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Int'l Call for MonoVisions Photography Award 2017 - Art Rubicon

Int'l Call for MonoVisions Photography Award 2017 - Art Rubicon | acropolis | Scoop.it
MONOVISIONS BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS Deadline for Entries: June 11, 2017 Entry Fees: Series $25 USD; Single $20 USD MonoVisions Photography Awards are an international open call for photographers using black and white medium to express their visual language. CALL FOR ENTRIES – B&W PHOTO CONTEST Our aim is to discover the best monochrome photographers [&hellip

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Larry Matthews's curator insight, May 24, 2017 7:48 AM
Int'l Call for MonoVisions Photography Award 2017 - Art Rubicon
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Methanol detected for first time around young star

Methanol detected for first time around young star | acropolis | Scoop.it
Methanol, a key building block for the complex organic compounds that comprise life, has been detected for the first time in the protoplanetary disk of a young, distant star. This finding could help scientists better understand the chemistry occurring during a planet's formation that could ultimately lead to the emergence of life.

Scientists made the methanol discovery around TW Hydrae, a star about 80 percent of our sun's mass and roughly 5 million to 10 million years old. It represents a younger version of what our solar system may have looked like during its formation more than 4 billion years ago. At about 170 light-years away, TW Hydrae has the closest protoplanetary disk to Earth.

The methanol appears to be located in a ring peaking 30 astronomical units from the star. (An astronomical unit, or AU, is the average distance between Earth and the sun, or about 93 million miles.)

This methanol gas likely came from methanol ice located slightly further away from the star. The scientists detailed their findings in the paper, "First detection of gas-phase methanol in a protoplanetary disk," published the journal Astrophysical Journal Letters.

"Methanol is an important molecule because it has been shown in laboratory ice experiments to be a feedstock of larger and more complex molecules," said study lead author Catherine Walsh, an astrochemist at the University of Leeds in England. "The successful detection of methanol in a protoplanetary disk provides compelling evidence that larger molecules are also present."

Via Mariaschnee, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Checking a Website’s Security

Checking a Website’s Security | acropolis | Scoop.it
Q. I was browsing online and noticed a small letter “i” in a circle. What does that mean? I use the Chrome browser.

A. The web is full of sites that do not use the strongest security, and some browsers — including Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox — now warn users when the page they are visiting may put their information at risk. In Chrome, that “i” symbol indicates a site may not be secure because it is using an unencrypted connection to exchange data with your computer. When you click the “i” on the left side of the Chrome address bar, you can see more information about the site, adjust some settings and possibly see a “Your connection to this site is not secure” warning.

Via John Evans
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Cool Cat Teacher’s 31 Favorite Everyday Tools I’m Using Right Now #edtech

Cool Cat Teacher’s 31 Favorite Everyday Tools I’m Using Right Now #edtech | acropolis | Scoop.it

"Do you want to know my productivity tips and tricks? How about what I use for digital film class? The technology I use in my classroom everyday? Well, Happy Valentine’s Day! I’m showing love to my dear teacher friends by just sharing all the tools and tips that have me excited right now. I’ve included links below for you."


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Hate Owning A Car? This New SUV Is Designed To Be Shared

Hate Owning A Car? This New SUV Is Designed To Be Shared | acropolis | Scoop.it
A new car brand helmed by a Volvo alum wants to sell you a car that you can share through a smartphone.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, November 1, 2016 4:54 AM
Esto es adaptarse a los tiempos...
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2,000-Year-Old Pompeii Home Reconstructed in 3D

2,000-Year-Old Pompeii Home Reconstructed in 3D | acropolis | Scoop.it
With new 3D scans of Pompeii, archaeologists reconstructed the 2,000-year-old home of a wealthy Roman banker.

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This is where your smartphone battery begins

This is where your smartphone battery begins | acropolis | Scoop.it
Workers, including children, labor in harsh and dangerous conditions to meet the world’s soaring demand for cobalt, a mineral essential to powering electric vehicles, laptops, and smartphones, according to an investigation by The Washington Post.

Via Seth Dixon
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James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 10:21 AM
As sad as this is, what I think is more sad is that I have to admit when I first saw this headline while scrolling my initial thought was "Oh yeah, I need to buy a new phone battery". I think this says a lot about the differences in culture and priorities of those cultures. We in further developed countries do tend to take things for granted. There are things we get and throw away in a day that some in far off lands spend days to even obtain, with their lives sometimes depending on it.
David G Tibbs's curator insight, March 29, 3:36 PM
We take the luxuries that we have for granite and forget where it comes from, or who pays the physical price for us to have them. One example is electronics and the Congo. The Congo is a country filled with Colbolt which is critical to lithium batteries which powers majority of products that are rechargeable. The price they pay is unsafe mining conditions, indecent wages, and environmental hazards to local communities. 60 percent of the cobalt used today comes from the Congo, and while some companies track it to make sure its "clean" some companies do not check its origins. In 2010 there was a push to add cobalt to a list of resources that come from the Congo to be from a militia free mine. Individual companies have started to be stricter about where they get their Cobalt it's still not mandatory under international law. However with the demand for cobalt is increasing due to more electric power styling for vehicles and other products. In order to meet these demands the cobalt will continue to come from abused people until companies or international law limits and outlines how to deal with the cobalt question.
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Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 21, 2:10 PM
Given the absurd amount of minerals present in the country, the Democratic Republic of the Congo should be basking in immeasurable wealth. However, as shown by this inetractive and enormously in-depth piece by the Washington Post, the country constantly struggles with child labor, water pollution, and widespread dangerous working condition because of the global demand for minerals like cobalt and copper. 
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Descubren restos humanos del naufragio de Antiquitera

Descubren restos humanos del naufragio de Antiquitera | acropolis | Scoop.it
Los arqueólogos han descubierto un peso de plomo para medir las profundidades y restos humanos de una persona que quedó atrapada durante el naufragio del siglo I a.C. Fotografía de la última campaña de excavaciones cerca de la isla griega de Antiquitera. Foto: Ministry of Culture, Greece Fuente: Alec Forssmann  |  NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC 19 de…

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SEE WHAT IS HAPPENING ON A STREET NEAR YOU - Street I Am -

SEE WHAT IS HAPPENING ON A STREET NEAR YOU - Street I Am - | acropolis | Scoop.it
NEW CITIES ADDED EVERY DAY  CLICK ON ANY CITY FOR STREET CULTURE NEWS AND POSTS    CHECK OUT AN EVENT  BUSKERS Find Out About Street Culture Happenings Past Present or Future in a Place Near You

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London street artist paints heartbreaking tribute to 5-year-old Syrian boy

London street artist paints heartbreaking tribute to 5-year-old Syrian boy | acropolis | Scoop.it
UK street artist Pegasus has painted a tribute to 5-year-old Omran Daqneesh, the Syrian boy whose photo was widely shared last week.
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The Roman Theatre of Orange

The Roman Theatre of Orange | acropolis | Scoop.it
The Roman theatre of ancient Arausio (modern day Orange in southern France) is one of the best-preserved examples from antiquity. Built in the 1st century CE, it once had capacity for 9,00
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The Vatican’s Gallery of Maps Comes Back to Life

The Vatican’s Gallery of Maps Comes Back to Life | acropolis | Scoop.it
In the 16th century, Pope Gregory assigned the monk and geographer Ignazio Danti to carry out the project. In turn, Danti hired several artistic stars of the day and up-and-comers as well to illustrate the maps, including Girolamo Muziano, Cesare Nebbia and the Flemish brothers Matthijs and Paul Bril. The Brils excelled at landscape paintings—an essential skill for the work.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 3, 2016 12:01 PM

This 4-year restoration project is a great cultural revival, but it also reveals the importance of geographic information.  The Vatican was a great medieval seat of both religious authority and political power.  This attracted prominent visitors from all over Europe and the map gallery served to convey geographic information about the Italian peninsula.  

 

Tagsart, Italy, historical, Europe, religiontourism, Christianity.

Loreto Vargas's curator insight, August 6, 2016 6:30 PM
Wonderful and amazing
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Where our food came from

Where our food came from | acropolis | Scoop.it

"Explore the geographic origins of our food crops – where they were initially domesticated and evolved over time – and discover how important these 'primary regions of diversity' are to our current diets and agricultural production areas."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 14, 2016 2:57 PM

This is an incredibly rich website with great interactive maps, dynamic charts, and text with rich citations.  This is one of those resources that an entire class could use as a starting point to create 30+ distinct project.  This is definitely one of the most important and best resources that I've shared recently, one that I'm going to use in my class.  Where did a particular crop originally come from?  Where is it produced today?   How do these historic and current agricultural geographies change local diets and economies around the world?  All these issues can be explored with this interactive that includes, but goes beyond the Columbian Exchange

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, APHG, unit 5 agriculture, globalizationbiogeography, ecology, diffusion.

Sally Egan's curator insight, June 16, 2016 6:43 PM

Great interactive map to illustrate the source regions of the world and foods that originated there. Hover over each region and the foods of that area popup.


