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Accounting Standards Made Easy For CA Final Nov 2018 / May 2019, 9789387983106

From www.meripustak.com

Accounting Standards Made Easy For CA Final November 2018 and May 2019 - Buy Accounting Standards Made Easy For CA Final Nov 2018 / May 2019 by CA Ravi Kanth Miriyala and CA Sunitanjani Miriyala with best discount of 10% at meripustak.com.
Meri Pustak's curator insight, July 30, 1:59 AM
Accounting Standards Made Easy For CA Final November 2018 and May 2019. Also useful For CS/CMA Final, M.Com and Other Specialised Studies As per Old Syllabus.

SageNext - QuickBooks Cloud, Tax & Accounting Application Hosting

From www.thesagenext.com

SageNext Infotech is a QuickBooks Hosting provider company, have earned a strong reputation and have years of experience in hosting major Tax and Accounting Applications. Get Free trial of your QuickBooks server today.
Alan Clarc's curator insight, October 7, 2016 5:26 AM
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Best QuickBooks Cloud Hosting, QuickBooks on the Cloud - SageNext

From www.thesagenext.com

Best QuickBooks on the cloud hosting with SageNext allows to run your QuickBooks in the cloud. A complete cloud Quickbooks solution for accountants.
Alan Clarc's curator insight, September 14, 2017 4:17 AM
QuickBooks in Cloud

QuickBooks Remote Access | QB Remote Desktop - SageNext

From www.thesagenext.com

SageNext’s QuickBooks Remote Desktop Hosting services gives an ultimate remote access infrastructure using cloud with 24X7 free technical support.
Alan Clarc's curator insight, January 23, 4:47 AM
Remote QuickBooks
 

How To Find The Best Accountant For Your Small Business

From brookscity.com

Need help finding the right small business accountant for you and your team? Learn what to look for and how to find the best one.
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From www.accountingtoday.com

The latest accounting news & information for the public accounting profession, along with practice management advice.
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4 Ways to Build an Innovative Team

From hbr.org

One of the most common questions I get asked by senior managers is “How can we find more innovative people?” I know the type they have in mind — someone energetic and dynamic, full of ideas and able to present them powerfully. It seems like everybody these days is looking for an early version of Steve Jobs.

 

Yet in researching my book, Mapping Innovation, I found that most great innovators were nothing like the mercurial stereotype. In fact, almost all of them were kind, generous, and interested in what I was doing. Many were soft-spoken and modest. You would notice very few of them in a crowded room.

 

So the simplest answer is that you need to start by empowering the people already in your organization. But to do that, you need to take responsibility for creating an environment in which your people can thrive. That’s no simple task, and most managers have difficulty with it. Nevertheless, by following a few simple principles you can make a huge difference.

The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 13, 4:41 PM

It takes psychological safety, diversity, teamwork, and mission.

Can eLearning Change Behaviour? (or eLearning made me a healthy person)

Confession – I have been going to naturopaths for 40 years, but I am terrible at taking tablets, potions and sprays. I start out Day 1 with the greatest of intentions but after Day 3, I am over taking something everyday but that all changed not so long ago.

 

Having been involved in Learning all my life and now running an eLearning company, (The Learning Factor), I’ve always wondered two things:

  • Can eLearning (on-line learning) actually change behaviour?
  • Can a 12-minute eLearning module have a lasting impact on daily life?

 

One of our clients is an Australian health supplements company. They engaged our company to build a global learning platform and work with their teams in developing numerous engaging and educational eLearning courses.

 

Having a passion for excellence and always want to make sure the eLearning quality we produce has the WOW factor, I began do my own review on some of the modules we developed for them. The modules were on things like Probiotics, B Vitamins, Brain Health, Heart Health, Fish Oil.

 

I was only doing the reviews of the modules for quality control but all of a sudden, my behaviour changed, I found myself asking my wife to buy these products and I started taking them religiously.

 

The eLearning modules had a major effect on my life, they had in fact changed my behaviour. Through the learning I saw the WHY and the WIFM. I think the vignettes and the animations really crystallised in my mind and emotions that these tablets were going to make me healthier and stronger as I continued through my life.

