A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Infobase Learning - Login

Infobase Learning - Login | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Rebecca Kathy's insight:

Literary Criticism:

In this article, the writer, G. Wilson Knight, states that "...fairyland interpenetrates the world of human action..." Knight continues with a series of examples all involving imagery and general conflicts between humans and fairies, both with each other and separately. Knight says, "...on Oberon's quarrel with Tatania. Dissension has entered fairyland itself, due to these spirits' desire for human love, just later human beings are caused trouble by their contact with the fairies..." He also sheds light on the the plays constant mention of a dark and fearsome atmosphere along with moon imagery. "The play continually suggests a nightmare terror. It is dark and fearsome. The nights here are 'grim-look'ed' (V.I.171). And yet this atmosphere of gloom and dread is the playground for the purest comedy." He then goes into details with the moonlight imagery thoughout the play. "The play is full of moonlight...Egeus accuses Lysander of singing love verses 'by moonlight' to Hermia (I.I.30); and Theseus images nuns as 'chanting faint hymns to the cold fruitless moon' (I.I.73);  both associating moonlight with music... Oberon tells how he saw Cupid flying 'between the cold moon and the earth'' (II.I.156) and how his arrow was 'quench'd in the chaste beams of the watery moon'(II.I.162). Tatania would have her elves 'fan the moonbeams' from Bottom's 'sleeping eyes' (III.I.176)" Knight overall addresses imagery and the way fairyland and the humans intermix. Knight used a great deal of examples and textual evidence in his article which makes his arguement on how fairyland interpenetrates the world of human actions fairly hard to argue against.

~Kathy

 

Knight, G. Wilson. The Shakespearean Tempest (London: Methuen, 1932, 1960): 142–143, 146 –147. Quoted as "Imagery and Fairyland" in Harold Bloom, ed.Shakespeare's Comedies, Bloom's Major Dramatists. Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishing, 1999. (Updated 2007.) Bloom's Literature. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 4 Jan. 2015 


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A Midsummer Night's Dream - 1935 ...Oberon & Titania - YouTube

A Midsummer Night's Dream 1935 Oberon and Titania
Rebecca Kathy's insight:

This clip is from the 1935 version of A Midsummer Night's Dream.  During this scene, Oberon has come to Titania to take the changeling boy, and make him a servant. However, Titania will not give him the boy because he was her votresses son. This angers Oberon and will lead to the mayhem that occurs in the play, making this scene very important to the story of the play. In this video, Oberon is shown as being very serious and stern, while Titania is very cheerful as she frolics about. The other fairies in this scene are also shown as wearing white like Titania, which can show that she is more connected to them then Oberon is, explaining why they screamed and ran when he came near. Also, the fairies can, at times, appear to be almost transparent, which can be part of the question of whether or not the events that take place are real or just a dream. Lastly, at the end of this scene, all of the fairies leave when Titania tells them to, instead of Oberon. This can be used to show that while he was the King, she still had control on her own. This can be related to the fact that Shakespeare may have used Queen Elizabeth as his inspiration for Titania .

 "A Midsummer Night's Dream - 1935 ...Oberon & Titania." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 04 Jan. 2015.

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Shakespeare's sources | Royal Shakespeare Company | Theatre

Shakespeare's sources | Royal Shakespeare Company | Theatre | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Rebecca Kathy's insight:

Shakespeare drew from many sources when he wrote the play, A Midsummer Night's Dream. In this article, performance history expert, Rebecca Brown, investigates and explains a variety of these sources. As many know, Shakespeare took the character of Theseus from the Knights Tale of The Canterbury Tales and from Greek mythology. However, he also took details of his life from Greek historian Plutarch's Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans. In this tale, Theseus held two noble prisoners captive who both fell in love with the same girl and escaped to the woods where the inevitable quarrels and conflicts ensued. In A Midsummer Night's Dream, two men of different backgrounds fall in love with the same girl, Hermia. Then, when all of the lovers have run into the woods, conflicts and mayhem pursue. Shakespeare found the basic story for this play in Lives of the Noble Grecian and Romans, and he also added the magical element of the fairies and the comical mechanicals to make the play unique. 

Brown, Rebecca. "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Shakespeare's Sources. RSC, n.d. Web. 04 Jan. 2015.

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Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream is An Elizabethan Era Play with a Greek Twist :: essays research papers

Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream is An Elizabethan Era Play with a Greek Twist :: essays research papers | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Category: essays research papers; Title: Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream is An Elizabethan Era Play with a Greek Twist
Rebecca Kathy's insight:

Historical Article:

This article touches upon a couple themes that are concurrent to the Elizabethan Era. The writer connects Greek culture to Shakespeare's themes, but acknowledges that he dominantly reflects Elizabethan time themes. The writer mentions Shakespeare's use of fairies, gender roles and social classes.

FAIRIES: In Elizabethan times fairies were most popularly believed to be human-sized, without wings, and often wore green to match the beauty of nature. When Shakespeare wrote A Midsummer Night's Dream, he included his own creativity to his fairy characters. He did happen to preserve the fairies' general beauty and nature ideals.

WOMEN: Women in this era were treated as what the writer described as second class citizens. There were excessive restrictions and rules revolving around dating, marriage, and respect and obedience for elders and authority.

MALE DOMINATION: The writer of this article also goes into details and examples on Shakespeare's male domination ideas in the play. Women had no say in their lives. Relationships and marriages were arranged and decisions made by the male head of the family were final. One example was Egeus, Theseus and Hermia. Both Egeus and Theseus threaten her with exile to a nunnery or execution by Athenian law if she continues to disobey her father and his decision to have her marry Demitrius.

This article informs the reader on the play by touching upon many aspects and topics of the play and some of Shakespeare's connections between his personal views and Elizabethan times.

~Kathy

 

"Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream is An Elizabethan Era Play with a Greek Twist."123HelpMe.com. 02 Jan 2015

http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=152868

 

 

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Midsummer Night's Dream- Image

Midsummer Night's Dream- Image | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Rebecca Kathy's insight:

This image was painted by Joseph Noel Paton in 1846 depicting his interpretation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream This picture shows the scene in A Midsummer Nights Dream when Oberon, King of the fairies goes to Titania, Queen of the fairies and asks for the changeling boy. In the picture, Titania is standing in front of the boy and protecting him from Oberon. This shows her as being a caring and protecting motherly figure. Also, the photo shows Titania with wings and light glowing around her, which is often used when depicting an angel. On the contrary, Oberon does not have any wings and he is depicted very plain, as any ordinary human would be. This could be used to show how their personalities and beliefs set them apart. Meaning that while Titania is loving and kind, Oberon is selfish and arrogant. In the photo there are also a few fairies around them that are trying to hide. This was also a part of the play, as the other fairies were frightened to be around the two when they fought. This image shows a different interpretation on the magical elements of the play.

Paton, Joseph Noel. "Blessed Be in Midsummer." A Midsummer Night's Dream.The Juggler. n.d. Web. 04 Jan. 2015. 

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