Rory McPherson's curator insight, July 3, 2016 5:39 PM

Very informative! It's great to learn where our food comes from. The author is able to communicate this information through simple but effective maps and visualizations.

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Human Antibodies in #Ebola Survivor's Blood Effective Against All Strains

Human Antibodies in #Ebola Survivor's Blood Effective Against All Strains | acropolis | Scoop.it
a discovery by scientists at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine offers reason to be optimistic: they have found the first human antibodies that can shut down all strains of ebolavirus.
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The arrhythmic beating of a black hole heart – Astronomy Now

The arrhythmic beating of a black hole heart – Astronomy Now | acropolis | Scoop.it

At the center of the Centaurus galaxy cluster, there is a large elliptical galaxy called NGC 4696. Deeper still, there is a supermassive black hole buried within the core of this galaxy.

New data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes has revealed details about this giant black hole, located some 145 million light years from Earth. Although the black hole itself is undetected, astronomers are learning about the impact it has on the galaxy it inhabits and the larger cluster around it.

 

In some ways, this black hole resembles a beating heart that pumps blood outward into the body via the arteries. Likewise, a black hole can inject material and energy into its host galaxy and beyond.

 

By examining the details of the X-ray data from Chandra, scientists have found evidence for repeated bursts of energetic particles in jets generated by the supermassive black hole at the center of NGC 4696. These bursts create vast cavities in the hot gas that fills the space between the galaxies in the cluster. The bursts also create shock waves, akin to sonic booms produced by high-speed airplanes, which travel tens of thousands of light years across the cluster.

 

The composite image shown contains X-ray data from Chandra (red) that reveals the hot gas in the cluster, and radio data from the NSF’s Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (blue) that shows high-energy particles produced by the black hole-powered jets. Visible light data from the Hubble Space Telescope (green) show galaxies in the cluster as well as galaxies and stars outside the cluster.

 

Astronomers employed special processing to the X-ray data to emphasize nine cavities visible in the hot gas. These cavities are labeled A through I in an additional image, and the location of the black hole is labeled with a cross. The cavities that formed most recently are located nearest to the black hole, in particular the ones labeled A and B.

 

The researchers estimate that these black hole bursts, or “beats”, have occurred every five to ten million years. Besides the vastly differing time scales, these beats also differ from typical human heartbeats in not occurring at particularly regular intervals.

 

A different type of processing of the X-ray data reveals a sequence of curved and approximately equally spaced features in the hot gas. These may be caused by sound waves generated by the black hole’s repeated bursts. In a galaxy cluster, the hot gas that fills the cluster enables sound waves – albeit at frequencies far too low for the human hear to detect – to propagate.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Cool Cat Teacher’s 31 Favorite Everyday Tools I’m Using Right Now #edtech

Cool Cat Teacher’s 31 Favorite Everyday Tools I’m Using Right Now #edtech | acropolis | Scoop.it

"Do you want to know my productivity tips and tricks? How about what I use for digital film class? The technology I use in my classroom everyday? Well, Happy Valentine’s Day! I’m showing love to my dear teacher friends by just sharing all the tools and tips that have me excited right now. I’ve included links below for you."


Via Jim Lerman, BUCostantino
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Objects beyond Neptune provide fresh evidence for Planet Nine

Objects beyond Neptune provide fresh evidence for Planet Nine | acropolis | Scoop.it

Discovery of icy worlds in the distant solar system offer new clues in searches for hypothetical giant.

 

New solar system objects used to be a distraction for Konstantin Batygin, a planetary scientist and theorist at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena. Each discovery added another complication to his computer models of the solar system, which twirl planetoids around the sun. But now, Batygin is eager to find more of the objects himself, and missed opportunities pain him. In late September and early October, cloudy skies foiled a 6-night run at the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii. All you can do, he says, is “just sit quietly and wait for things to get slightly better.”

 

What drew Batygin into the hunt is the ultimate prize: a new planet, the first to be added to our solar system in more than a century. Colloquially called Planet Nine, this distant hypothetical world could have 10 times the mass of Earth and take 15,000 years to go around the sun. This past January, Batygin and Mike Brown, a Caltech astronomer, proposed that the giant could explain the peculiarly clustered orbits of six icy bodies beyond Neptune. Now, several teams, including Batygin and Brown’s, are racing to spot Planet Nine directly.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Create and share cartoons, comics and memes online

Create and share cartoons, comics and memes online | acropolis | Scoop.it
Create comics, cartoons and memes online. Share your creations on Facebook, Twitter or Google+. Free online cartoon maker and comic creator.

