | Scoop.it

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Young Adult Books-What We're Reading Now: Pamela's Picks: Best YA Titles 2011

Young Adult Books-What We're Reading Now: Pamela's Picks: Best YA Titles 2011 | AdLit | Scoop.it

Pamela Thompson , a middle school librarian in El Paso, TX, gives her best-of-the-year list for young adult fiction. Each selection is accompanied by a cover shot, an explanation of why Pamela picked the book, and a link to her review of the novel. -JL


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Common Core Reading Lessons: Grade 12

Common Core Reading Lessons: Grade 12 | AdLit | Scoop.it

CCSS English Language Arts Resources for Grade 12


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Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel - Outtakes: Is Gone With The Wind Literature? | American Masters | PBS

Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel - Outtakes: Is Gone With The Wind Literature? | American Masters | PBS | AdLit | Scoop.it
Scholars and devoted readers of Margaret Mitchell's 1936 classic novel have been arguing the book's literary merits for decades. Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel premieres nationally on Monday, April 2 from 9-10 p.m (check local listings).

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 21, 2013 12:34 PM

Fascinating questions about what the rubric criteria are for determining what makes a story great literature.

 

At 2:00 minutes a key consideration is made. There really are only about 5 or 6 stories that all writers write. And they produce millions of variations of those stories. 

 

I couldn't help but wonder... 

There are criteria that might be more likely to be agreed upon and criteria that that is less likely to be agreed upon. 

 

Eloquent articulations of wisdom seem to be a fairly safe criterion.

 

But what stories that may not be quite so eloquent, but still raise the issues associated with wisdom about impact and reach? 

 

And what about readiness and accessibility? 

 

Change the subject to food and what happens?

If nutrition is the only criterian, the question is, "What if they refuse to eat it?"

 

If enjoyment is the only criterian, the question is, "What if it's not good for you?

 

If "reading enjoyment" is disregarded then we're dismissing the essential engagement factor for storytelling's ability to reach mass audiences.

 

If "literary nutrition" is disregarded, we're missing the opportunity to encourage the development of wisdom and higher level thinking.

 

As the video suggests, Gone With the Wind falls into a gray area that scholars can happily argue about Ad infinitum with essentially no potential for reaching concensus.

 

So, my question is what if a student finds Gone With the Wind engaging and a "good read"?

 

Perhaps it's good enough. Perhaps it raises great questions, including those for which its critics pan it. And perhaps, it continues to support that students existing receptiveness to literary reading leaving him or her a bit closer to developing an appreciation for titles just on the other side of the gray area of doubt about the value of literary reading.

 

I'm just saying...

Let's not leave the value of enjoyment and potential reach out of the equation.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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Literary And Mainstream Novels: What's The Difference?

Literary And Mainstream Novels: What's The Difference? | AdLit | Scoop.it
From Writer's Relief staff: The guidelines for literary and mainstream fiction often differ from those of popular fiction such as romance novels, fantasy novels, crimes novels, etc.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 23, 2013 1:20 PM

The intention of this article is to advise writers about how publishers distinguish literary novels from mainstream novels. It does not appear to imply that literary novels are good and mainstream novels are bad. Though in its distinguishing the former from the latter, the distinctions made are probably a fairly common identificaiton of the elements generally accepted as separating the best from the rest.

 

Setting that aside, there may be something to be said about the way Literary Novels are described. Rather than define them by long standing reputation or author's literary prestige, the distinctions focus upon the "...ideas, themes, and concerns of the novelist..." and elements such as prose style. 

 

I was particuarly interested in this quote...

 

_______________

 

"The plot isn’t the main focus in literary fiction; rather, the history, social issues, and character developments that are a part of the story take precedence."

_______________

 

I often refer to this as the "yeah-but-what's-this-old-story-got-to-do-with-anything-I-care-about" factor. Or, what I was taught to call the "universal truths."

 

I like the idea that literary novels are not restricted to anyone's version of what is or ought to be in the canon. Starting with the canon or with the associated arguments over whether the canon ought to include authors who may not be dead, white, or male, still assumes that there is a core of some sort that ought to be read by all, like it or not. 

 

Yet at the same time, there are of course many novels considered to be "essential core literature" that I would quite willing to admit are certainly "go to" titles on curricular reading lists. 