 

Now every morning I wake, shower, shave and swallow – 12 tablets to keep me healthy. It’s not that I have to do it, I want to do this and I’ve been doing it for over a year. I even took all my tablets on a recent cruise to Alaska in little bags, one for each day!  

Can eLearning change behaviour? For me it’s a big YES!

 

Chris Gaborit is managing director of The Learning Factor, an eLearning company who loves technology linked to learning. Follow him here on Linkedin, on Twitter @droneservicesAU and Instagram @idronefoto

The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 13, 4:44 PM

 Having a passion for excellence and always want to make sure the eLearning quality we produce has the WOW factor, I began do my own review on some of the modules we developed for them.

Harish Kumar's curator insight, February 14, 7:40 AM
Today: What is the successful online business to make money? Is it Blogging? || Is it Affiliate Marketing? || Is it some other method? Solution: Each method will bring you 5-Digit Income every month. Utilize the chance when it is available. 
Use it now, start making $1000 - $2000 every month at ease. 
 

To Reduce Burnout on Your Team, Give People a Sense of Control

From hbr.org

There’s no question or debate that workplace stress levels are at critical levels and are escalating. The American Institute of Stress (AIS) reveals that 80% of us feel stress on the job and almost half say they need help in managing that stress.  The StressPulse survey by ComPsych, an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provider, shows the main causes of that stress are:  1) workload (36%); 2) people issues (31%); 3) balancing professional and personal lives (20%); and 4) job security (8%).

 

Team dynamics are also a big deal when it comes to workplace stress, in terms of the way teams operate and how team members interact with each other. The above statistics show that team dynamics directly affect a whopping 92% of what causes the most stress. 

 

Being part of a team can be a quick road to disappointment, frustration, and burnout, especially when some team members work harder than others, when some are on time and others are consistently late, when there’s drama and tension resulting from gossip, and when team leaders play favorites.

The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 1, 5:28 PM

Create a team charter.

Kim Colwell's curator insight, March 4, 5:09 PM
I've personally experienced this burnout. It's a tough one.  It's often difficult to find the courage to call it out and do something to try and change. What I found is if you have a job that on it's own has stress, just based on the nature of the job, and you add on demanding management and peers who you don't click with you are in a really difficult situation.  As mentioned in the article, team dynamics are a really huge ingredient in making a successful work environment and ultimately a successful business.    
1
Tom Wojick's curator insight, April 10, 3:03 PM

Human factors are significant contributors to accidents and injuries and stress is a factor that affects all humans. The right amount of stress can assist performance and  too much stress can can create the conditions for decreased performance and an increase in the chances for an accident or injury. 

Lessons From Social Psychology To Apply In The Workplace

From www.forbes.com

Running a successful organization requires lots of moving pieces running smoothly in tandem. At the heart of every organization are people just like you and me, whose performance can be influenced in a positive direction. Recently, companies like Google and Facebook have been redefining the standards of workplace culture, and in turn seeing improvements in employee satisfaction and company performance. Now, your company might not be large enough to have a dedicated HR (or “People Ops”) department, but there are some exciting takeaways from social psychology that you can apply to benefit your business.

 

Reciprocity Principle

Reciprocity is one of the famous “Six Principles of Persuasion” defined in Robert B. Cialdini, Ph.D.'s book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. The idea is that we feel pressure to repay others for what they have given us or done for us. We often even give back more than we were initially given to minimize any guilt associated with the initial favor.

 

Founders and CEOs can use this to their advantage. Internally, this can help improve or repair work relationships, win over co-workers and build consensus. As Dr. Cialdini writes, reciprocity is so powerful that it can overcome feelings of suspicion or dislike toward the person who gives the gift or favor. As a small business owner, how about giving gifts or bonuses on holidays or birthdays? You could also offer to bring back coffee for the office or surprise your colleagues with breakfast or lunch. A kind gesture can go a long way.

 

Outside the office, the reciprocity principle can help you succeed in negotiations, build valuable business partnerships and win over investors — or even customers! When we launched our product and were at our first trade show full of retail managers and buyers, we realized that people only stopped at our booth if we handed them a free sample. So we handed samples to everyone who walked by! In turn, they stopped, listened to our pitch, and 99% of the time they placed an order for their store. In those first few hours, we sold over 100 cases into 100 new stores.

Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 4:56 PM
From original scoop: "Running a successful organization requires lots of moving pieces running smoothly in tandem. At the heart of every organization are people just like you and me, whose performance can be influenced in a positive direction. Recently, companies like Google and Facebook have been redefining the standards of workplace culture, and in turn seeing improvements in employee satisfaction and company performance. Now, your company might not be large enough to have a dedicated HR (or “People Ops”) department, but there are some exciting takeaways from social psychology that you can apply to benefit your business. Reciprocity Principle Reciprocity is one of the famous “Six Principles of Persuasion” defined in Robert B. Cialdini, Ph.D.'s book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. The idea is that we feel pressure to repay others for what they have given us or done for us. We often even give back more than we were initially given to minimize any guilt associated with the initial favor. Founders and CEOs can use this to their advantage. Internally, this can help improve or repair work relationships, win over co-workers and build consensus. As Dr. Cialdini writes, reciprocity is so powerful that it can overcome feelings of suspicion or dislike toward the person who gives the gift or favor. As a small business owner, how about giving gifts or bonuses on holidays or birthdays? You could also offer to bring back coffee for the office or surprise your colleagues with breakfast or lunch. A kind gesture can go a long way. Outside the office, the reciprocity principle can help you succeed in negotiations, build valuable business partnerships and win over investors — or even customers! When we launched our product and were at our first trade show full of retail managers and buyers, we realized that people only stopped at our booth if we handed them a free sample. So we handed samples to everyone who walked by! In turn, they stopped, listened to our pitch, and 99% of the time they placed an order for their store. In those first few hours, we sold over 100 cases into 100 new stores."
To Let's curator insight, March 7, 6:46 AM

nice content - we at tolet digital agency  apply your concept.

sometime the ideal work to list and associate with property owners across the globe can be quite something. visit our website today and list your properties form any location across the globe as we keep lessons from social psychology at our work place.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 11, 12:34 AM

Reciprocity is one of the famous “Six Principles of Persuasion” defined in Robert B. Cialdini, Ph.D.'s book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. The idea is that we feel pressure to repay others for what they have given us or done for us. We often even give back more than we were initially given to minimize any guilt associated with the initial favor.

Why You Should Start Some Goals In The Middle

From www.fastcompany.com

Traditional goal setting focuses on the beginning and the end—start strong and keep your eye on the prize. Unfortunately, that process doesn’t work for every kind of goal, says Scott Young, author of How to Change a Habit.

 

“A lot has been taught around the classic self-help style of Zig Ziglar or Tony Robbins where you have a clear goal, you visualize it, write it down, and focus on the starting point,” says Young, cofounder of the career development course Top Performer. “Some goals, though, aren’t clearly sequential.”

 

The middle can and should be your starting point when you’re setting a goal where you’re unclear of the level you can achieve within a particular timeframe. This is especially the case with daunting, unfamiliar goals where you don’t yet have a strong sense of the big picture.

The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 6, 4:28 PM

Some goals aren’t clearly sequential. Here’s the case for rethinking your approach.

Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 4:55 PM
From the original scoop: "Traditional goal setting focuses on the beginning and the end—start strong and keep your eye on the prize. Unfortunately, that process doesn’t work for every kind of goal, says Scott Young, author of How to Change a Habit. “A lot has been taught around the classic self-help style of Zig Ziglar or Tony Robbins where you have a clear goal, you visualize it, write it down, and focus on the starting point,” says Young, cofounder of the career development course Top Performer. “Some goals, though, aren’t clearly sequential.” The middle can and should be your starting point when you’re setting a goal where you’re unclear of the level you can achieve within a particular timeframe. This is especially the case with daunting, unfamiliar goals where you don’t yet have a strong sense of the big picture."

Forget Schmoozing, Here’s How To Get Influential People’s Attention

From www.fastcompany.com

You probably know that powerful people receive dozens, if not hundreds, of unsolicited requests every day. And at networking events or speaking engagements, the most influential folks in the room usually have to fight back a scrum of people hoping to get a word in or hand off a business card. To get on their radar, you have to do more than cold email and hope for the best, or push your way to the front of the line at industry mixers.

