ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio
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ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio
This portfolio was created to show all that I have learned in ACOM375 Fall 2011.
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Filtering/Curating: Twitter

Filtering/Curating: Twitter | ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio | Scoop.it

Filtering/Curating is when you take something that has a lot of different answers and zoom in on one specific answer or topic. Twitter is a social networking site that comes out with tons of different topics a second. According to Teresa Gorman's article on PBS, "an average of 155 million tweets are posted on the social networking site Twitter each day." Those tweets are never about the same topic. Most of them are on millions of different topics that different users want to discuss.

 

Gorman's article discusses a new tool that journalists use for the curation of social media called Storyful. This tool has many affordances that twitter also has, if a user only tries hard enough. Storyful curates the millions of different stories put on their site and gives journalists what they want to know about, all through a simple search. "Clinch described the service as a type of social media news agency that provides lists of sources and content for a price to their pro subscribers."

 

Twitter has these same affordances on their website. When people post with a hashtag, those posts get grouped together. If someone wants to know something about ESPN, all they would need to do is type in #ESPN and the content they are looking for will be narrowed down into the one topic they want. Twitter also allows users to follow people and then creates a list of people you may want to follow based on who you are currently following. This curates all of the users on Twitter into groups that you may or may not find interesting, which makes it easier to find what you are looking for.

 

Resources:

http://twitter.com/

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2011/04/social-media-curation-tool-separates-news-from-noise.html

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Formal CMC: Blackboard Discussion Board

Formal CMC: Blackboard Discussion Board | ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio | Scoop.it

Hrastiaski's article discusses formal CMC, which is considered to have the qualities of "being schedueled, have arranged participants, an agenda, one-way communication, impoverished content, and formal language and speech register." The blackboard discussion board for this class was used during class time in order to complete certain projects. It falls under formal CMC for a few reasons.

 

The blackboard discussion board was utilized during a preset time during class, with people that were randomly placed in the group by our professor. We discussed formulated topics and had to figure out answers to specific questions and problems. These discussion boards were monitored, so the language was mostly formal and allowed us to communicate with one another while working together on one specific project. While it does fall under both formal and informal CMC, it gravitates more towards the formal side because of it's preset agenda, participants, and language.

 

Resources:

https://blackboard.albany.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_5081_1%26url%3D
http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf 

 

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Community Building: Twitter

Community Building: Twitter | ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio | Scoop.it

Twitter is a social media tool used to link people who are friends, who like the same things, or who want to know more about certain people, places, or organizations. Savethemedia.com posted an article about how to build your twitter account. Their blog states, "Step one: Get followers: Twitter is only of value to promote blog traffic if you have a sizable number of followers, preferably interested in your niche topic." They reccommend that you get yourself out there to build your personal community by following people who follow you, follow people you know and people you don't know, and by searching keywords. All of these tools are important to build a community to get yourself known. 

 

Community building is important for a new business who is trying to get their name of the ground or for someone who wants to learn more on a certain topic. Twitter is the perfect website for this because it enables the user to connect with many different people on the same level. You can follow anyone you want (some need to be approved by the user) and you can talk to them via the messanger. If someone makes their friends list public, then you can also find people like them that you may want to know more about.

 

Twitter organizes it's website in a way that enables you to be found by others if you so choose to be. You can tag your posts with a keyword, so others can find your tweets through a simple search. You can also share your tweets easily between different social media sites, such as Facebook.

 

Resources:

http://twitter.com/
http://savethemedia.com/2009/03/09/youre-on-twitter-now-what/ 

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Identity Development: Facebook

Identity Development: Facebook | ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio | Scoop.it

Facebook is a place for people to create an online identity to show other people who are also using the website. Identity development is the way in which you present yourself to your online community. You can remain anonymous on Facebook without a picture (or a picture that is not you) and by making up a pseudonym. You can also make yourself very public to others by posting every significant piece of information about yourself (i.e. full name, birthday, phone number, school, likes/dislikes)

 

According to Joinson's article, "anonymity of others to the self (i.e. visual anonymity) leads to heightened self-awareness, and thus to greater adherence to group norms when a social identity is salient." Facebook's identity development could be slighted due to the fact that people are nervous because they are posting themselves online, so this could potentially harm full identity development.