 

But, I'm not so certain that there is a single title that is a "must read" for anyone. Candide? A Tale of Two Cities? To Kill A Mockingbird? Among of my favorites! But, I'm not going to have the audacity to suggest that anyone who hasn't read these titles by the time he or she is 18 isn't well-read or well-educated.

 

And, I'd go so far as to suggest that  any of the titles in the previous sentence can be replaced with any title whatsoever.

 

I wouldn't argue that these are not among the best of the best articulations of its themes. (Yes the double negative was intentional) But, I would simply say that ithey are not the only very well written stories that might raise those important issues.

 

So somewhere along the line as I was exploring the thoughts generated by this article I began wondering about the basiine reading involvement with any one of my normal high school English classes and I came up with this categorization. It's just a brainstormed concept. I'm sure there are flaws, but  it is where my mind went before I had to cut off and get about other business...

 

It is IMPORTANT to note that this early contemplation is NOT INTENDED to describe all readers, but essentially readers at the high school levels and beyond

 

There are those who...


Can Not Read 

 

Can read, used to read, lost Interest and don't read anymore

 

Can read, used to read, losing interest, particularly notable in the area of assigned reading

 

Can read, do read, read lots of mainstream, reluctant to read  "good literature"

 

Can read, do read, read wide variety including "good literature" but do so motivated more by need to "pass the test" than by enjoyment, engagement, and interest in "the history, social issues, and themes.

 

Can and do read, read wide variety voraciously and read beyond grade level and requirements and are motivated more by the enjoyment, engagement, and interest in "the history, social issues, and themes," than by the need to "pass the test."

 

Can and do read, but have begun to develop conscious or subconscious negative attitudes towards those who have not reached their own perceived levels of sophistication in literary reading.

 

I dunno. It's a rough list at best. And, as I mentioned is not intended to include any readers who have not yet reached high school age or thereabouts.  It addresses categories in readers at an age where some are on what might be called an "upward literary reading trajectory, a "static literary trajectory, and a "downward literary reading trajectory.

 

They are all our students nevertheless. And, in caring about all of them, and hoping that what we choose to do about their reading engagement, it's really hard for me to say that any single title is good for them all AT THAT PARTICULAR STAGE of their relationship with reading engagement. Perhaps there are "better stories" for some students than the stories they have read or are "still interested in reading" that are significantly closer to their Vygotskian Zones of Proximal Development than the titles that have come to have positions at the very top of the great literature lists.

 

I like to think of the evolution and development of literary reading engagement as a sort of ladder that one climbs from the inability to read to the absolute self-motivated enthusiasm for including the very best of the best in their reading life. It's more important to help students reach the next rung of that ladder than to force them via tests and other extrinsic bait to do what in the final analysis winds up discouraging an interest in making reading an integral part of the lives they are building for themselves based upon their perception of the intrinsic rewards of a life of reading.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

 

 

Marika Charalambous's curator insight, September 8, 2013 3:22 AM

I do prefer mainstream though, mostly because for me reading is time to relax, unwind from the daily stress and simply enjoy the novel. I have enough controversy in my life as it is.

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Colbert Explains Everything About J.D. Salinger

Colbert Explains Everything About J.D. Salinger | AdLit | Scoop.it
Based on some reviews of the new documentary "Salinger," we recommend skipping out and watching Stephen Colbert's Book Club devoted to the legendary author instead.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 11, 2013 5:33 PM

Nobody sees the weirdness of the world like Stephen Colbert. Who else has the vision to remind us of good ol' Holden and J.D?

 

Meanwhile, I'm re-reading Catcher in the Rye and wishing I had a class full of kids to share this with.

 

An aside, in my attempt to divert students' interest in hoarding extra credit points over actually wanting to learn more for the sake of learning more, I used to offer extra credit for bringing in as much information as they could find out about Catcher in the Rye on the internet. I told them I'd give them some puny amount of extra credit for bringing in a printout of a website about Catcher in the Ry that filled exactly on side of a piece of paper.

 

Of course I knew what Stephen finds out near the end of the video. Salinger had a crew of attorneys "discouraging" anyone who mentioned anything about Catcher on the internet.

 

Things seem to have relaxed a bit since his passing, so look for a slightly unusual take on the traditional Google Lit Trip soon.

 

 

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"Google Lit Trips" is the official business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit