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Innovative Coaching Models

Innovative Coaching Models | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it

Discover 2 innovative teaching coaching models. Both virtual coaching and real time coaching are great professional development models for teachers.


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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, February 15, 2014 10:33 AM
#CCSS implementation will require close scrutiny of instructional practices. Not only do we need to teach kids how to effectively close read, we need to be close readers of our own practice. This process can be more efficiently applied using a coaching model.
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Free Technology for Teachers: 10 Good Video Sou...

Free Technology for Teachers: 10 Good Video Sou... | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
Free Technology for Teachers: 10 Good Video Sources for Math Students and Teachers on Educational Technology curated by SElmore (Free Technology for Teachers: 10 Good Video Sources for Math Students and Teachers | @scoopit via @galloised
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Text to Text | The Gettysburg Address and ‘Why the Civil War Still Matters’

Text to Text | The Gettysburg Address and ‘Why the Civil War Still Matters’ | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
We honor the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address this month by matching it with two opinion pieces that offer opposing perspectives on the legacy of Abraham Lincoln's famous speech.

Via DT Hernandez, Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
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Opinion and Argument Writing and The Common Core State Standards

Opinion and Argument Writing and The Common Core State Standards | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
Writing Opinions and Arguments The Common Core State Standards require students to write opinion pieces starting in early elementary school.

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, December 2, 2013 10:14 AM

There is a distinct difference between opinion writing, persuasive writing, and argument or position writing. Seems like some people are starting to really figure that out and share their insights with others. Common Core asks primary grade students to write opinions, middle school students to write persuasively, and upper middle and high school students to be able to take a position on an issue and support that position intellectually. Before kids can learn how to do this, teachers need to understand the difference.

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Mathway | Math Problem Solver

Free math problem solver answers your algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, and statistics homework questions with step-by-step explanations, just like a math tutor.
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Academic Vocabulary and the New Wave of Testing: 'Words used in context'

Academic Vocabulary and the New Wave of Testing: 'Words used in context' | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it

David Coleman, the current president of the College Board, has a particular take on academic vocabulary; and, if you want to better prepare your students for the new wave of standardized testing under the Common Core and the new SAT, you better get hip to it. As he told the New York Times, Coleman believes academic vocabulary is all around us, and he is out to rid the SAT of "words you will never use again" and plans to instead focus standardized testing on "more common words like synthesis, distill and transform, used in context as they will be in college and in life."


Via Mel Riddile, Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 8, 2013 5:58 PM

Sample SBAC vocabulary question:


Read the sentence from the text. Then answer the question.

"Nanodiamonds are stardust, created when ancient stars exploded long ago,disgorging their remaining elements into space."

Based on the context of the sentence, what is the most precise meaning ofdisgorging?

  1. scattering randomly
  2. throwing out quickly
  3. spreading out widely
  4. casting forth violently
Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, September 9, 2013 9:42 AM

Educators: you must understand Isabel Beck's concept regarding the three tiers of vocabulary! That is the basis for academic vocabulary as referenced in the Common Core. Robert Marzano and the Common Core's references to academic vocabulary are NOT THE SAME. Isabel Beck and the Common Core classify domain / disciplinary vocabulary as Tier 3 or academic vocubulary. Marzano's academic vocubulary consists of disciplinary terms--Tier 3 vocabulary under the Beck matrix. There seems to be much confusion about the term academic vocabulary. We need to be on the same page with shared vocabulary. Read Beck's Bringing Words to Life: http://www.amazon.com/Bringing-Words-Life-Vocabulary-Instruction/dp/1572307536

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Achievethecore.org :: Common Core Informative/Explanatory Writing

Achievethecore.org :: Common Core Informative/Explanatory Writing | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
This Common Core instructional resource focuses on CCSS.W.2:

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, September 26, 2013 9:56 AM

Looking for grade level samples for the informative/explanatory Common Core writing standard (WA.2)? Check this out. Samples for every grade.

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ELA/Literacy Lessons Published by Achieve the Core

ELA/Literacy Lessons Published by Achieve the Core | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it

What it is: A library of almost 300 free, teacher-developed Common Core-aligned lessons for grades 3-10. (Grades K-2 coming soon).

 

Why it matters: Teachers can use these Common Core-aligned lessons immediately in the classroom or for professional development.

 

Who creates these materials? Hundreds of teachers worked collaboratively to develop these materials, followingdeep training on the Common Core by Student Achievement Partners. Each lesson has been authored, edited and reviewed by a team of teachers.


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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, September 30, 2013 11:44 AM

A reliable resource for teachers working to meet the content and rigor of the Common Core Standards.

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Cool Cat Teacher Blog: 15 Wrong Ways to Implement the Common Core

Cool Cat Teacher Blog: 15 Wrong Ways to Implement the Common Core | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it

As I was talking to Johnna from Discovery Education about this post, I started hearing her talk about districts who are struggling with Common Core. We thought that it would be helpful to know what people are doing to cause their districts to fail in implementation. Of course, if we learn from failure, we can fail forward into success. Thanks Johnna for this guest post. 