 

The better way to connect with superstars isn’t to get in front of them and ask them for things. As Duke University professor and author Dorie Clark put it, “The world is competing for the attention of the most successful people,” she wrote for Harvard Business Review. “If you want to meet them–and break through and build a lasting connection–the best strategy is to make them come to you.” Here are a few ways to do that.

The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 13, 5:39 PM

Small talk and cold emailing will only take you so far, but these five tactics can get you noticed—and remembered—for all the right reasons.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 18, 2:10 AM

The better way to connect with superstars isn’t to get in front of them and ask them for things. If you want to meet them–and break through and build a lasting connection–the best strategy is to make them come to you.” Here are a few ways to do that.

8 Easy Workspace Fixes to Improve Productivity, Mood, Creativity, and Health

From www.inc.com

Yesterday I walked into my home office and examined the space from a fresh perspective. It hasn't had a facelift in about ten years and I've hardly noticed its dingy appearance. Don't get me wrong, I love my office but it's simply out of date and no longer reflects my personality. It's time for a change.

 

Approaching the challenge like any diligent, problem-solving coach, I did my research. What does science say about an office space that boosts energy, creativity, and productivity, all while projecting a safe, calm feeling for clients? Yes, it's possible, and you can do it all on your own. Here's what I've learned.

1. Use color, but not just any color.

Color psychology studies (and there are many) reveal changes in the body and brain when people view certain colors. These changes influence productivity, creativity, health, stress levels, focus, communication, and emotions. That's some powerful influence!

 

Color psychologist Angela Wright explains the phenomenon this way: "Color travels to us on wavelengths of photons from the sun. Those are converted into electrical impulses that pass to the part of the brain known as the hypothalamus, which governs our endocrine system and hormones, and much of our activity."

 

First decide what's most important about how color affects you, your employees, and your visitors. In an interview with Chris Bailey, Wright offered this simple breakdown of the effects of color on the mind: "The four psychological primaries are: red, blue, yellow, and green. And they affect the body (red), the mind (blue), the emotions, the ego, and self-confidence (yellow), and the essential balance between the mind, the body, and the emotions (green)." But it's not that simple. Bailey nicely breaks down the process of choosing just the right color in this article.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 12, 1:39 AM

Color psychology studies (and there are many) reveal changes in the body and brain when people view certain colors. These changes influence performance, creativity, health, stress levels, focus, communication, and emotions. That's some powerful influence!

Martin Mekatrig's curator insight, March 13, 11:58 AM
Use Spring cleaning to do more than giving your workspace a good dusting, throwing out piles of no longer relevant printouts and magazines,  and fishing out those chocolate wrappers, forgotten coffee mugs and apple cores.

Why not give it a fresh makeover, a change of color, a little rearranging, update the wall decor.
Fresh surroundings = fresh outlook = fresh ideas = fresh business.

You'll feel better and perform better.

1
Stephen Rose's curator insight, March 15, 11:53 AM
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How To Stay Focused When You Have A Flexible Schedule

From www.fastcompany.com

Ah, autonomy. Isn’t it grand? No defined time when you have to arrive at the office. No guilt over having to leave early for your kid’s recital. And if you’re not feeling well or the roads are bad, no problem–just work from home.

 

But is it ever really that simple? After all, other things become more salient when you’re working from home, like that pile of laundry that needs to get done, or a plethora of mindless daytime TV viewing options. That’s one issue with autonomy–it’s entirely up to you to get your stuff done. You have to set your own deadlines and hold yourself accountable to deliverables, because no one is looking over your shoulder.

 

Perhaps it’s a mixed blessing. According to the National Workplace Flexibility Study, 98% of managers who implement a flexible work schedule see no negative drawbacks. Rather, they see results like better communication, interaction, and productivity. So, it’s not that simple–managing a flexible schedule requires a strong balance of managerial trust and personal accountability.

 

But what does the latter look like? How can you still manage to get stuff done with the boundaries that many of us became accustomed to before we had this kind of autonomy? As it turns out, it’s more than possible–and we’ve got a few tips.

