A reflective approach to parenting
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A reflective approach to parenting
Sharing ideas on how an adult trainer could support parents in their development
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Digital Survival

Digital Survival | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it
Addressing digital citizenship with the “Digital Citizenship Survival Kit”.  GUEST COLUMN | by Craig Badura It's a simple little prop I use when teaching Digital Citizenship to our pK-12 Aurora Hus...

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Benjamin Carmel's curator insight, November 13, 2013 1:33 PM

This "survival kit" is equally applicable for adult learners. Fun, and funny.

Carey Leahy's curator insight, November 13, 2013 9:57 PM

Worth a try - with a few changes I have in mind.

Marji Gibbs's curator insight, December 18, 2013 7:20 AM

Creative visual props to discuss digital citizenship

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The Parenting Project – Introduction

The Parenting Project – Introduction | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it
Lately we've had a number of writers take on the subject of parenting starting with Latebloomer of Past Tense Present Progressive critiquing Reb Bradley's book Child Care Tips. I wrote about my rejection as a baby Biblical ...
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How Technology Is Changing Your Kid's Education

How Technology Is Changing Your Kid's Education | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it

by Mike Rizkalla, Huff Post

 

Education is undergoing a huge paradigm shift, not just a facelift. Kids choose the experiences they enjoy. They seek knowledge and education in subject areas they choose -- and that's only the start.

 

Parents are supporting and using technology in helping their kids to find remedial assistance -- one on one, one to many, and many to one.


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Brainstorm in Progress: MOOCs and Connectivist Instructional Design | Geoff Cain

Brainstorm in Progress: MOOCs and Connectivist Instructional Design | Geoff Cain | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it

"Based on the principles of connectivism, learning should:
- Provide for a diversity of opinions
- Allow students to create connections between specialized nodes and learning sources
- Foster their capacity to learn (teach metacognitive learning skills)
- Increase their ability see connections between fields, concepts, and ideas
- Teach students to build networks that will allow students to keep current in their field
- Allow students to choose what to learn and how"

 

Comment: Connectivism definitely struck a chord with Geoff Cain and he writes with enthousiasm about cMOOCs and how he sees them work for the kind of (distance) education he is responsible for. Nice, first-hand account of someone's experience with cMOOCs. Although I certainly sympathize with his lofty goals, I am not so sure his high hopes pan out the way he expects, particularly not with distance-ed students who are always pressed for time. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


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The 50 best children's apps for smartphones and tablets

The 50 best children's apps for smartphones and tablets | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it

Just in case you missed this:

 

Adults are starting to trust their kids with their smartphones, but can children trust the grown-ups to download the best apps?


Via Dr. Alison C Kay PGCE
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Parents, Background Knowledge, and the Common Core

Parents, Background Knowledge, and the Common Core | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it

by Ava Arsaga, Parent Cortical Mass

 

Whether parents fully realize it, they are in the business of introducing the world to their kids, and the more kids are introduced to, the more enabled they are to learn. Here’s why.


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Parenting styles and adult learning interventions targeting parents

Parenting styles and adult learning interventions targeting parents | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it

Parenting is certainly a demanding activity and there are many ways to engage is this activity as a parent. Related disciplines try to categorize these different ways through the concept of parenting styles. Parenting styles try to capture common paterns on how parents engage in their parental role.

This categorization can offer a nice starting point for an adult trainer that tries to design a non-foral learning intervention targeting parents. I believe the concept of parenting style is very powerful when an adult trainer for interventions that target to facilitating the development of parent and, through reflection, raise their awarenes on their own personal parenting style, how it can be enhanced and how it can contribute to the realization on certain outcomes that the parent seek to achieve for their children and themselves and for the family as whole.

