1) Identifying and working with dyslexic students 2) Standardized Testing
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Dan Rather Reports, "Teaching to the Test" Excerpt

Saying it's a waste of time, teachers in Seattle are refusing to give standardized tests to high schoolers because the tests don't effectively assess student...
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Scrap the Map! Is the slogan used by faculty and students at Garfield High School in Seattle to show their disapproval with standardized testing. The map test, or measures of academic progress, is given to students by the northwest evaluation association and is believed to do more harm than good. History teacher James Hagopian was quoted in this report by Dan Rather by saying that the test is deeply flawed and that “teachers in ninth grade algebra are seeing questions on the test relating to geometry.” The test is not aligned to their curriculum and he later discusses the fact that if we follow along with this test, we end up at a destination of unfairness and inequality. I agree with this teacher because these students will take the test, do poorly because it is not what they are being prepared for and finally being unfairly placed due to these low scores. It doesn’t seem fair. So what is the solution to their problem? The teachers at Garfield High School decided to boycott the MAP test and their movement spread across the north west. They have already gotten support from the national education association and the AFT. From what this news report has told me about the MAP test, I think it’s great that these people are taking a stand to fight for better testing. I believe the people who make these tests need to better understand what is going on in the classrooms today and the administration needs to realize that these test hurt the students. While I support the boycott, I wonder what will happen to Garfield and the other high schools if they continue on and not take the test. Will the students fail? How will the administration fix this?

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Four Things All Educators Should Understand About the Dyslexic Brain

Four Things All Educators Should Understand About the Dyslexic Brain | 1) Identifying and working with dyslexic students 2) Standardized Testing | Scoop.it

"What do you think of when you hear the word dyslexic? All too often the reflex reaction is a stream of negative associations -- "slow reader," "under performance," "extra time on exams," "difficulty spelling." While it is true that these are common symptoms in students with dyslexia, they are surmountable problems. For any educator, the key to unleashing academic success in dyslexic students lies in understanding how their brains work."


Via John Evans
Hayley Groff's insight:

I believe this is a great resource for teachers trying to learn more about the dyslexic brain. 

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+ Adolescents and Adults with Dyslexia: It’s Never Too Late

+  Adolescents and Adults with Dyslexia: It’s Never Too Late | 1) Identifying and working with dyslexic students 2) Standardized Testing | Scoop.it

It is often assumed that students above the third or fourth grade have acquired sufficient decoding skills and that the struggles they continue to have are simply related to comprehension difficulties. But older dyslexic students still have problems with word recognition. Because they haven’t benefitted from years of reading and targeted instruction, they are often held back by lack of vocabulary, background knowledge and this is a huge component of their comprehension difficulties.


Via Lou Salza
Hayley Groff's insight:

Like Allison Swartz, she didn't find out about her dyslexia until she was 20. 

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8 Classroom Accommodations for Dyslexic Students (That Benefit ALL Students)

8 Classroom Accommodations for Dyslexic Students (That Benefit ALL Students) | 1) Identifying and working with dyslexic students 2) Standardized Testing | Scoop.it
8 ways you can accommodate your classroom to meet the needs of your dyslexic students - tips from Shantell Berrett, Reading Horizons Dyslexia Specialist.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 20, 2013 6:52 AM

What I like about this blog is the format elucidating how the accomodations necessary for those students with dyslexia improve instruction and the learning experience for all students--Lou

Excerpt:

 

"Here are eight tips from Berrett that you can implement in your classroom to better accommodate the learning needs of the dyslexic students (while benefitting all of your students)...


Checkout # 3 of 8 tips: 

"3. Preview & Review


How it helps dyslexic students: 
By previewing each concept before instruction, dyslexic students can better organize, filter, and prioritize new information. Reviewing each concept helps dyslexic students connect, store, and categorize information that was just presented. Both of which, help with the Executive Function Deficits associated with dyslexia.

How it helps all students: 
One of the most effective ways we learn any concept is through repetition. The more we hear and practice a concept, the more natural and easy to remember it becomes."