The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 18, 6:02 PM

It can be harder to stay productive when you work your own hours, so it’s up to you to set boundaries that allow you to do your best work.

5 Reasons to Use MicroLearning

MicroLearning is a form of learning that delivers key concepts in as short an amount of time as possible. It is a short, sharp, just-in-time snippet. I like to think of microLearning as 'short enough to watch standing up on the job'. It's when you need a quick tip, brush up on a specific skill or have a moment to learn about new product between customers.

 

What are the 5 advantages of microLearning?

1.   Timely Learning.

The greatest advantage of microLearning is time. Imagine a manager racing through their day. They have a performance management meeting with an employee but have not had the time to read up on the correct procedure to follow. Or a railway engineer arriving at a broken down train and the broken axle is something he hasn't unbolted for 12 months. Neither of them have the time to scroll through three layers on the company's Intranet, find the LMS, log on and watch the 20-minute module. 

 

What they want is to go to their phone, open an App, and BAM! There is the 3-minute microLearning video. It's all about timely learning.

2.   Speed to Market.

One of our clients is a global Japanese car manufacturer. They require an eLearning module for every new model released. They don't have months to plan for product training. They need learning NOW! What companies require is microLearning with rapid development that matches their timeline for product delivery.

3.   Expiry Date

Learning's expiry date is faster than ever. It used to be that a learning program would last a few years before it needs refreshing but with changing products, people and systems, learning is being discarded faster and needs to be produced cheaply, yet with quality. MicroLearning is a cost effective and fast way to develop training content, making it a win/win for the companies and the learners.

4.   Pictures are powerful

Around 70% of millennials visit YouTube monthly. It is a large part of their life so it seems obvious that we should adapt learning to what they are familiar with. When millennials need to learn something, they watch a 2 minute YouTube video.

Research teaches us that if you hear something, after 3 days, you would have only retained 10% of what you learnt. If you then add a picture to that, retention increases to 65% - that's 6 times better! Using video in MicroLearning makes it stick. Our brain links what we hear to a picture and retention is greater.

5.   Mobile

One of our Pharma clients is investing in Asia. The people they are training in Asia have limited access to computers, but they all have smartphones. How do they train them? MicroLearning. They make it engaging, enjoyable, entertaining and most of all mobile compatible. The training is mobile, so that they can watch it standing up on the job, or sitting on the bus or train.

 

MicroLearning is certainly leading the way in creating new and exciting learning content, whilst making the process easier for both the companies and their employees. Send me a message if you'd like to find out more on our microLearning offering and what we can offer.

 

Chris Gaborit is managing director of The Learning Factor, an eLearning company who loves technology linked to learning. Follow him here on Linkedin, on Twitter @droneservicesAU and Instagram @idronefoto

Karine Fabiani-Lugez's curator insight, March 14, 10:11 AM
Le leanring entre dans le quotidien avec le microlearning
Jean-Guy Frenette's curator insight, March 16, 7:46 PM
PDGMan
Jerry Busone's curator insight, March 18, 10:01 AM

That leader channel Im looking to deliver is closer than I think ... Micro learning is a key feature to set up and reinforce your core skills ...make them handy for associates to get to and keep them short... very short.

How To Train Yourself To Take Feedback Well

From www.fastcompany.com

With all the “be your best self now!” hullabaloo, we can get overwhelmed with what we think we should be doing. We can drive ourselves crazy thinking about all the things we could do to make ourselves smarter, stronger, better. Not long ago, I actually found myself surrounded by whiteboards sketching out all of my self-improvement plans for the year, kanban board style.

 

And while goals and growth plans are great, sometimes the best ideas for change come from an awareness outside of ourselves. I know, it sounds weird to hear a leadership coach telling you to look for something outside of yourself. I’m all about tuning into that courageous and all-knowing voice who can tout your fabulousness–it’s good stuff. But let’s get real: Sometimes the only way to get perspective about what needs to change comes from an outside perspective. Yes, believe it or not, there is often a gap between who we desire and think we are presenting to the world, and the way others see us.

 

Turns out that when you ask the people around you–the ones who see you in action every day and are impacted by the choices you make–where you can grow, their ideas might be a little different than your own.