The concept of parenting styles is also, from my point of view, a very powerful means to promote intergenerational dialogue. Let us first note that being a parent is may be the most significant opportunity for an adult to actually experience his/her own culture, reflect on it, critisize it and contributing to its evolution. In a multicultural environment, as it is the case in many EU countries today, the ability to understand one's own parenting style can promote a fruitful intercultural dialogue, especially when parenting stories are externalized and shared through face-to-face encounters or through digital media like blogs, social networks etc. Being a parent is, above all, to love your children. Sharing this fundamental experience of genuine bonding can help all of us, I believe, to understand that we all share the same needs as humans, alghtough the way we express these needs differ from culture to culture. One could say that a certain culture is esentially a particular way of satisfying the universal human needs.

In this respect, to organize an ALICE-inspired learning intervention for parents, after identifying the target group, could proceed by assembling a space and offering stimulii for parents to externalize their own parenting style. Telling own stories is a good tool I think. Alternatively, special questionnaires could be used to identify in which broad category a specific parent falls. Knowing his/her onw parenting style and how it complies or deviates from the stereotypical learning styles of the own culture as well as of those of other cultures can certainly promote  critical reflection from each parent and the target group as whole. Through this process a parent can enrich or even change his own parenting style and become able to evaluate this change and start yet another cycle of self-development.

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Nektarios Moumoutzis's comment, September 21, 2012 4:22 AM
If you have objections or further ideas on how the concept of parenting styles can contribute to the effective design and implementation of adult learning interventions, please leave a comment.
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Teach Kids To Be Their Own Internet Filters

Teach Kids To Be Their Own Internet Filters | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it
Students live in an information saturated world. The most effective way to keep them safe and using the internet responsibly as a learning tool is to teach them how to be their own filters.

Via Gust MEES
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Say Keng Lee's curator insight, October 7, 2013 3:12 AM

Useful for the adult pros as well, especially the evaluation criteria suggested...

Philip Verghese 'Ariel's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:45 AM

Yes, Gust, let them felter themselves, and ha, let us guide them. Thanks for the share Gust.

Eileen Forsyth's curator insight, January 17, 2014 12:28 PM

SAGE ADVICE on how to teach kids to filter themselves (digitally)

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Little Digits

Little Digits by Cowly Owl is a fun app that uses multi-touch technology to teach pre-schoolers about numbers and counting.


Via Dr. Alison C Kay PGCE
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A Jazzy Day - Music Education App for Kids | The Melody Book

A Jazzy Day - Music Education App for Kids | The Melody Book | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it
A JAZZY DAY - SWINGING WITH THE BIG BAND is a fun and interactive story that will teach your child about jazz music. The book features original illustrations and music.

Via Dr. Alison C Kay PGCE
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The Children's App Manifesto: Supporting High Quality, Affordable Educational Apps

The Children's App Manifesto: Supporting High Quality, Affordable Educational Apps | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it

In case you missed it: The need for a Children's App Manifesto.


Via Dr. Alison C Kay PGCE
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Kids, Teens, Video Games, and When Parents Should Worry

Kids, Teens, Video Games, and When Parents Should Worry | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it

by Dr. Michele Borba, Reality Check

 

Why diminishment of kid empathy should be our biggest concern about media and video games. Ratings, research, solutions, and how to gear up and parent the “Controller Generation”


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The Tiger Mother

The Tiger Mother | A reflective approach to parenting | Scoop.it

The story of a chinese mother offers an occasion of reflection on how parenting is rooted on our culural identity. Seeing parenting experience from this point of view is very important, I think, from several points of view. It could deepen our knowledge on other cultures and understand better our own culture since family is certainly the cornerstone of the society. Externalising and sharing parenting experiences is also important on how we as adults help our children enter our own culture with its values and norms. Finally, I think that such kind of a reflective approach can facilitate bottom-up dialogue between cultures and their harmonization in the era of globalization. This is extremely important from my point of view if we want to see the otherness as a creative, not a destructive, encounter. As the Tiger Mother says: "There are many ways of being a good parent. We all want our kids to grow up happy, strong, and self-reliant. But different cultures have very different ideas about the best way to do that. And we should all be able to learn from each other."

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Nektarios Moumoutzis's comment, September 21, 2012 4:20 AM
If you want to comment on my thoughts on the Tiger Mother story, please leave a comment...