 

Joinson's article also states, "For instance, Franzoi and Davis (1985) found that adolescents high in private self-consciousness were more willing to disclose information about themselves than those with low private self-consciousness." If people don't fully develop their identity on Facebook, they may be willing to disclose more information because it is a lower chance of somebody finding out who they are. If a user is more public and less private, they will likely be unwilling to express their full feelings because of fear of rebuttal by fellow friends on Facebook.

 

Resources:

https://www.facebook.com/
https://blackboard.albany.edu/bbcswebdav/courses/2119-ACOM-375-9281/Joinson%20self%20disclosure%20in%20cmc.pdf 

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Web 2.0: Blogger

Web 2.0: Blogger | ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio | Scoop.it

According to nonforprofitorgs blog post, "Web 2.0 is the beginning of two-way communication in the online public commons." Public commons can be considered places where people talk to other people and discuss topics and ideas through two-way communication. The blogger that we use for our class and personal blogs can be considered Web 2.0 because it offers a platform to share ideas and comment on other bloggers post's. When there is a capability for others to comment on your posts, it becomes two-way communication, which makes it equal to Web 2.0.

 

Nonforprofitorg's blog post also states, "It’s one person or organization publishing content to many on social networking sites who then re-publish your content to their friends, fans, followers, connections, etc." Our bloggers are our own publications through our own research and can be shared over social networking sites, as well as through email and chat with a link. These blogs have a section for comments, in which we can communicate with others, as well as communicate our blog to others.

 

Resources:

http://newwaystocommunicatecmc.blogspot.com/2011/10/dabbleboard-online-interactive.html
http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/ 

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Networking: Linked-In

Networking: Linked-In | ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio | Scoop.it

Social networking sites are online places where people can meet and interact with others. According to Boyd and Ellion, "most sites support the maintenance of preexisting social networks, but others help strangers connect based on shared interests, political views, or activities." LinkedIn is one of these sites, in which you can connect with friends, old and new, to share ideas and connections. Websites like LinkedIn are important for people looking to stay connected with old friends, but who are looking for new people to help expand their work and social life.

 

LinkedIn has many affordances. One of the most popular is the way that it connects you with others that can help you furthur your career. LinkedIn is mostly used by people looking for careers, or people in differents jobs looking to learn new ideas or interact with new people. LinkedIn offers many opportunities to make these contacts and network with others.

 

Boyd and Ellison also state, "While socially-organized SNSs solicit broad audiences, professional sites such as LinkedIn, Visible Path, and Xing (formerly openBC) focus on business people." LinkedIn is a business social networking site, but also follows the same structure of any other social networking site. They have a 'friends' list, a profile, and a place to update statuses and comment.

 

Resources:

https://blackboard.albany.edu/bbcswebdav/courses/2119-ACOM-375-9281/boyd-ellison%20social%20network%20history.pdf
http://www.linkedin.com/ 

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Informal CMC: Twitter

Informal CMC: Twitter | ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio | Scoop.it

According to Hrastiaski's article, "Informal conversations 'take place at the time, with the participants, and about the topics at hand.'" These conversations can be sporadic and can be about anything. Twitter is a social media tool that allows many people to interact at once about any topic. On Twitter, you can search a specific keyword and 're-tweet' ideas that someone has, or 'reply' or 'direct message' someone to spark a conversation about a topic.

 

Hrastiaski's article also gives certain guidlines that encompass informal CMC. These guidelines are, "unscheduled, random participants, unarranged agenda, interactive, rich content, informal speech, and speech register." Twitter is a social media site that allows anyone to join, and most users allow anyone to see their posts or allows people to follow them without acceptance. The conversations are unscheduled because so much is popping up on your 'timeline' at once from whoever you are following. These conversations will never be scheduled because anyone can join and although you may be on Twitter at a certain time talking to one person, another follower can join the conversation at anytime by simply retweeting what you said or hashtagging what you are in order to get in on the conversation.

