A Midsummer Night's Dream - By: Andrew Stevens, Alex Bourque, and Nolan Parent
52 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nolan Parent
Scoop.it!

A Depiction of Titania and Nick Bottom - Image

A Depiction of Titania and Nick Bottom - Image | A Midsummer Night's Dream - By: Andrew Stevens, Alex Bourque, and Nolan Parent | Scoop.it
Titania and Nick Bottom,”A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, by Sir Edwin Landseer, 1848-1851
Nolan Parent's insight:

IMAGE: We chose this image from A Midsummer Night's because we thought it was a very interesting and unique scene from the play. Just as it was a weird scene in the play, it seems like a weird scene in the image. From the way Peaseblossom, Cobweb, Mote, and Mustardseed are just watching Titania and Bottom to Titania falling in love with him, this is a very odd scene nonetheless. There is no doubt that Shakespeare was trying to be creatively weird and maybe even funny when writing this scene. This image, however, perfectly depicts the creepiness of the scene not just with the characters and their positions but also with the darkness of the night.

 

Works Cited: 

Landseer, Edwin, Sir. "Sir+Edwin+Landseer++Scene+from+A+Midsummer+Nights+Dream+Titania+and+Bottom+1848-18511 - JANE STREET CLAYWORKS." JANE STREET CLAYWORKS. 19 June 2012. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

 

URL: 

http://janestreetclayworks.com/?attachment_id=15487

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nolan Parent
Scoop.it!

Literary Contexts In A Midsummer Night's Dream - Literary Criticism

Literary Contexts In A Midsummer Night's Dream - Literary Criticism | A Midsummer Night's Dream - By: Andrew Stevens, Alex Bourque, and Nolan Parent | Scoop.it
Nolan Parent's insight:

LITERARY CRITICISM: This literary criticism is by Calum A. Kerr in which he examines the contexts relating to the story. We chose this as our literary criticism because it delves deep into the contexts that the reader may not know when reading the first like we just had done but also looks at the symbolism in the. In the criticism, Kerr looks at the historical context, societal context, religious context, scientific & technological context, and biographical context all as influences for Shakespeare to write A Midsummer Night's Dream. One context that we found particularly interesting was the fact that in biographical context, "[An] influence in Shakespeare's early life for "A Midsummer Night's Dream" would have been his father, a glover and alderman of Stratford. Both of these roles would have given Shakespeare a lot of interaction with ordinary working men, providing models for the 'rude mechanicals' in the play." This is a very valid argument by Dr. Kerr as William obviously grew up looking upon his father, who served as a perfect example for an ordinary working man, which certainly transitioned to his understanding of the mechanicals in his play A Midsummer Night's Dream. 

 

Works Cited: 

Kerr, Calum A. Literary Contexts in Plays: William Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream". Literary Contexts in Plays: William Shakespeare's 'A Midsummer Night's Dream'. 1, Apr. 2008. Web. 4, Dec. 2014..

 

URL:

 http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=31884453&site=lrc-live

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nolan Parent
Scoop.it!

Theseus's Story - Historical Article

Theseus's Story - Historical Article | A Midsummer Night's Dream - By: Andrew Stevens, Alex Bourque, and Nolan Parent | Scoop.it
Nolan Parent's insight:

HISTORICAL ARTICLE: Theseus is one of the most important characters when it comes to the plot and the various conflicts of the play. Theseus is introduced in the very beginning of the play as the Duke of Athens, and is destined to marry his captive, Hippolyta who is the Queen of the Amazons. Both Hippolyta and Theseus are references to ancient Greek culture and mythology. This article gives a quick, but in-depth look at the character of Theseus and his role in traditional Greek mythology. This aids the reader in developing a better understanding of his position in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream.

 

Works Cited:

"Theseus." Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th Edition (2013): 1. Literary Reference Center. Web. 4 Dec. 2014. 

 

URL:

http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=39035920&site=ehost-live

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nolan Parent
Scoop.it!

Globe On Screen 2014: A Midsummer Night's Dream - YouTube

Nolan Parent's insight:

VIDEO: This short video of the Globe On Screen 2014 performing their absolutely hilarious interpretation of Shakespeare's famous comedy; A Midsummer Night's Dream. This is the scene where Titania wakes up from her sleep after being put under a love spell by Puck. When she wakes up, she sees Bottom and falls deeply in love with him despite the fact that Bottom has been turned into an ass. In this interpretation, it is clear that Titania is madly in love with Bottom and is almost a slave to him due to the fact that her love, while it is an illusion and not true love, is extremely strong for him.

 

Works Cited:

ShakespearesGlobe. “Globe On Screen 2014: A Midsummer Night's Dream” Online video clip. YouTube. YouTube, 7 July 2014. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

 

URL:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGgsJd4_r4k

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nolan Parent
Scoop.it!

Helena In a Midsummer Night's Dream - Source Article

Helena In a Midsummer Night's Dream - Source Article | A Midsummer Night's Dream - By: Andrew Stevens, Alex Bourque, and Nolan Parent | Scoop.it
Nolan Parent's insight:

SOURCE ARTICLE: Helena was best known for her beauty in many different plays and stories. She has also been fought over in A Midsummer Night's Dream by Demetrius and Lysander just like in the Trojan War when she was fought over by both Menelaus and Paris. However, this fighting over Helena is only caused by an illusion of love from a spell cast on the two male lovers by Puck. Originally, no one loved Helena. Lysander was with Hermia and Demetrius dumped Helena for Hermia and gained  Egeus's consent to marry Hermia. The fact that no one loved her was ironic because her character is based off of the mythological Helen of Troy who had two men fight to the death over her. Yet in Shakespeare's interpretation, Helena is completely pathetic. She repeatedly  begs for Demetrius's love and is repeatedly rejected. She will do anything for his love back, but Demetrius just insults her and doesn't treat her nicely.

 

Works Cited

Tobin, J.J.M. "The Irony Of 'Hermia' And 'Helena'." American Notes & Queries 17.10 (1979): 154. Literary Reference Center. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

 

URL: 

http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=7062837&site=ehost-live

more...
No comment yet.