A Long Way Gone: Child Soldiers
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A Long Way Gone: Child Soldiers
I will provide links to background information on the novel, A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah and links to information about child soldiers.
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Taliban

Taliban | A Long Way Gone: Child Soldiers | Scoop.it
Taliban soldiers with guns near their camp.
Diane Sherry Mankowski's insight:
The meaning behind this photo is breathtakingly sad. These boys are representing all of the children that see abuse in their homes and experience it firsthand. In A Thousand Splendid Suns, there are two children in the home- Aziza and Zalmai. Aziza is not Rasheed’s child so the toll on her upbringing is much different than that of her half brother. Aziza was a toddler when Rasheed punished Laila and Mariam. He locked Laila and Aziza in a room for days without light, food, or water (Hosseini 268-272). The little girl almost dies of dehydration. The physical toll on her body would eventually fade but the emotional toll of remembering snippets of these memories would affect her forever. Aziza and Zalmai both witness the beatings that Rasheed unleashes on Mariam and Laila. When Laila taunted Rasheed over being fired from a restaurant, Rasheed attacked her and began beating her in front of the children. Hosseini describes the scene by saying “Aziza was shrieking, pulling at his shirt; Zalmai was screaming too, trying to get him off his mother. Rasheed shoved the children aside, pushed Laila to the ground, and began kicking her” (305). The children are seeing the abuse first-hand. They are watching as their father beats their mother to a pulp. They “see the violence” as one of the little boy's chest says. And, knowing anything about psychology or the effect of what children see and how that impacts them in their latter years, I would say that the emotional and mental scarring will last well into their adult years. Then, there is Zalmai. He hero-worships Rasheed. Hosseini says “Zalmai worshipped his father, and, because he did, her transformed when his father was around to dote on him… In his father’s presence, he was easily offended. He held grudges. He persisted in mischief in spite of Laila’s scolding, which he never did when Rasheed was away” (295). Zalmai is a perfect example of the effects that abuse from the hands of his father onto his mother can have on a young boy. At times, one can see a darker side to Zalmai, like when he told on his mother when Tariq came to visit (334). Rasheed’s abuse may have created another abuser. This perfectly proves that the cycle of violence is ,virtually, never ending. When a young boy sees these acts, he thinks that that is the way a relationship between a man and his wife is supposed to be like and he may become an abuser himself.T
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The Hidden Ebola Outbreak in Sierra Leone | FRONTLINE

Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW New York Times reporter, Sheri Fink recounts her discovery that Sierra Leone's outbreak started much earlie
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Cutting for Stone

Cutting for Stone | A Long Way Gone: Child Soldiers | Scoop.it
Cutting for Stone has 244,555 ratings and 21,771 reviews. Jason said: The world turns on our every action, and our every omission, whether we know it o
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I really enjoyed learning about the Aghani landscape and culture.  This boko has the same themes of brotherly love, but it takes place in Ethiopia.  I'm curiuos about Ehtiopian medical practices.
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A Long Way Gone

A Long Way Gone | A Long Way Gone: Child Soldiers | Scoop.it
A Long Way Gone has 102,195 ratings and 8,141 reviews. Chris said: I will never. Never. Complain about my childhood again.Okay, that's not true.
Diane Sherry Mankowski's insight:
Masako Tanaka was chosen at the age of five to be the Atotori of the famous Geisha household owned by the Iwasaki family. To be the Atotori means to be the heir of the family Masako was adopted into the household to begin her training of becoming a Atotori she than begin to train for the Maiko and Geiko lifestyle. Once adopted into the Iwasaki household Masako name was changed to Mineko Iwasaki the name she keeps for the rest of her career and life. Mineko begins her official training when turns six years old, She begins to learn the prestigious rules of a Geisha life. Mineko would begin to take all sorts of classes (Dance,Tea Ceremony, Musical Etc.) And be given an “Older sister” Witch in the Geisha lifestyle means an older women most likely a Geiko acts as a mentor to her “Younger Sister”. Mineko first learns to dance and all the rules of that custom how to sit,open the sliding door,how to address your teacher,Also how to speak the Geisha language,(the Geisha language is traditional Japanese language with some different pronunciation). Mineko is taught at one of the most famous dance school in Japan the Inoue school. Mineko began to grow and learn in the Iwasaki family until the day of her debut, before a women can be debut as a Maiko they must have to pass a dance exam,Mineko passed the exam and was now able to become a Maiko. Mineko's maiko life isn't much different from her life before now she participates in what are know as “Ozashiki”, it translates to “banquet” or “dinner party” this is where the Maiko and Geiko do their work entering customers and this is where they make there money. Mineko begins this lifestyle training until she can one day graduate to the Geiko level. Mineko is eventually a Geiko witch throws her life into an even busier lifestyle, Mineko is known as one of the best Geiko of her generation she often treated as a celebrity. But as she continues her career she notices the many problems in the Geisha system that she wished she could change but she is never listened too. In the end it is all too much and Mineko retires at the peak of her career completely flipping the Geisha household and world upside down.
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8B DavidO's curator insight, March 23, 2017 9:34 PM
This article is about a book called “A Long Way Gone”. It is a book about the memories of a child soldier in Africa and how after all that happened to him he lived and was able to tell his story. This helps me understand Africa because it shows the evil and sadness of the war-zone. I think that the topic is that no matter what there is hope in life and all you need to do to see it is to push through the bad in life to get to the good.
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Why I Wrote My Book - Author Interview with Ishmael Beah on his book A Long Way Gone

