A Midsummer Night's Dream
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A Midsummer Night's Dream - Shakespeare in quarto

A Midsummer Night's Dream - Shakespeare in quarto | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

THis The creation of A Midsummer Night's Dream - Shakespeare's works and plays

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  For Shakespeare's play A Midsummer Night's Dream, he drew upon many outside sources for ideas. He took the ideas for the characters of Theseus and Hypolita from Geoffrey Chaucer's ‘The Knight’s Tale’ from Cantbury Tales. Theseus is also taken from Greek mythology where he is sent to a labyrinth where there is a beast with the head of a bull and the body of a man. This might also influence Bottom's transformation into an ass.  It is also believed that Shakepseare took from Ovid's Metamorphoses where the main character, who likes to dabble with magic is turned into an ass. Bottoms transformation is similar to this because the change is done by the magic of a fairy.

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Image: The blending of illusion and reailty

Image: The blending of illusion and reailty | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Image:

   This image is directly from the 1935 version of A Midsummer Night's Dream. It displays the scene where Hermia and Helena are lost in the woods after both Lysander and Demetrius proclaimed their love for Helena. This image is a perfect display of the blurring of dreams, illusions, and reality through the play. This image shows Helena and Hermia arguing because both Lysander and Demetrius proclaimed their love of Helena because of the love potion that had been put into their eyes by Puck, creating the illusion of true love. Without the potion the illusion of love would never had happened. Also this image shows how the fairy world can interact with the mortal world but yet with the humans remaining clueless of their interference. Puck and Oberon are both only mere feet away from Helena and Hermia, but yet they do not notice them because the blurring or reality and illusion done by Oberon and Puck.

 

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Literary Criticism: A Midsummer Night's Dream

Literary Criticism: A Midsummer Night's Dream | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Miranda Zuba Kambry Hansen's insight:

Literary Criticism:

   This criticism of William Shakespeare's work, A Midsummer Nights Dream, exposes a few clever ideas that he had incorporated throughout the play with subtly some times and blatantly at other times. The author, Sandra Fischer  points out that according to the old tradition that on midsummer's night people would dream of who they would eventually marry, and it is through this harmless fantasy that the four young lovers who enter the woods are able to harmlessly experience what it would be like for themselves if they were to love another. This leads to the conclusion that because there are no lasting affects of the nights happenings, it was all a simple dream. The criticism also argues that "A Midsummer Night’s Dream is remarkable for its blending of diverse personages into an eventually unified whole," through the different use of verse between the three social class that are represented in the play. Theseus and Hippolyta are elegant in their usage of blank verse and easily make make classical allusions, this also applies to Tatiana Queen of the Fairy and  King Oberon such as when he is speaking to Puck to make the, "drooping fog black as Acheron"(3.2-357). The four young lovers, who are not as high as the nobility nor low as the guilds men, use rhyming iambic phrases but are not as naturally spoken as Kings and Queens. The guilds men, also as Mechanicals who are commoners, use prose but are constantly stopping and misusing words such as when Peter Quince calls the Pyramus and Thisbe "The most lamentable comedy" when it is actually a tragedy. The use of prose and verse throughout the play, allows for the clear distinction between the social classes of the time period.

 

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William Dieterle Max Rheinhardt Nini Theilade Bronislava Nijinska Felix Mendelssohn Erich Korngold Cagney Rooney de Havilland Powell
Miranda Zuba Kambry Hansen's insight:

During play rehearsal of the actors, Bottom's head is transformed (by Puck) into that of an ass, making him a joke. Clueless that he's been transformed, Puck declares that his friends have run away from him in fear because they're trying to "make an ass" out of him (3.1.16).  As Bottom suffers, Puck finds this humorous which portrays the mischievous character that he is.

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Historical Artical

Historical Artical | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Miranda Zuba Kambry Hansen's insight:

Within this article, Marlowe suggests the ideas behind Shakespeare’s play on marriage within a majority of his play writes.  Embedded in Shakespeare’s earlier sonnets, lies the proposal that marriage is not exclusively a private matter determined by individual feelings. This clarifies Shakespeare's reasoning for having chose to publish play writes such as Romeo and Juliet.  Within Romeo and Juliet, the two cannot just simply contain their feelings for each other and be happy and in an exclusive relationship.  Romeo and Juliet are pressured by the surrounding social environment, (including their families), and many deaths result in this.  Arranged marriages are another central area for conflict to arise within a Shakespearian play write.  There is a theme of paternal authority amongst many plays, such as A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream.  There seems a reoccurring conflict between the father's preference for his daughter and a character who comes along that goes against his current desire.  Marlowe writes, “In Dream, the authority of Egeus to determine his daughter, Hermia’s spouse is overruled by Theseus […]” (Marlowe 290).  This quick explanation can aide in the understanding of what is happening between Egeus and Theseus.  This also supports Shakespeare’s earliest claims about marriage not only being based on an individual’s feelings, but also the surrounding environment. 

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