Via Nik Peachey
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Ana Dias's curator insight, October 24, 2016 7:28 AM
comics for learning
Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, October 24, 2016 8:34 AM
Love this new Comic-Cartoon Creator. Thanks, Nic Peachey
Agron S. Dida's curator insight, October 26, 2016 2:37 PM
Very good and simple to use :-)
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The history of African-American social dance

Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 5, 2016 4:18 PM

Dance is more than just a way to have fun; dance reflects cultural forms of expression and communal identity.  This Ted-Ed talk demonstrates the rich cultural heritage that can be seen in particular cultural traits (such as food, clothing, dance, music, etc.).  This is bound to be a fun, vibrant way to show the how cultural patterns and processes play out using something that young people generally enjoy. 

 

Tags: culturediffusion, popular culture, music, race, historicalthe South, TED, video.

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Historia del alfabeto latino | Wikiwand

Historia del alfabeto latino | Wikiwand | acropolis | Scoop.it
El alfabeto latino que actualmente es uno de los sistemas de escritura dominantes tiene un antiguo origen y ha sufrido una larga evolución histórica desde su aparición en el siglo VII a. C.

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Programa matutino en el Coliseo: gladiadores contra bestias

Programa matutino en el Coliseo: gladiadores contra bestias | acropolis | Scoop.it
“Panteras que tiraban dócilmente de la boga a la que habían sido enganchadas; leones que llevaban en sus fauces a la liebre viva que habían atrapado; tigres que lamían la mano del domador que les daba latigazos; elefantes que se arrodillaban gravemente ante el palco imperial o que escribían en la arena con la trompa…

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Google and Street art

Google and Street art | acropolis | Scoop.it
That outlaw freedom jumped time and space last week when the Google Street Art Project announced it was doubling its worldwide database by adding 5000 new images.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Wonderful Indonesia - World Expo 2012

A Short Movie, presented in Indonesia Pavilion at World Expo 2012 in Yeosu, South Korea. Ibujari Production Music by Ben Gunawi more info: www.worldexpo2012....

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Hellenistic Warfare

Hellenistic Warfare | acropolis | Scoop.it
When Alexander the Great died in 323 BCE, he left behind an empire devoid of leadership. Without a named successor or heir, the old commanders simpl
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New study predicts a universe crowded with black holes

New study predicts a universe crowded with black holes | acropolis | Scoop.it

A new study published in Nature presents one of the most complete models of matter in the universe and predicts hundreds of massive black hole mergers each year observable with the second generation of gravitational wave detectors.

The model anticipated the massive black holes observed by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory. The two colliding masses created the first directly detected gravitational waves and confirmed Einstein's general theory of relativity.

 

"The universe isn't the same everywhere," said Richard O'Shaughnessy, assistant professor in RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences, and co-author of the study led by Krzysztof Belczynski from Warsaw University. "Some places produce many more binary black holes than others. Our study takes these differences into careful account."

 

Massive stars that collapse upon themselves and end their lives as black holes, like the pair LIGO detected, are extremely rare, O'Shaughnessy said. They are less evolved, "more primitive stars," that occur in special configurations in the universe. These stars from the early universe are made of more pristine hydrogen, a gas which makes them "Titans among stars," at 40 to 100 solar masses. In contrast, younger generations of stars consumed the corpses of their predecessors containing heavy elements, which stunted their growth.

 

"Because LIGO is so much more sensitive to these heavy black holes, these regions of pristine gas that make heavy black holes are extremely important," O'Shaughnessy said. "These rare regions act like factories for building identifiable pairs of black holes."

 

O'Shaughnessy and his colleagues predict that massive black holes like these spin in a stable way, with orbits that remain in the same plane. The model shows that the alignment of these massive black holes are impervious to the tiny kick that follows the stars' core collapse. The same kick can change the alignment of smaller black holes and rock their orbital plane.

The calculations reported in Nature are the most detailed calculations of its kind ever performed, O'Shaughnessy said. He likens the model to a laboratory for assessing future prospects for gravitational wave astronomy. Other gravitational wave astronomers are now using the model in their own investigations as well.

 

"We've already seen that we can learn a lot about Einstein's theory and massive stars, just from this one event," said O'Shaughnessy, also a member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration that helped make and interpret the first discovery of gravitational waves. "LIGO is not going to see 1,000 black holes like these each year, but many of them will be even better and more exciting because we will have a better instrument--better glasses to view them with and better techniques."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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