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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, October 6, 2013 1:53 PM

Non-examples can be as powerful as good examples. Many schools are practicing one or more among this list of 15 Watch-out-for... The Common Core is no magic bullet and neither are single, discreet sets of materials and/or methods. 

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Are we confusing reading and writing instruction with assessment of that instruction?

Are we confusing reading and writing instruction with assessment of that instruction? | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
Testing and teaching are not the same thing. Some educators are blurring the lines.

 

"As a profession, we are confusing reading and writing instruction with assessment of that instruction. Many teachers strive, as I did, to insert “test-like” experiences within the context of their units to decrease the stand alone skills practice that high stakes testing often causes, but the truth is undeniable. We are increasingly blurring the lines between instruction (teaching and learning) and assessment of instruction (tests to measure teaching and learning)."


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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, November 8, 2013 11:55 PM

I so agree! Good points! Although schools must prepare students for taking assessments, assessment preparation and assessment results should not be mistaken for good teaching and/or actual student outcomes.

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 11, 2013 6:40 AM

If I'm reading this article correctly, the author does call into question elements of the Common Core Assessment's questionable "side affects" while at the same time not condemning the the intent of assessment.

 

The author's question raises the valid point that there is a difference between instruction and assessment of that instruction. If instruction becomes test prep then test prep becomes the perceived importance of the content. And, in the case of literary reading, the "side effects" of this lack of distinction between what ought to be central and what has become central is perhaps seriously misdirecting student attentiveness. 

 

In my mind, this does not mean that assessment is unimportant and therefore ought to be abandoned. It means that we should be mindful that the purposes for literary reading are not the same as the purposes for attempting to measure the achievement of benefit derived from literary reading. And, if we are mindful of the distinction, then, as was the case for promoting "formative assessment structures," perhaps current literary assessment structures can evolve in such ways as to be less intrusive and thereby less likely to misdirect classroom practices that are more likely to divert students' attentiveness and engagement away from  the actual value of literary reading  and more likely to capture evidence that students' recognize the reasoning behind the advise provided to those who spend time exploring the wisdoms articulated across time and cultures by history's wisest spokespersons. Perhaps assessment structures can continue to evolve to a point where students will demonstrate understanding beyond merely being able to merely identify WHAT the themes are in a piece of great literature,, but also be able to demonstrate an understanding of WHY those themes are worth his or her engaged and serious contemplation.

 

I hope that my take is not Panglossian optimism about the potential for further improvement of the current state of literary reading assessment, but rather the optimism of people such as Martin Luther King who perceived a problem long inadequately unaddressed yet continued to believe, in spite of history's significant evidence to the contrary, that good things could still  be done to more successfully address issues of serious concern.

 

Or maybe Atticus Finch was just an old fool. 

 

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

Jefferson Hall IV's curator insight, September 7, 2015 5:38 PM

Teaching and the evaluation of teaching need to be further separated nationally in the United States. In my elementary, middle, and high school experiences, there has been too much emphasis placed on the estimation on how much students our learning rather that of what we are learning. Specifically, I can recall teachers giving us there examples of what a proficient and advanced essay should entail and forcing us to regurgitate that form time and time again for the soul purpose of meeting state standards. This process does not promote learning, insight, or originality. It deprives students of the chance to actually learn how to formulate their own well written essay. The author of this article, Mary Rudd, exclaims teaching the “habits of mind” through reading and writing to promote efficient learning. Using reading and writing to instigate critical thinking is very poignant to the learning process. Mary Rudd and her long standing career in education validate her credibility of this article.

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10 Ways Literacy Can Promote A Deeper Understanding Of Math

10 Ways Literacy Can Promote A Deeper Understanding Of Math | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it

10 Ways Literacy Can Promote A Deeper Understanding Of Math ("@KentPolen: 10 Ways #Literacy Can Promote A Deeper Understanding Of Math http://t.co/H9QPnVerdD via @teachthought" #mathchat #ccchat)...


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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, November 11, 2013 11:40 AM

We need more realization that if kids don't understand words, they cannot solve mathematical problems. Great illustration!

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Using Science Texts to Teach the Organizational Features of Nonfiction - ReadWriteThink

Using Science Texts to Teach the Organizational Features of Nonfiction - ReadWriteThink | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
Students explore organizational features of nonfiction science. Students then work together to create a two-page spread using those features to present information about their local environment.

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, October 28, 2013 10:54 AM

This lesson plan specifically draws on scientific text to support numerous Common Core Standards for informational text across the strands of reading, writing, speaking & listening as well as language. 

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200 Prompts for Argumentative Writing

200 Prompts for Argumentative Writing | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
For a coming student contest in which teenagers are invited to write on an issue they care about, we have gathered a list of 200 writing prompts on a wide range of issues.

Via Deb Gardner, Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
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Deb Gardner's curator insight, February 5, 2014 6:39 AM

What evidence will students use to support their claim?

