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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Writing Standards: Finding One’s Way With Words

Writing Standards: Finding One’s Way With Words | AdLit | Scoop.it
2007 Winner of the Bechtel Prize by Anna Sopko   Content standards were developed by the California State Board of Education to encourage the highest achievement of every student, by defining …
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Write On!
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What To Consider When Writing Mental Illness

What To Consider When Writing Mental Illness | AdLit | Scoop.it
Let's talk about how you can fairly and accurately present mental illness in your story and characters, and examine the reasons you might want to do so.

Via Judith van Praag
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Judith van Praag's curator insight, October 24, 9:40 PM
If you're thinking about introducing characters who suffer from a mental disorder, or illness, be careful not to add to the stigma. Robert Wood makes excellent points every writer should keep in mind. 
Use this article as a check list, nobody benefits from a cavalier attitude in regards to describing depression, bipolar, anxiety disorder, chronic psychosis, PTSD etc. 
And nobody IS there illness, every person is more complex than that. Do your homework, do research, a well informed writer can help end stigma and creative complex, believable characters. 
Author Joss Burnel's curator insight, October 26, 1:53 PM

be gracious, be informed, be real

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Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension

Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension | AdLit | Scoop.it
Data suggest that taking notes by hand beats typing notes on a laptop for remembering conceptual information over time.

Via Les Howard, Luciana Viter, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD, Penelope
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, October 17, 2:36 PM
It is not only effective for long-term comprehension and retention. There are other benefits. Writing is a right brain activity as we usually are taking short cuts in notes. Keyboarding is a left brain activity. A conversation engages both hemispheres.


Penelope's curator insight, October 18, 11:37 AM
I've read about many a famous author who writes first drafts in longhand on yellow legal pads. Personally, I like the feel of writing with pen and paper, then transcribing into a Word document. This process seems to fully engage the creative brain.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
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"Third Person Point of View in Fiction and Novel Writing" | The Algonkian Author Salon - A Project Source for Agents and Publishers

"Third Person Point of View in Fiction and Novel Writing" | The Algonkian Author Salon - A Project Source for Agents and Publishers | AdLit | Scoop.it
Third Person Point of View in Fiction and Novel Writing, authored by Michael Neff

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Judith van Praag's curator insight, October 19, 6:20 PM
Great, comprehensive article on the significance and use of Third Person Point of View and it's variations by Algonkian Director Michael Neff. Get down with those acronyms!
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from A Writer's Notebook
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How To Go From Mindmap To Outline

In this video, we'll show you how to turn your mindmap into an outline for your book.

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10 Tools & Resources for Developing Writing Skills

10 Tools & Resources for Developing Writing Skills | AdLit | Scoop.it
Over the last couple of months I've found and written about a number of really great tools and resources to help improve our students' writing skills. This is a collection of links to reviews of ten of the best.

Via Nik Peachey, Jim Lerman
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, October 23, 8:34 AM
Explore and try a couple from this diverse variety of resources.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 9, 1:42 AM
10 Tools & Resources for Developing Writing Skills
D33ana Sumadianti's curator insight, November 16, 4:00 AM
Share your insight
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from A Writer's Notebook
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Why You Need a Writing Retreat and How to Make the Most of It

Why You Need a Writing Retreat and How to Make the Most of It | AdLit | Scoop.it

As I write this, I’m in a house on the tip of Cape Ann in the dead of winter, in a place where I don’t know a soul. I couldn’t be happier. I’m on a writing retreat.


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7 Easy Ways to Support Student Writing in Any Content Area

7 Easy Ways to Support Student Writing in Any Content Area | AdLit | Scoop.it
More teachers are being asked to support student literacy in all content areas. For those trained in English language arts, this isn’t a big deal. But if you have spent your career learning best practices in science, social studies, physical education, music, math, or one of many other content areas, the idea of “teaching” students how to write on top of covering your own content may seem impossible.

Good news: It’s not all that complicated, and it doesn’t have to be time-consuming, either. You don’t need an English degree to get really good at helping students build writing proficiency in your content area. In this podcast episode, you’ll learn seven easy strategies (plus one bonus tip) to support student writing skills without having to stop teaching your content.

You can get this information by reading the cheat sheet below, listening to the 28-minute podcast, or reading the full transcript.