The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 21, 5:56 PM

Receiving feedback is hard. Here are some tips on how you can be better at it.

Thiranya Ravi's curator insight, March 22, 7:41 AM
Every woman likes to support her husband to face his financial status by working at home in her spare time. 
Get some jobs https://goo.gl/vMRkLG here which you can do at your house in your spare time. 
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CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 26, 1:40 AM

The truth is, we can’t always control the feedback we receive; we can only control how we choose to accept and use it. And learning how to use it wisely can be a game changer.

This Is How To Make A Team Brainstorming Session Effective

From www.fastcompany.com

If you want to hold brainstorms that unearth better, more creative ideas, it all starts with the number of people in the room.

 

That’s my first tip for you: Follow the “pizza rule” for brainstorming. If you’re unfamiliar with the “pizza rule,” it’s the idea that if you have more people in a room than you could feed with a pizza, there are too many people in that room to hold a productive meeting.

 

The same rule goes for a brainstorming session: If you’ve got a dozen people sitting around a table, expect a really long list of truly mediocre ideas.

 

So, what else can you do other than bribe a group of two to six people with pizza to unearth good ideas? So glad you asked.

ebohemians's comment, March 21, 5:10 AM
Thanks
Andrea Ross's curator insight, March 27, 6:21 AM

As a High D/I on the DiSC model I've always loved a good brainstorming session. Nice little article to get you thinking and perhaps change things up a little in the boardroom. Also check out Edward De Bono's 6 Thinking Hats book - fast and effective way to problem solve involving brainstorming that you might also like to read. Have a great week ahead. 

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, April 1, 2:33 AM

Squashing bad ideas could lead people to fear speaking up, missing out on good ideas as a result. But if you’re giving every idea equal due regardless of merit, then you get off-track real fast and end up down a bad idea rabbit hole.

5 Highly Effective Negotiation Tactics Anyone Can Use

From www.inc.com

A negotiation isn't a dispute or a confrontation. Great negotiators don't fight. When the bully on the boat in Enter the Dragon asks Bruce Lee to describe his kung fu style, Bruce says, "You can call it 'the art of fighting without fighting.'"

 

That's a great way to think of a negotiation. Negotiating isn't really about competing well -- negotiating is about communicating well. (That's especially true if, for example, you're asking for a raise.)

 

Want to be a better negotiator? Here are some simple tips.

The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 10, 2:31 AM

Want to be a better negotiator? Here are simple tips anyone can use to get more of what they want -- without conflict or confrontation

Why You Should Hire Emotionally Intelligent Employees

From www.inc.com

Perhaps you've heard the saying, "hire hard, manage easy." This implies that having a well thought-out hiring strategy can lead to on-boarding employees that best fit your company culture. This saying certainly holds true in today's age, where having a cohesive culture has become essential for a strong business.

 

Making a good hiring decision starts by creating a highly detailed and specific job description designed to flesh out the best applicants.

The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 10, 2:52 AM

Specific skills and experiences are only part of the hiring puzzle.

Thiranya Ravi's curator insight, April 10, 7:43 AM
Guys, Are you eagerly waiting to make money on your phone? 
Get here top 10 ways to make money https://goo.gl/tZDdX4 from your smartphone. 
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Tom Wojick's curator insight, April 10, 2:54 PM

There isn't a facet or aspect of any business were emotional intelligence isn't a positive contributor and factor in success. The ROI on EQ is well documented.

How To Communicate With People Who Disagree With You

From www.fastcompany.com

We’ve all been there: those times you need to argue your point of view to someone who you know disagrees with you. You immediately go to your keyboard and start to type out that 280-character tweet, the Facebook reply, or a paragraphs-long email. Surely the reason, logic, and sheer power of your written words will convince whoever it is who disagrees with you to see your point of view? But new research suggests these written arguments may not be the best approach.

The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 10, 1:43 AM

Research suggests oral, not written, communication works best.

Yanglish's curator insight, May 14, 10:27 AM
...written arguments may not be the best approach.

How to Keep Networking from Draining You

From hbr.org

Whether it’s attending startup events, social gatherings, or happy hours, networking is a necessary part of every entrepreneur’s life. Seventy-eight percent of entrepreneurs agree that networking is crucial to startup success, which is why there are a myriad of articles online about how to master and love the art of networking.