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, February 6, 2014 8:42 AM

The New York Times provides a good starting place for building an evidence based claim as students meet writing standard number 1: write arguments. But in writing arguments, the Common Core Standards ask students for "sufficient evidence" to support their claim. This in turn causes students to research which supports three writing standards: 7, 8, and 9. This set of standards comprise the writing substrand Research to Build and Present Knowledge. This is a good starting place for both ideas and motivation as well as resources.  

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CCSS Argument versus Opinion Writing, Part 1

CCSS Argument versus Opinion Writing, Part 1 | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
"What is the difference between the Common Core argument and opinion writing?" I'm addressing this with a group of middle school teachers tomorrow and it seems to be a question frequently asked in ...

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Common Core Resources - Provided by Professional Educators of Tennessee but Valuable for Educators Nationwide!

Common Core Resources - Provided by Professional Educators of Tennessee but Valuable for Educators Nationwide! | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, November 25, 2013 11:27 PM

This link will take you to a listing of quality sites for Common Core Supports.

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Long-click to Find Definitions, Pictures, Videos, and More

Long-click to Find Definitions, Pictures, Videos, and More | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it

"Curiyo is a browser extension, available for Firefox and Chrome, that makes it easy to quickly find definitions, videos, pictures, and related reference materials for any word you select in your browser. When you're reading an article online and come across a word that you don't recognize or a word that you're just curious about, long-click on it and a pop-up box containing definitions, pictures, videos, and more will appear."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:56 AM

Curiyo looks like a great tool for students but it does require Chrome or Firefox as a browser. Quickly download the app and Curiyo is installed. As you read articles you will find that some items may have dots below them. If you click in these areas information will pop up that provide additional information and this may include information from news sources, Twitter, YouTube, Wordnik and more. You can "long-click" a word which requires you to hold your mouse button down over the word for one second and information will also pop up. By moving off the window that has popped up the information will close. Consider how this might help students researching new topics.

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Common Core Lesson Ideas | Roz Linder.com

Common Core Lesson Ideas | Roz Linder.com | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
The prototype assessments developed by PARCC have an entire category of questions devoted to students providing textual evidence.

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, August 28, 2013 9:10 PM

Roz is a quality source of Common Core information and instructional methods!

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Achievethecore.org :: In Common: Effective Writing for All Students

Achievethecore.org :: In Common: Effective Writing for All Students | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
The Common Core Standards emphasize the integration of content understanding and writing.

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, September 26, 2013 9:50 AM

Are you in need of writing samples to fill out gaps left in the Common Core's Appendix C? Check out this Achieve the Core website. On this page you'll find links to the three types of writing: argument, inform/explain, and narrative.

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Achievethecore.org :: Common Core Argument/Opinion Writing

Achievethecore.org :: Common Core Argument/Opinion Writing | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
This Common Core instructional resource focuses on CCSS.W.1:

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, September 26, 2013 9:53 AM

Looking for grade level argument samples supporting Common Core implementation? Check this out! Examples for every grade! 

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Stepping up the Evidence! 3-8 Anchor Chart | On the Web with Roz Linder

Stepping up the Evidence! 3-8 Anchor Chart | On the Web with Roz Linder | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it

This chart typically becomes a staple in the classrooms that I work with. This is the jumping off point to begin the discussion about close reading and the notion that reading is more than just decoding, it is about thinking. This supports the idea of comprehension and interaction with the text.


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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, October 6, 2013 1:47 PM

Always appreciate Roz's work in reading and the Common Core!

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Grade 8 - ELA/Literacy | PARCC

“@CarolJago: New #PARCC 8th grade performance task w/ Gary Paulson, Jack London passages released http://t.co/1MKIrs1zv2”; #ccss

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, November 7, 2013 10:07 AM

I wondered if Gary Paulson would appear among the prototypes. As always, my concern is that some teachers will have their kids reading all of his work, now...thinking they are doing test prep. Please avoid!

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20 education buzz words and phrases | eSchool News | eSchool News

20 education buzz words and phrases | eSchool News | eSchool News | ACMS Common Core | Scoop.it
From education theories to accurate descriptors, these buzz words and phrases have been used by practically every educator in the country.

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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:16 AM

Always building my professional vocabulary. Some of the terms here have long been a part of my generative vocabulary, for instance "sage on the stage." However, there were some terms I hadn't heard before such as "future proofing" and "Sputnik moment."

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Common Core Instructional Practice Guides: History/Social Studies Grades 6-12


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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, November 16, 2013 11:49 AM

Two "things" I particularly appreciate about criteria #1 are the direct references to "text-based instruction" and "speaking": "Text-based instruction engages students in reading, speaking, or writing about texts." Too often, social studies class becomes a listening class: students listening to history teachers tell the stories of our past. But students need to be reading these texts and gathering their knowledge from text-based stories that are enhanced by teachers' insights and experiences. Unfortunately, the speaking and listening standards are not directly referenced as literacy responsibilities within the disciplines of History/Social Studies. I can't begin to express how pleased I am so see an expectation that these essential interactive skills be integrated seamlessly into the SS classroom.