 

Brenda Elliott's curator insight, April 21, 2013 9:34 AM

Love the concrete  steps- helps children with ADHD too!

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Dyslexia for Teachers of EFL

Dyslexia for Teachers of EFL | 1) Identifying and working with dyslexic students 2) Standardized Testing | Scoop.it

Foreign language teachers often lack sufficient understanding of the nature of dyslexia and the difficulties it causes in foreign language learning and are not familiar with the relevant teaching techniques and methods to further the language learning processes of dyslexic students. Therefore the preparation of teacher training materials for this target group of language learners is both timely and highly needed.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, November 15, 2013 4:49 AM

This site contains a free 10 unit course for teachers of English as a foreign language and helps them to support students in their classroom who have dyslexia.

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Dyslexia

Dyslexia | 1) Identifying and working with dyslexic students 2) Standardized Testing | Scoop.it
KId's Dyslexia, Apt description of something that to me was never easy to comprehend
Hayley Groff's insight:

I found this chart on Pinterest and it outlines what dyslexia is and the advantages and disadvantages. Some advantages to the disability that I didn’t know before are that dyslexic kids have strong 3-D visual and spatial skills. Meaning they are good at visualizing a 3 dimensional structure from plans. Another strength that I learned was they can easily see the big picture and show creativity in solving problems. Some weakness addressed in this diagram are problems with organization and time keeping, problems with written language spelling and writing, and most commonly delayed speech. I believe this diagram is helpful because it not only reiterates the disadvantages of dyslexia, but also touches on the strengths of a child with the disorder which can greatly boost a dyslexic child's confidence.

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dyslexia_handbook_teacherstrategies.pdf

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This handout is for teachers who are unfamiliar with how to deal with a student who is diagnosed with dyslexia. This 22 page document covers everything from educating the teachers about the disease, the causes effects, and how it’s diagnosed, to how to make the right accommodations for your dyslexic student in the classroom. I believe an important thing for every teacher to know is how to detect dyslexia. This is outlined in the document very clearly and shows the common signs of a dyslexic child in Pre-k and kindergarten through fourth grade. In Pre school, talking later than the other students and trouble rhyming are common signals that teachers should be aware of. In K-4, troubles with small words such as as or the or a slow connection between letters and sounds could also be signals. I think it’s crucial for teachers to know this because of the pain that a dyslexic child could feel because they think they’re stupid and not as quick as everyone else. The document then goes onto how teachers can accommodate these kids to make their education more beneficial. Things like using a tape recorder and developing reading guides where the two that stood out the most for me as they both provide a road map where the student can easily go back and review. Testing for dyslexic students should also be put into consideration and the document clearly outlines what is needed to be done. I believe this document is full of useful information and that every teacher should be aware about how to detect dyslexia and how to accommodate.

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Video: NCLD Asks, ‘How Much Do You Know About Dyslexia?’

Video: NCLD Asks, ‘How Much Do You Know About Dyslexia?’ | 1) Identifying and working with dyslexic students 2) Standardized Testing | Scoop.it
Our team at the National Center for Learning Disabilities visited Madison Square Park in New York City to separate fact from fiction when it comes to LD.
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Online visual learning for Dyslexia. Education for Dyslexic students.

Online visual learning for Dyslexia. Education for Dyslexic students. | 1) Identifying and working with dyslexic students 2) Standardized Testing | Scoop.it
Education and online learning for teaching children with Dyslexia and an ideal visual educational solution for dyslexic students with reading problems (Resources for Dyslexia Can Improve Your Child's Ability Greatly!

Via Collection of First
Hayley Groff's insight:

Great accomidation! 

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Strengthening Self-Image in Dyslexic Students

Strengthening Self-Image in Dyslexic Students | 1) Identifying and working with dyslexic students 2) Standardized Testing | Scoop.it

Psychologist Michael Ryan and his tips for strengthening self image: recognizing MIND strengths, identifying passions and interests, and encouragement.


Hayley Groff's insight:

Very true! 

