ACOM 375 CMC
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ACOM 375 CMC
This is a portfolio of work from our UAlbany CMC class.
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Twitter Language

Twitter is a great example of language. When you think hash tag I bet most of you think Twitter. Hash tag is specific to Twitter. If I were to send you a message and it had hash tags in it, you would be confused, the hash tag use outside of Twitter doesn't make sense. The purpose of the hash tag is to sort content and to help people communicate easier on Twitter. If I wanted to look up a particular TV show on Twitter I would search it with the hash tag, this would make it easier to see what was happening. You can also be interactive using hash tags. Every Halloween the show Ghost Hunters does a live investigation, during the live show you can tweet with the cast members. You get to tell them if you saw something that maybe they missed or validated that you saw what they saw. On Twitter your characters are also limited to 140 characters. You may have to abbreviate your words to shorten what you want to say. This form also may not be appropriate in other settings. If I were sending an email to my boss I certainly wouldn't use abbreviations and hash tags.

 

Masullo-Chen, G. (2011) How to use twitter hashtag. Save the media blog. Available at http://savethemedia.com/2011/03/04/howtousetwitterhashtag/

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Informal CMC

 

This video was created by my class group as an introduction to our project on why you should use Skype. We wanted to keep it informal because we wanted it to be more relatable and real. We didn't really schedule this, we used informal language, and although everyone participated we didn't have a script on what everyone would say, or an order of who would go and when. You can see in the video we didn't have an order because there are pauses between speakers. Behind the scenes you wouldv'e seen us pointing at one another to go next. The content is delivered one-way, there is no interaction between us and the audience. The form in which we chose to record was up to us, the participants, and we couldv'e chosen any form we wanted. We also chose to be focused on experience rather than content. We thought that instead of spilling facts out we would tell you why we used Skype and how it helped us. We really wanted this video to be informal although we do have some aspects of being formal, for example the one-way communication.

 

Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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LinkedIn - Mode of CMC

LinkedIn is another example of a mode of CMC. With LinkedIn you want to be interesting, you want to be appealing to potential employers so you want to give them a reason to want you. Be honest, you want your information to be accurate on what you post. Be humble, know what the rules of the site are.

 

Kaplan, A. & Haenlein, M. (2010) Users of the world, unite! The challenges and

opportunities of Social Media. Business Horizons 53, 59-68. Available online library at Science Direct database.

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Twitter - Mode of CMC

Twitter is an example of a mode of CMC. Twitter is a social networking site which is a part of Web 2.0. Web 2.o allows for two-way communication; people can comment, respond and even share what you've posted. The public aspect of social media sites allows for "Followers" and "Fans". Twitter allows you to create a personal profile as well as "Follow" other users and have other users "Follow" you. Twitter also allows users to share pictures and videos.

 

Nonprofitorgs (2010). Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits. Available at: http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

 

Kaplan, A. & Haenlein, M. (2010) Users of the world, unite! The challenges and

opportunities of Social Media. Business Horizons 53, 59-68. Available online library at Science Direct database.

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Delicious.com - [Culture]

This stack from Delicious.com is an example of curating. By providing stack with multiple links you are controlling the information you want everyone to see. You can post one topic at a time. This allows for the information not to be too overwhelming to the people using it. You can also filter the stack by adding tags so it is easily identified to a certain topic.

 

Gorman, T. (2011) Social Media Curation Tool Storyful Helps Separate News From Noise. Available at

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2011/04/social-media-curation-tool-separates-news-from-noise.html

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Formal CMC

Formal CMC | ACOM 375 CMC | Scoop.it

This blog post is the completed project from our group. We kept the blog formal because we wanted to convince an older audience, who don't use Skype, to use it. This blog, unlike our video, was way more scheduled, everyone had a part to write and we were focused on facts rather than experiences this time. We needed to sound credible to our audience so it was important for our posts to be written in a formal language. It even looks more put together and higher cost than our original video. We had a preset agenda in what we wanted to present to our audience and how we wanted to do it. We decided on a one-way form of communication because we assumed if they weren't using Skype they may not be using other forms of interactive sites.