Via Jim Lerman
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5 Tips for Writing a Memoir

5 Tips for Writing a Memoir | AdLit | Scoop.it
Will Boast: If fiction is the art of invention, memoir is the art of selection and arrangement.

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Judith van Praag's curator insight, October 24, 12:06 AM
Will Boast, humbly mannered writer of this article, addresses grief experienced after losing his mother, brother and father in close succession. Reading the opening excerpt of his book Epilogue convinced me I'll have to add the title to my Mourning  & Grief Scoop-it! 
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New literacy program aims to deliver rich content at Cadillac elementaries

CADILLAC — Forest View Elementary first-graders in Keri Powell’s class flexed their muscles Wednesday afternoon.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from A Writer's Notebook
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Prose Contests With Upcoming Deadlines | Poets & Writers

Prose Contests With Upcoming Deadlines | Poets & Writers | AdLit | Scoop.it
Below is a list of contests with deadlines in the second half of September.

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Ebook and Publishing
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7 questions we should ask about children’s literature

7 questions we should ask about children’s literature | AdLit | Scoop.it
White nationalism is on the rise in the US and nativism is in the ascendant across the globe. What role can literature for children play in teaching the next generation to be more empathetic, to respect difference, and to reject hatred?

Via Marianela Camacho Alfaro
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Ebook and Publishing
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How to add Audible narration to Kindle for iPad and iPhone

How to add Audible narration to Kindle for iPad and iPhone | AdLit | Scoop.it
Want to listen to audiobooks on your iOS device? You can get a dedicated app, but you can also do it with your Kindle app.
Via Marianela Camacho Alfaro
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20 Types Of Learning Journals That Help Students Think

20 Types Of Learning Journals That Help Students Think | AdLit | Scoop.it
Writing is thinking; there are as many types of learning journals as there are ways to think. Here are 20 that are well-suited for critical thinking.
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Get the Hemingway Editor for Mac and PC

Get the Hemingway Editor for Mac and PC | AdLit | Scoop.it
Tighten Up Your Prose

The Hemingway Editor cuts the dead weight from your writing. It highlights wordy sentences in yellow and more egregious ones in red.

Keep It Simple

Hemingway helps you write with power and clarity by highlighting adverbs, passive voice, and dull, complicated words.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

For 20 bucks, this app will polish up your writing so it reads better than a Ph.D. dissertation. Really, it's very good and well worth the investment. I almost never recommend an app that is not free. This one's an exception!


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How a Month of NaNoWriMo Can Lead to a Lifetime of Better Writing | WritersDigest.com

How a Month of NaNoWriMo Can Lead to a Lifetime of Better Writing | WritersDigest.com | AdLit | Scoop.it
by Grant Faulkner When I first became a writer, I marveled at the magical worlds my favorite authors created—their lyrical prose, their riveting plots, the

Via elearning hoje, Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, October 19, 10:49 AM
If you haven't yet written the great American novel, then you might want to take the leap into NaNoWriMo. If writing 50K words in a month won't get that book jump started, I don't know what will.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
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"A Plot Outline in Six Acts" by Michael Neff : The Six Act Two-Goal Novel | The Algonkian Author Salon - A Project Source for Agents and Publishers

"A Plot Outline in Six Acts" by Michael Neff : The Six Act Two-Goal Novel | The Algonkian Author Salon - A Project Source for Agents and Publishers | AdLit | Scoop.it
"A Plot Outline in Six Acts" by Michael Neff : The Six Act Two-Goal Novel

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Judith van Praag's curator insight, October 20, 11:49 AM
Every article or book I've read on story telling and plot, every screen writing workshop I've taken, all teachers' advice goes back to, or refers to the Greek classics. There's nothing new under the sun. Mentors such as Syd Field, John Truby and here, writer of this article Michael Fenn, they all get it. Story structure is ancient, but not history. 

Plotting is both complicated and not at all. For me the most difficult thing is not to bring too much into a story. Since I always see a larger context, I find it difficult to focus on a storyline that's limited, and focused on a certain problem that needs to be resolved within a certain timeline, a certain story. 

Limitation may be experienced as limiting, but it may also mean greater freedom. Now there's something for us to ponder.

Creating within a given structure means you (that's me) can let go of most all of the extraneous connections. Working with an ancient structure means you don't have to invent the wheel. 
Compare working with MS-DOS (where you had to know all the coding, and understand how and why something worked) versus working with Apple, or Windows. 

