Aboriginal Languages
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Aboriginal Languages
Links to Aboriginal language resources with a particular focus on Noongar language and culture.
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Millennial Aboriginal Australians Have Developed Their Own Language

Millennial Aboriginal Australians Have Developed Their Own Language | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Lajamanu is remote; the nearest town is 600 kilometers (373 miles) away. In the mid-20th century, lives were in flux, and “[people] were also working for no pay, just rations, with no choice of work and very little agency in their lives. Their lives were run by the government, they were not free to travel or live or work where they wanted to,” O’Shannessy says. Having to start fresh outside of the comfort of relatives, these Warlpiri people were doubly isolated, both from city centers and kin. O’Shannessy says that this remoteness played a role. “Now everyone can talk to each other regularly on a cell phone, but it wasn’t like that in the 1950s–1990s.”

The small size of this particular town allowed for the rapid sharing of a new language like Light Warlpiri because it was common for everyone to see each other on a daily basis, “so a new way of speaking could quickly spread through the friendship groups of the children, and stop at the boundary of the community.” The rapid migration of Warlpiri people to Lajamanu was mirrored in the development of this new language. “With all of this forced change in people’s lives, how they used their languages suddenly had to change also. For example, they suddenly had to talk to people whose languages they didn’t know, which is how Kriol developed.”*
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Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity

Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it

RNLD stands alongside Indigenous people who know there is a strong link between their language work and community resilience, health, wellbeing and cultural identity. We support the sustainability of Indigenous Languages and Indigenous peoples’ ownership of their language documentation and revitalisation. We are responsive to community need, and offer training, advocacy, networking, professional development and information sharing. Click the title to visit their website.

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NIMAs celebrate 15 years with massive line-up announcement

NIMAs celebrate 15 years with massive line-up announcement | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it

This year has been a hugely successful one for Indigenous artists with number #1 albums, (including the final album Djarramirri by Dr G), national tours, Eurovision appearances, Hottest 100 placements and those who have played in dozens of festivals across the country.

“The growth in the National Indigenous Music Awards has mirrored the growth of Indigenous music more generally over the last fifteen years,” said NIMA Reference Group Chair Warren H. Williams.

“As our musicians have continued their journey of taking their rightful place at the forefront of Australian music, the awards have been there not just to celebrate their successes, but to be a launching pad for new talent and discovery vehicle for musicians, whether they are from Darwin, Devonport, Derby, Dubbo or the Daintree."

Community Clip of the Year:

Ali Curung NT – Bounce With Me

B-Town Warriors – Thundercloud: Bourke

Condobolin, NSW: The Condo Crew – How Ya Feelin

Githabul Next Generation – Looking Out For Country

Mulli Mulli

Yiyili Mawoolie – Yiyili Kids

 

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Preserving Aboriginal Language With Tyson Mowarin

Preserving Aboriginal Language With Tyson Mowarin | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
When a language dies, a whole swathe of cultural practices and perceptions die too. In Australia, people are using technology to preserve and celebrate aboriginal language and culture, with Tyson Mowarin using modern technology and media educate Australia on the subject.
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David Fernando Gutierrez Hernandez's curator insight, August 1, 10:59 AM
A very interesting article where I understand how fast native languages are dissapearing. However, I didn't know that there is people out there using technology to preserve indigenous languages. In Colombia there are more than 65 indigenous languages and everyday those languages are dying because Colombians don't have an easy way to learn them. Now, this story gave me an idea on how we can learn aboriginal languages through technology. 
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The origins of Pama-Nyungan, Australia's largest family of Aboriginal languages

The origins of Pama-Nyungan, Australia's largest family of Aboriginal languages | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
The approximately 400 languages of Aboriginal Australia can be grouped into 27 different families. To put that diversity in context, Europe has just four language families, Indo-European, Basque, Finno-Ugric and Semitic, with Indo-European encompassing such languages as English, Spanish, Russian and Hindi.

Australia’s largest language family is Pama-Nyungan. Before 1788 it covered 90% of the country and comprised about 300 languages. The territories on which Canberra (Ngunnawal), Perth (Noongar), Sydney (Daruk, Iyora), Brisbane (Turubal) and Melbourne (Woiwurrung) are built were all once owned by speakers of Pama-Nyungan languages.

All the languages from the Torres Strait to Bunbury, from the Pilbara to the Grampians, are descended from a single ancestor language that spread across the continent to all but the Kimberley and the Top End.
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Why there is no 'New Year': The seasonal 'calendars' of Indigenous Australia

Why there is no 'New Year': The seasonal 'calendars' of Indigenous Australia | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Indigenous culture has a different sense of time to the Western 'arrow' of time writes Alice Gaby and Tyson Yunkaporta from Monash University.
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Traditional languages bring Pop to life - National Indigenous Times

Traditional languages bring Pop to life - National Indigenous Times | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it

Aboriginal primary and high school students in New South Wales have worked with custodians and linguists to bring a children’s story to life in five traditional languages that can now be studied in classrooms.

My Weekend with Pop is the State Library of New South Wales’ first foray of this kind into audio storytelling in traditional languages and part of its contribution to the revitalisation of the spoken word in the state.