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Angela C. Dowd's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:33 PM

This is good information. Finding a way to connect with your child's interests can sometimes be challenging...but it's essential. Praising just enough and using the right words for the moment is an art form.

DyslexicIT's curator insight, May 24, 2013 2:17 AM

After years at school feeling failure every hour of every day - building self-esteem is vital.

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Study Finds E-Readers Help Dyslexic Students by Limiting Text

Study Finds E-Readers Help Dyslexic Students by Limiting Text | 1) Identifying and working with dyslexic students 2) Standardized Testing | Scoop.it
E-reading devices such as the Kindle and iPad were shown to help dyslexics read and process text over a traditional paper book.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
Hayley Groff's insight:

Also good resource for technology in the classroom. 

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What's It Like Being Dyslexic?

This comic tells the story of a dyslexic kid struggling at school. Find out typical dyslexic difficulties and their strengths. Based upon the school days of ...
Hayley Groff's insight:

This video does a great job demonstrating to the viewer what it feels like to be a student with dyslexia. The story follows Tom, a boy with extreme low self esteem because he can’t seem to find anything he is good at. He can’t read as fast as everyone else, hates taking tests, and eventually doesn’t even want to go to school. His teacher passes it off as him being lazy but when his mother takes him to a doctor, it is confirmed that Tom has dyslexia. I think this video would be really beneficial to young kids who have just been diagnosed who don’t really know how to feel. They can relate to Tom and go on his journey with him. Throughout the story, Tom learns that there are many others like him like Albert Einstein and Keira Knightley and that there is nothing wrong with his brain, he just uses it differently! The video tells kids that while they’ll have to do extra lessons, they’ll be taught in a way that they can learn best and can even be fun. The end of the video provides some comic relief by Toms teacher getting down on his knees and apologizing for calling him lazy, which kids will find very funny. I definitely think this video should be shown to kids with dyslexia because it will increase their confidence, give them someone to relate to, and learn more about what is going on in their heads.

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What Extra Time Gives a Dyslexic: A Firsthand Look * The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity

What Extra Time Gives a Dyslexic: A Firsthand Look * The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity | 1) Identifying and working with dyslexic students 2) Standardized Testing | Scoop.it
Hayley Groff's insight:

Allison Swartz is a deslysic girl who despite years of adversity, just aquired her masters degree from Columbia University. She wrote an article for The Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity explaining her time as a student with this disability and how it was extra time that really helped her succeed. This article really stood out to me because of the example she gives of “nightmare 1 and nightmare 2”. Nightmare 1 starts out with you walking into an exam and realize you have no idea how to answer any of the questions. You end up turning in a sheet of paper that might as well have been blank. Nightmare 2 goes on by you know all the answers but spend so much time re-reading the question that you know you’ll never finish in time. Along with that, you are also dyslexic and have to decode the letters on the page. These examples made me realize that it didn't matter how much time the person in nightmare 1 got, they still wouldn't know the answers, but if the student in nightmare 2 were just given a bit more time, she would be able to succeed. I found it really interesting that she was not diagnosed with dyslexia until her early twenties and I would like to know about other accommodations that were given to her. Her strive to push through her dyslexia really spoke to me as I myself struggle with a disability. This article showed me inside a mind of a dyslexic student and has definitely given me tips to better myself as a teacher.

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300 Multiple Choices

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This section for the Yale Center of Dyslexia and Creativity lists helpful accommodations for dyslexic students. These accommodations include more time to complete tests and assignments, course substitutions, highlighters, spell check and even some more costly things such as computer programs. Some helpful programs listed are ones that help in organizing ideas, writing in real time, and word prediction software. Before looking on the Yale Center of Dyslexia and creativity I didn’t know the specific accommodations that were needed. I believe that every aspiring teacher should learn more about dyslexia and what they need to do to make sure each child is given an equal opportunity to succeed. I do wonder if a dyslexic student is from a low income family will the school be able to provide the student the materials they need. I would definitely like to look more into that and see how many accommodations are necessary.

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