Former Sierra Leonean child soldier Ishmael Beah discusses why he wrote his memoir, A Long Way Gone. http://us.macmillan.com/alongwaygone
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In Afghanistan, Women Betrayed

In Afghanistan, Women Betrayed | A Long Way Gone: Child Soldiers | Scoop.it
Diane Sherry Mankowski's insight:
In "In Afghanistan, Women Betrayed," Heather Barr tells her readers about a drafted law that reintroduced stoning as a punishment for the “crime” of adultery. The author tells us about her shock and anger at the idea that such a barbaric crime be reinstated. She states “[O]n Monday, the United Nations issued a new report showing that while reported cases of violence against women went up by 28 percent in the last year, prosecutions increased by only 2 percent” (Barr). She is telling her reader that justice is not being served for the female victims. The gap between the number of crimes committed against women and the number of attackers convicted is growing wider. Then, in May of 2013, the Law on the Elimination of Violence Against Women was shut down by a group of parliamentary conservatives who fought for the abolition of a minimum wage for girls and arguing against making rape a crime. Barr tells us that the government even has “ex-Taliban” members. These enforcements are creating such a veil over the everyday-abuses that occur against women. The article tells speaks about how hundreds of women and young girls are imprisoned for running away from domestic violence and forced marriage. To my extreme rage, some are even convicted of ‘immortality’ after testifying against their rapists. These women are told that they committed a cardinal sin- as if they were not forced and violated in the worst ways. The author calls for an increase in the Afghan government to crack down on those abusers and bring them to justice. The system must stop seeing these women and young girls as criminals rather than victims. The author ends by telling the reader how conservatives are attempting to pass laws that prevent women from testifying against their family members. This would mean the women would not be able to prosecute against domestic violence.
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India: Caste Conflict

India: Caste Conflict | A Long Way Gone: Child Soldiers | Scoop.it
Diane Sherry Mankowski's insight:
In the article, “India: Caste Conflict”, it describes the powerful grasp the caste system has on the people of India, and how it has shaped its society for thousands of years. The article talks about how people in this system were born into a particular caste and were stuck in it until death. Based on your designated caste your rights, occupation, social status, and the permissible forms of social interaction with others are predetermined based on what you were born into. In addition, the article goes on to mention the four categories of the caste system: The Brahmans (priests and teachers), Kshatriyas (Warriors skilled in martial arts and those educated to be leaders), Vaisyas (the merchant class), and the Shudras (Laborers not entitled to an education, who generally served as servants for the other three classes. There was also fifth category known as the “untouchables” which is the rock bottom of the classes. These people were associated with activities such as removing feces or dead animals, were considered unclean, and denied basic civil rights. It is said that in 1931 approximately u2155 of India’s population was considered the untouchable class, and were greatly discriminated against. When India became independent from Britain in 1947 many hoped for a casteless society. However India’s caste system continued to flourish. And Despite the government’s attempts to abolish the caste system it is still very much prevalent today in India, and its effects on the people are lasting.
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Geisha Women During a Fan Dance

Geisha Women During a Fan Dance | A Long Way Gone: Child Soldiers | Scoop.it
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Clothing of Early Asian Cultures

Clothing of Early Asian Cultures | A Long Way Gone: Child Soldiers | Scoop.it
Diane Sherry Mankowski's insight:
In the article “Clothing of Early Asian Cultures” talks of the Kimono it's origin and it's making. The kimono originates from China and was imported or traded to Japan many high-class Kimono are made out of silk, they can be worn by both women and men. While they can be worn by both women have more elegant patterns and brighter colors while men have more subdued patterns. The Geisha women have been know as the fashion leaders for the Kimono. Thanks to the Geisha many new conventions of feminine fashion have be created, According to Japanese culture the geisha are the caretakers of fashion. The Kimono is the most basic form of dress to Asian cultures, Kimono literally translate to “thing to wear”. The word kimono itself is mostly used in Japan. While the kimono is a basic garment they are still only worn on special occasions, weddings, holidays, festivals and etc. The Kimono is worn by tightly wrapping it around the body from left to right, then it is drawn up and tied with a silk cord under the Obi. The Obi is a waist wrapper it is always worn with the kimono. In Japan today kimono artists are considered a national treasure preserving the ancient technic, their kimonos are considered master pieces much like a painting.
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Ishmael Beah -- Child Soldier

The child soldier, of Sierra Leone, who witnessed and committed war atrocities talks about his new book.
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