The latest devices are easy to use, and yet often too difficult for older folks. Why? Because they (we) want to understand why something works a certain way, and since we're not all programmers, this may be too much. Whereas a child intuitively pushes a button, Eh, voila! It works. "Een kind kan de was doen," or "A child can do it (the laundry)," with the push of a button. Ergo, instead of breaking your (my) head over the meaning of plot, just fill in the blanks already. 

Opting for the still of Misery, a favorite movie, I'm aware I'm setting myself up with another problem. I understand the author character is the protagonist, but the scary woman has an agenda of her own ... What to make of that? That's a strong antagonist for you. Could you make a case for her being the protagonist? Shut up! 
Confusion (in my case) is the result of overthinking, too much thinking. To see whether the ancient structure works, let's fill in the blanks, and see what happens.
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Ask the Editor: How to Outline a Non-Fiction Book

Ask the Editor: How to Outline a Non-Fiction Book | AdLit | Scoop.it
An outline is the writer’s blueprint. In the latest from the Xulon Press blog "Ask the Editor" series, we review the two most popular techniques.

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7 Mistakes To Avoid When Writing Your Memoir

7 Mistakes To Avoid When Writing Your Memoir | AdLit | Scoop.it
Part biography, part storytelling, part personal essay, part exposé, and even part novel, memoir vexes even the most adept of authors. Because a memoir is so

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Judith van Praag's curator insight, October 23, 3:19 AM
Do you know the difference between a memoir, and your memoires? Have you been journaling for therapeutic reasons or writing for publication? Check out The Creative Penn's Guest Blogger Dana Sitar's 7 solutions to what could be a problem when you are hoping to publish a memoir.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from A Writer's Notebook
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Best writing retreats for 2017 & 2018

Best writing retreats for 2017 & 2018 | AdLit | Scoop.it

Best writing retreats for 2017 & 2018


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Flow Map for Writing – Explanation

Flow Map for Writing – Explanation | AdLit | Scoop.it

"You can see from the picture the parts of the flow map and its purpose.  It’s very self-explanatory.

Why do I enjoy the use of these thinking maps for my inner city students?  It is a visual way to organize writing.  I want to tap into as many modalities as possible when I teach, this is one way to tap the strength of my visual learners."


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A Step-by-Step Plan for Teaching Argumentative Writing

A Step-by-Step Plan for Teaching Argumentative Writing | AdLit | Scoop.it

"...let’s begin with argumentative writing, or persuasive writing, as many of us used to call it. This overview will be most helpful to those who are new to teaching writing, or teachers who have not gotten good results with the approach you have taken up to now. I don’t claim to have the definitive answer on how to do this, but the method I share here worked pretty well for me, and it might do the same for you. If you are an experienced English language arts teacher, you probably already have a system for teaching this skill that you like. Then again, I’m always interested in how other people do the things I can already do; maybe you’re curious like that, too."


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The Writing Reader | Creativity Prompts for Writers, Journalers, Artists and Speakers

The Writing Reader | Creativity Prompts for Writers, Journalers, Artists and Speakers | AdLit | Scoop.it

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Hyphens, Em Dashes, En Dashes—Everything You Need to Know

Hyphens, Em Dashes, En Dashes—Everything You Need to Know | AdLit | Scoop.it
The use and typesetting of hyphens, en dashes, and em dashes

Via Marianela Camacho Alfaro
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11 Secrets to Writing Effective Character Description

11 Secrets to Writing Effective Character Description | AdLit | Scoop.it
Are your characters dry, lifeless husks? Writing effective description is the secret to breathing new life into them. Author Rebecca McClanahan shares 11 secrets.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, October 25, 3:24 PM

Make your characters real with vivid descriptions.

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Books to Watch For: 8 New Books for ‘Downton Abbey’ Fans (Source: @Bookbub) | Sara Rosett

Books to Watch For: 8 New Books for ‘Downton Abbey’ Fans (Source: @Bookbub) | Sara Rosett | AdLit | Scoop.it
Sara’s Take: I was pleased to see several mysteries on this list of books for fans of Downton Abbey. I’m looking forward to several of them, including Anna Lee Hubers’ This Side of Murder. I love the vintage feel of the cover. What about you? What books are you looking forward to reading this fall?  …
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