 

Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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Digital Identity

This blog post explains why your identity online is important. Self-promotion and image management is important to maintain over the internet. For that assignment we were asked to search ourselves, a younger relative, and an older relative and compare the differences of their profiles online. It is important to have an idea of how you look on the internet and how you want to look on the internet. LinkedIn is a great example of how you want to be, your "ideal self". It is what other people's impressions of you are. Potential employers may see your "ideal self" on LinkedIn and be very impressed while if they see your "true self" on Facebook, they may be less than impressed. Revealing one's "true self" is expected in an intimate setting. For instance it is ok to show who you really are to friends, family, and your spouse. The best thing about the internet is you can control what information is given about you. If you are limited in your profiles or are anonymous then you control what other people's impression may be. For instance my Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/carriealice89) is my "true self", I have a lot of information about myself, my likes/dislikes, photos, a lot of personality goes into my profile. I also have it so only my friends see my true self. My LinkedIn (http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=77777046&trk=tab_pro) account is my "ideal self", my profile on there is how I want to be viewed, especially in a professional way. My blog (http://uacmctools.blogspot.com/) is my "ought to be self", where my thoughts and how people view me is how I ought to be/act all the time. Credibility plays a big part as well. On my blog and LinkedIn I want to be taken seriously, that my opinion and/or experiences really matter and that I'm not going to be disregarded just because I'm still a student. Even on my Facebook I want to be viewed as being true to myself. My friends, the people who really know me, can agree that I am really the way I appear on my profile.

 

Ellison, N., Heino, R., & Gibbs, J. (2006). Managing impressions online: Self-presentation processes in the online dating environment. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 11(2), article 2.http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol11/issue2/ellison.html

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Facebook - Mode of CMC

Facebook is what we think of when we think CMC. Everybody has a Facebook and it is a great site for networking. Like Twitter, Facebook is a part of Web 2.0, it is a two-way communication. You can "Like", comment, and "Share" statuses, links, videos, and photos. This is also considered "content communites". You can also create your own profiles, provide as much or as little information in it as you want. You can invite friends and send instant messages/emails to other users.

 

Kaplan, A. & Haenlein, M. (2010) Users of the world, unite! The challenges and

opportunities of Social Media. Business Horizons 53, 59-68. Available online library at Science Direct database.

 

Nonprofitorgs (2010). Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits. Available at: http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

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Twitter and Networking

I think we all are aware of what Networking is. Twitter is an example of this. Social Networking sites like Twitter help us expand outside what and who we know. For one of our assignments we were asked to ask a question only using Social Networking sites. People you didn't even know were answering your questions. Your network, outside of your friends, family, collegues and classmates, has expanded to anyone with an account. The reading discusses how Facebook was once just for Harvard students, which grew to all college students, which grew to high school students, which grew to corporations, which then grew to what we know today where its open to everyone. Like Facebook, Twitter is open to everyone, this means that no matter what you are interested in everyone can find a group/people that share the same interests. The reading also discusses that the use of Facebook and other social networking sites, that it is important to maintain relationships created offline. By using social networking sites you can keep in touch with all your friends close and long-distance.

 

Boyd, d. m., & Ellison, N. B. (2007). "Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship." Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), article 11. Available at Library in eholdings database.

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Community

This blog post is describing what Community is. A great example, as described in the post, is Facebook. Facebook is a social media site that connects a lot of outside sites it it as well as the profiles within. Facebook provides some social capital. It allows for users to draw resources and information from other sources. The internet can have a negative affect on social capital as well. The internet may decrease social capital because face-to-face interactions will decrease because of the use of the internet.

 

Ellison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook "friends:" Social capital and college students' use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(4), article 1. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ellison.html

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