A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Shakespeare's History

Shakespeare's History | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

Shakespeare's History

 

Ellis, Robert P. "Shakespeare’S Wife." Magill’S Literary Annual 2009 (2009): 1-3. Literary Reference Center. Web. 19 Nov. 2014.

Jace Cornell's insight:

Greer uses available facts pertaining to other young women of that time and place as well as what Shakespeare himself and writers of his time said. No Shakespearean letters are known to exist, and most of what Shakespeare wrote on the facts of life and on modes of thought of his era to issue or spread out from the several hundred characters in his plays and poems. Many men spent years away from their wives earning their living, which is what William was doing for most of their time from 1592 until 1610. No Shakespearean scholar, Greer points out, has suggested that William missed his wife and children, but perhaps he did.

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A Midsummer Night's Dream Act 1 Scene 2 HD - YouTube

Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream produced by Bard in the Park, Toronto, 2010

 

"A Midsummer Night's Dream Act 1 Scene 2 HD." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2014.

Jace Cornell's insight:

In this video it shows how the mechanicals are unintelligent. It shows how Bottom wants to play all the parts and how he is very arrogant and cocky. In, Act I Scene II, Bottom is performing his speech, he requests for another one of the performing mechanicals, to act like a foot rest. When he steps on him, the mechanical on the floor, yelps in pain. This shows how foolish the mechanicals actually are. These mechanicals are the ones responsible to perform an entertaining play for the Duke of Athens, Theseus.

 

(0:00 - 2:11)

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A Midsummer Night's Dream: Literary Criticism

A Midsummer Night's Dream: Literary Criticism | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

A Midsummer Night's Dream Literary Criticism.

 

Fischer, Sandra K. "A Midsummer Night’S Dream." Masterplots, Fourth Edition (2010): 1-3. Literary Reference Center. Web. 18 Nov. 2014.

Jace Cornell's insight:

Sandra K. Fischer gives her insight on the play. She says how part of the play focuses on young love, and overcoming obstacles. Shakespeare adds comic structure by interweaving a play performed by The Mechanical's, who are foolish performers striving to impress and entertain their ruler, Theseus. A Midsummer Night's Dream explores the inconstant change of love with the characters of Hermia, Lysander, Helena, and Demetrius. Lunacy dominates much of the plays action. The moon is portrayed a lot throughout this play and is the most important form of imagery.

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Shakespeare Source

Shakespeare Source | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

"A Midsummer Night's Dream." Shakespeare's Sources. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2014.

Jace Cornell's insight:

John Lyly's Gallathea, printed in 1592 has two girls disguise themselves as boys only for each to fall in love with one another. Shakespeare demonstrates this in A Midsummer Night's Dream. A beautiful girl falls in love with the donkey. The wearing of animal masks had long been part of the folk traditions surrounding the celebration of country festivals in Britain. This play was written 3 years before Shakespeare's brilliant script of A Midsummer Night's Dream.

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A Midsummer Night's Dream Painting

A Midsummer Night's Dream Painting | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
View A Midsummer Night's Dream by Robert Fowler. Find out more and explore similar paintings in the UK national art collection.

 

BBC News. BBC, n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2014.

Jace Cornell's insight:

All of the characters are brought to life in the middle of the woods, underneath the shining moonlight of the night. The whole plays theme and imagery are brought together in this one painting. The word moon has been used throughout to play to come down to the understanding that the moonlight brings lunacy to Athens. In the painting you can see Bottom resembled as a donkey. As well as Titania shown beside him. You can clearly visualize the plays characters from the very first scenes.

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