 

Twitter also only allows 140 characters per post, so most posts are in short-hand CMC language. You can post links in your tweets, which allows them to be filled with a lot of information at once, therefore their context is able to be rich.

 

Resources:

http://twitter.com/

http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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CMC Language: Facebook

CMC Language: Facebook | ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio | Scoop.it

Susan C. Herring wrote an article about CMC language that discusses the different ways that people interact in a text-based environment. In Herring's article it states, "most CMC currently in use is text-based, that is, messages are typed on a computer
keyboard and read as text on a computer screen, typically by a person or persons at a different location from the message sender." Text-based communication is used on Facebook, the social networking website that links people with others and lets people create an online profile. Users interact mostly in short-hand CMC language that is faster and more efficient to use in a text-based environment. The interact through messages, Facebook chat (instant messanger), and comments/wall posts.

 

Herring's article also states, "another deliberate practice that results in unconventional orthography is the textual representation of auditory information such as prosody, laughter and other non-language sounds." CMC language can also be different letters put together to mimic sounds people make to emit different emotions. On Facebook posts, users will type "hahaha" to show laughter and amusement. They may also type "wahhhh" to depict crying/whining about a topic that they aren't happy about. CMC language is all different types of interactions, which come together to illustrate exactly what the person is saying or how they would try and say it in face-to-face communication.

 

Resources:

http://www.facebook.com/

http://www.let.rug.nl/redeker/herring.pdf 

 

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Web 3.0: Fandango

Web 3.0: Fandango | ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio | Scoop.it

Fandango is an example of Web 3.0. Fandango is a website in which you can see upcoming movies, buy tickets, read synopses, and look at or utilize the comments section. According to nonforprofitorg's blog, "Web 3.0 ... is no longer limited to desktop and laptop computers while stationary in one place. It’s the Internet on the go fueled by mobile phones and tablets." Fandango's website has many capabilities, which make it fall under the category of Web 3.0

 

Nonforprofitorg's blog also states, "Smartphone Apps enable content to be published and shared easily while on the go." Fandango has a mobile app that allows the user to use the features on the site in a compact way on their mobile phone through a website, or even Fandango's smartphone app for Android and iPhone users. Web 3.0 is a mix of Web 1.0 and Web 2.0, but gives users the capability to use it anywhere. Fandango gives out information about movies and tickets to users, which falls under Web 1.0. The website also gives users the ability to communicate with others through comments on movie pages about whether or not they liked the movie, which helps Fandango fall under Web 2.0. Since it has those capabilities and is also available on-the-go, Fandango falls under Web 3.0.

 

Resources:

http://www.fandango.com/
http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/ 

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Web 1.0 - RelayForLife.org

Web 1.0 - RelayForLife.org | ACOM375 - Lisa Belli's E-Portfolio | Scoop.it

According to nonforprofitorgs blog post, "Web 1.0 is one person or organization pushing content out to many people via websites and e-mail newsletters." Relay For Life's website, relayforlife.org, is an example of web 1.0 because the website is a one-way communication tool for people to learn about the fundraiser Relay For Life. On the website, you are able to donate, sign-up for newsletters, and read a ton of information on the organization.

 

Relay For Life's website falls under web 1.0 for the reasons listed above and other reasons. Their website is focused on pushing out information to it's readers and visitors. Since there is no option for two-way communication, nor a mobile app, relayforlife.org is a simple one-way communication website. Relay For Life communicates through e-mailed newsletters, thank you emails for donations, and the ability to read information about the organization. All of this falls under the description of Web 1.0 given by nonforprofitorgs blog post.

 

Resources:

http://www.relayforlife.org/index
http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/ 

 

 

 

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