 

But networking can be extremely draining. Imagine the countless hours entrepreneurs spend talking, traveling, and socializing with contacts and potential investors. Excessive social interaction can be physically and mentally exhausting for anyone — even extroverts. In fact, many of the founders I coach describe networking as draining, saying it sometimes robs them of the energy they need to work on actual business operations.

The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 10, 12:03 AM

You’ll know you’ve hit your optimal level once you’ve found a social schedule that you can sustain in the long term and that leaves you feeling productive and energized at the end of the week, rather than miserable and completely wiped out.

The New Rules of Talent Management

From hbr.org

You could say HR is going “agile lite,” applying the general principles without adopting all the tools and protocols from the tech world. It’s a move away from a rules- and planning-based approach toward a simpler and faster model driven by feedback from participants. This new paradigm has really taken off in the area of performance management. (In a 2017 Deloitte survey, 79% of global executives rated agile performance management as a high organizational priority.) But other HR processes are starting to change too.

In many companies that’s happening gradually, almost organically, as a spillover from IT, where more than 90% of organizations already use agile practices. At the Bank of Montreal (BMO), for example, the shift began as tech employees joined cross-functional product-development teams to make the bank more customer focused. The business side has learned agile principles from IT colleagues, and IT has learned about customer needs from the business. One result is that BMO now thinks about performance management in terms of teams, not just individuals. Elsewhere the move to agile HR has been faster and more deliberate. GE is a prime example. Seen for many years as a paragon of management through control systems, it switched to FastWorks, a lean approach that cuts back on top-down financial controls and empowers teams to manage projects as needs evolve.

The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 17, 9:07 PM

Agile isn’t just for tech anymore—it’s transforming how organizations hire, develop, and manage their people. This package provides a guide to the transition.

3 Things Companies Do to Build an Exceptional Culture

From www.inc.com

Exceptional workplace doesn't happen by accident.  It starts with a clearly defined vision that includes the company's core values, a detailed description of what each of those values means on a day-to-day basis, and a system for measuring  whether or not the people in the organization are living those values.

I refer to this plan as a culture blueprint, and it's critical to the creation and scaling of your company's culture, just as an architect's plans are to the building of a skyscraper. Done correctly, it serves as a North Star to the senior management team as you hire and manage the company's workforce. Without it, you'll end up building something that's likely to collapse under its own weight.  

The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 17, 8:56 PM

Top employers create a blueprint, treat HR like a sales organization and govern by meritocracy.

Ann Zaslow-Rethaber's curator insight, May 18, 1:52 PM

 

Company culture is incredibly important ,and far too many companies fail to invest the time and resources to create a positive one. 

 

Make no mistake ...every single company HAS a culture, regardless of weather you try to create one, or not. 

 

What is yours?

 

 

Asking Yourself This 1 Question Will Instantly Reveal Whether You're a Good Leader

From www.inc.com

Ever worked for a leader who left an imprint on your life? The type that took you under his or her wing, coached and mentored you, removed obstacles from your path, and was always available for you? 

That person may be in the minority in the world of transactional management and carrot-and-stick motivation approaches. But if you've experienced such a leader's unique greatness, you'll never forget how they made you feel. 

  • They didn't get caught up in their positional power or take advantage of their title.
  • They inspired you by making you feel like an equal.
  • They shared some of the decision making with you and stretched your growth.
  • They provided you with all the resources you needed to do your best work.

For those staring at the bullets above like a deer in headlights, let me assure you: They do exist. 

Leaders like these aren't characters in some rose coloured Hollywood script. They are real humans beings that arrived there through hard work, trial and error, and a wholehearted commitment to be and do their best. 

The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 25, 12:10 AM

The answer to the question is what will separate exceptional leaders from mere bosses.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, July 8, 2:11 AM

We tend to forget the impact we have on the people entrusted to our care -- whether they're employees, customers, students, or our own children. They listen, they watch, and they scrutinize our every move and motive. Hence, don't underestimate the impact you have on people. Leadership is an enormous responsibility with, quite literally, livelihoods at stake.