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Speaking my language: Indigenous deaf sign

Speaking my language: Indigenous deaf sign | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
A University of Melbourne Atlantic Fellow explores the gap between Indigenous sign languages and AUSLAN, that can leave Deaf Aboriginal Australians isolated
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SBS National Languages Competition 2017 winners

SBS National Languages Competition 2017 winners | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Students nationwide, aged 4 to 18 years, entered the SBS National Languages Competition which aims to encourage and celebrate a love of learning languages in Australia. SBS today announced four national winners across four age categories.
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McDonald's customer orders in te reo Maori only for Jershon Tatana to respond in kind

McDonald's customer orders in te reo Maori only for Jershon Tatana to respond in kind | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it

A McDonald's store has become the unlikely platform for Maori language revival after a video of a woman ordering in te reo, and being responded to in kind, went viral.

Hastings McDonald's worker Jershon Tatana, 17, surprised the group of Maori-language enthusiasts when he spoke their language back to them.

The video, taken by language advocate Jeremy Tatere McLeod, has more than 90,000 views.

McLeod had organised a breakfast at McDonald's for te reo speakers in an effort to normalise Maori language. Holding regular social events was one of the goals of the Ngati Kahungunu Iwi Inc symposium.

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IHHP YIYILI

To celebrate the 35 year anniversary of Yiyili Aboriginal Community School, IHHP and senior high school class guided by Paul Cox and Frances Dawson wrote, recorded and sang this incredible Gooniyandi song to celebrate culture, language and the proud history of Gooniyandi people.

Gooniyandi people have been the custodians of this language and country for thousands of years. This song was written for and dedicated to all Gooniyandi people past and present who have paved the way and left a great legacy of a rich language and proud culture which will be treasured and continued to be celebrated by future generations.

Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

I love all the IHHP songs, but this is my absolute favourite of all time. Sung totally in Gooniyandi language by all ages it tells of language loss but inspires to revive. What better way to celebrate NAIDOC Week! Congratulations Frances, Paul, Leon, wider Yiyili community and school and IHHP on this outstanding music video clip and happy anniversary!

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Aboriginal Parents Engagement in Children's Education a ‘Two Way Street’ | PBA

Aboriginal Parents Engagement in Children's Education a ‘Two Way Street’ | PBA | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Teachers and educators need to be aware of, recognise and be respectful of the learning that takes place outside of the schools and in Aboriginal homes and communities and further engage in this learning.”

Bartos said greater understanding and communication would encourage greater engagement from Aboriginal parents with the school system.

“Parental engagement is more than just parent-teacher interviews. It’s about creating a home environment that is open to learning, it’s about engaging in the curriculum and encouraging and praising the kids on their schoolwork,” he said.

“We all know that parents are children’s first teacher… but we are not expecting them to be school teachers. It definitely is a two-way street. It really needs to be a team effort from both teachers and parents.

“We found that given the right supports Aboriginal kids can do extraordinarily well and given the right openings Aboriginal parents are really keen to get involved and contribute.”
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Panekiretanga students learn about Irish language methods

Panekiretanga students learn about Irish language methods | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Around 40 Panekiretanga graduates are traveling around Europe to learn about the state of indigenous languages in several countries. The graduates are members of the academy of Māori language excellence in Hamilton.

It's not often that you see poi and haka performed on the streets of Dublin.

39 graduates from Te Panekiretanga led director by Tīmoti Karetu have come to explore indigenous language methods used in Great Britain.

Te Panekiretanga teacher Paraone Gloyne says, "We're here to see what aspects of their language implementation that we can discuss, with the chance that we may see new aspects that we could use back home."

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Should learning an Indigenous language be compulsory at school? - Hack

Should learning an Indigenous language be compulsory at school? - Hack | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
If we can recognise the Indigenous culture of our country then we're more open to recognising diversity and being accepting of more cultures.
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Jarraggirren - new website supporting learning of Gija language and culture

Jarraggirren - new website supporting learning of Gija language and culture | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it

"This site shares our stories, struggles and successes as we do  everything we can to keep Gija alive and make it strong.

For a long time our Elders have been working with the schools, youth program, art and aged care centres to teach younger people. They use their knowledge of Gija culture, language and healing to improve education, health and wellbeing in their community. We know that teaching on our Country and in our way will grow, heal, protect and nourish our young people and our land.

To help keep Gija teaching and learning happening  into the future, funding is vital."

Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

So many rich resources on this new website. I love the listening section of songs and stories in language and feel privileged to hear. Great to be able to access a Gija dictionary too. Wonderful steps at keeping Gija language strong.

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The Power of Place Names | Embedding Bama Local Languages into the Australian Landscape

Yarrabah is a former Aboriginal mission settlement that is now home to a diversity of First Nations peoples. In the mission days, Bama peoples were punished for practicing their language and culture. To recall the Gunggandji place names, they had to sing them into being. Edgar couldn’t remember the name of the place on command; he needed to sing the songlines to find the name of the place in his memory. To find the Gunggandji place names, we recorded Edgar, Djungan, and their nephews singing songlines with a map in front of them. While the group was singing, Edgar would point out the place on the map.
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Fascinating article about a project in NT but relevant to anyone living in Australia. Give power to language by using the First Nation place names and learn the meaning to gain closer connection the land. Click the title for the full article.

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Breathing new life into languages of the land

Breathing new life into languages of the land | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Language is at the heart of any culture. It is more than just a set of words and rules. It defines the way you dream, think, communicate, understand the world– and your and everyone else's place in it.
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Inspiring! Click the title to access the full article.

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Boy, it’s a big step to make a trip of the tongue

Boy, it’s a big step to make a trip of the tongue | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it

RISING hip-hop star Baker Boy only started rapping a year ago, and has only released two songs. “I’m so pumped that more and more people are learning about Yolgnu Matha and discovering that we still speak out mother tongue just as much as any other person,” Baker Boy [Danzal Baker] told Pulse this week.

“I want the world to know that the First Peoples of Australia speak their language every day.

“Although I’m not the first to rap in language, I’m proud that I’ve brought it to the forefront of mainstream music and that they love every part of it. People from my community are probably more pumped than I am!”

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Cooee! Podcast - Sarah Mortimer: Call of the red dirt. Teaching in Nature in the Aussie bush

Stream Cooee! Podcast - Sarah Mortimer: Call of the red dirt. Teaching in Nature in the Aussie bush by Scott Poynton from desktop or your mobile device
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Sarah Mortimer is Principal of Punmu Aboriginal Community School in the Pilbara, which includes the Kunawarritji campus, 200 kms to the east on the Canning Stock Route.  During this fabulous interview, Sarah talks about 2-way learning, nature pedagogy and importance of learning on Country to maximise engagement. Sarah reminds us to "listen to children", allow projects to develop, while still being guided by the curriculum. Sarah stresses the urgency to bring back the purpose of why community schools were originally established. A big part of that is teaching Martu language and through a Martu way of learning.

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Why more schools need to teach bilingual education to Indigenous children

Why more schools need to teach bilingual education to Indigenous children | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it

Research shows many concepts are best learned in the language that the learner understands. And mastery in first language supports second language learning, success in literacy and academic achievement in both languages.

Increasingly, international and Australian research and policy make strong links between recognition and use of first language and cultural knowledge, and student identity, wellbeing and education outcomes.

Teachers in Warlpiri-English and other bilingual schools, such as Yirrkala school, have long worked to innovatively blend traditional and contemporary knowledge.

The overarching aim of this dual language focus is to provide young people with the skills they will need as bicultural adults in the modern world. This is relevant in sectors such as the arts, land management, interpreting in legal and health settings and education, to name just a few.

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The Last Leader Of The Crocodile Islands

The Last Leader Of The Crocodile Islands | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Laurie Baymarwannga was the 2012 recipient of the Senior Australian of the Year award. At 97 years of age, she is the last fluent speaker of Yan-nhanu language.
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A beautiful and powerful documentary about the importance of language revitalisation and need to keep teaching home languages in schools.

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Why learn a language in Australia today? | this.

Why learn a language in Australia today? | this. | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
It's never too later to learn a new language, providing you with a range of new and developed personal, social, and cultural skills.
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Gooniyandi song keeps language strong

Gooniyandi song keeps language strong | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Yiyili Aboriginal Community School has collaborated with Indigenous Hip Hop Projects (IHHP), to record a song in Gooniyandi, promoting culture, country, language and history.

The song launch titled, Yiyili Mawoolie, coincides with NAIDOC Week celebrations as well as Yiyili Aboriginal Community School's 35 year anniversary.

Gooniyandi people have been the custodians of their language and country for thousands of years, however like most Aboriginal languages, theirs is at risk of being lost.
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Aboriginal languages of Australia

Aboriginal languages of Australia | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Aboriginal people were able to speak up to 5 languages fluently, but now many languages are critically endangered.

Lack of knowledge already have cost lives.

Aboriginal language is yet to be formally included in schools despite students being “hungry” to learn them.
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

What a brilliant website. The Language part is a treasure trove of useful links to sites, quotes and statistics.

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Revisiting a trailblazing Top End bilingual maths program

Revisiting a trailblazing Top End bilingual maths program | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
In the 1970s and 1980s, a north-east Arnhem Land school pioneered the use of Aboriginal culture and language to teach mathematics and other subjects. Where are they now and what future lies ahead for such programs?

Among other things, the Yirrkala program took advantage of the children's informal understanding of kinship relationships in Yolngu culture.

Kinship names are repeated in a particular pattern through the generations. Then, as now, the children learn to link these repeated patterns of relationship in kinship to repeated patterns of numbers in maths.

Using this culturally-relevant introduction to the concept of "recursion", they learn how to count in base 10. The children bundle straws, which represent numbers, into bundles of tens and then using the set of 10 as a base, they repeat the pattern, bundling the 10s into 100s and then 1000s.

As explained by Quantum, they learn to see numbers as something that can be used over and over again in the same way as kinship names are. And when they understand this connection, the concept of numbers becomes easier.

The bilingual maths program does much more than this, including relating Aboriginal understanding of connection with place, to help teach concepts such location and area.

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