African American civil rights
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This picture signaled an end to segregation. Why has so little changed? | US news | The Guardian

This picture signaled an end to segregation. Why has so little changed? | US news | The Guardian | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
Kent College History's insight:

'In 1957, Dorothy Counts endured a taunting mob to integrate a North Carolina school. Sixty-one years later, her work is being undone.'

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Emmett Till's memorial sign was riddled with bullet holes. 35 days after being replaced, it was shot up again

Emmett Till's memorial sign was riddled with bullet holes. 35 days after being replaced, it was shot up again | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
Kent College History's insight:

'A sign memorializing Emmett Till, who was brutally murdered 63 years ago, has been vandalized -- again. It's the third sign to go up at the site outside Glendora, Mississippi, near where the 14-year-old's body was pulled from the Tallahatchie River in 1955. And it was installed just 35 days before it was pierced with bullets.'

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Ruby Bridges Story - YouTube

Kent College History's insight:

Ruby Bridges was six years-old when she became the first African-American child to integrate a white Southern elementary school in November 1960, escorted to class by her mother and U.S. marshals.

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Black Panthers Revisited | Op-Docs | The New York Times - YouTube



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'This short documentary explores what we can learn from the Black Panther party in confronting police violence 50 years later.'
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Unseen photographs of civil rights conflict in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963 | US news | The Guardian

Unseen photographs of civil rights conflict in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963 | US news | The Guardian | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
Kent College History's insight:

'The Observer dispatched photographer Colin Jones to cover [Birmingham, Alabama in 1963] and capture the activism centred around the 16th Street Baptist church. Many of these images, discovered in the Observer’s picture archive, have never before been published.'

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How the NAACP fought lynching  – by using the racists' own pictures against them | US news | The Guardian

How the NAACP fought lynching  – by using the racists' own pictures against them | US news | The Guardian | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
Photographs of the brutal 1916 killing of a black man in Waco, Texas, became a powerful tool in the hands of the civil rights organization
Kent College History's insight:

'The magazine was the Crisis, the monthly publication of the then new NAACP, edited by WEB Du Bois. The images were part of a campaign that appropriated and subverted racist imagery for progressive purposes. They were a revelation, one that cemented the NAACP’s status as a leading civil rights organization and opened Americans’ eyes to horrific hate crimes across the country.'

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A Lynching Memorial Is Opening. The Country Has Never Seen Anything Like It. - The New York Times

A Lynching Memorial Is Opening. The Country Has Never Seen Anything Like It. - The New York Times | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
Kent College History's insight:

'The National Memorial for Peace and Justice, which opens Thursday on a six-acre site overlooking the Alabama state capital, is dedicated to the victims of American white supremacy. And it demands a reckoning with one of the nation’s least recognized atrocities: the lynching of thousands of black people in a decades-long campaign of racist terror.'

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An incomplete history of American protest

An incomplete history of American protest | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
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'An exhibit at the Whitney Museum in New York looks back at moments in US history that inspired mass protest.'
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Malcolm X - interview at UC Berkeley - YouTube

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Malcolm X speaking at UC Berkeley on 11 October 1963. 
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The day nine young students shattered racial segregation in US schools

The day nine young students shattered racial segregation in US schools | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
Sixty years ago, nine teen braved violent protests to attend school after the supreme court outlawed segregation – but racial separation is not over in the US
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'Sixty years ago, nine teen braved violent protests to attend school after the supreme court outlawed segregation – but racial separation is not over in the US by David Smith in Washington.'
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Six decades after the murder of Emmett Till, the cousin who saw him last dies at 74

Six decades after the murder of Emmett Till, the cousin who saw him last dies at 74 | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
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Kent College History's insight:
'On a warm August night in 1955, Simeon Wright woke to the sound of unfamiliar voices. Opening his eyes, he found two white men standing at the foot of his bed, holding a flashlight and gun. They were after Wright’s cousin — 14-year-old Emmett Till — who was still asleep beside him but would soon be kidnapped, brutally murdered and dumped into a river.'
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Your 60-second guide to the transatlantic slave trade

Your 60-second guide to the transatlantic slave trade | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
Q: What was the transatlantic slave trade? A: It was the forced migration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic Ocean to work as slaves in the Americas. This was a brutal form of commerce that treated people as items of property, and was at its height between 1700 and 1850.  Q: Roughly how many people were trafficked?
Kent College History's insight:
'TV drama Roots, a historical saga of how Kunta Kinte was transported to America as a slave, shocked and enthralled viewers in equal measure back in 1977. Now the series has been remade, and is airing on BBC Four. Here, Dr Christer Petley, a senior lecturer in history at the University of Southampton, gives you a 60-second introduction to the transatlantic slave trade and how it was eventually abolished …'
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The Civil-Rights Luminary You’ve Never Heard Of

The Civil-Rights Luminary You’ve Never Heard Of | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
She was an architect of the civil-rights struggle—and the women’s movement. Why haven’t you heard of her?
Kent College History's insight:
'Historical figures aren’t human flotsam, swirling into public awareness at random intervals. Instead, they are almost always borne back to us on the current of our own times. In Murray’s case, it’s not simply that her public struggles on behalf of women, minorities, and the working class suddenly seem more relevant than ever. It’s that her private struggles—documented for the first time in all their fullness by Rosenberg—have recently become our public ones.'
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The Black Panthers documentary - YouTube

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'Lords of the Revolution: The Black Panthers Documentary The story of The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense.'

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1950 Blackface Performance: Vernon & Ryan - YouTube

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1950 blackface performance: Glenn Vernon and Edward Ryan apply blackface make-up while on stage, and show us how blacks have been portrayed in minstrel shows ...

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Lecture 14. From Sit-Ins to Civil Rights - YouTube

Kent College History's insight:

'Martin Luther King, Jr. and the civil rights movement have become embodied in each other. But in this lecture, Professor Holloway asks: what of the other activists in the struggle? What of the other organizations involved in the struggle? And what of the history of the struggle before King reluctantly emerged on the scene? By uncovering the histories of the Montgomery bus boycott, the integration of Central High School in Little Rock, the death of Emmett Till, the Greensboro student sit-ins, and the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, one finds differing responses to violence and multiple approaches to attacking racial bias and discrimination. Professor Holloway also draws attention to the gender dynamics of the civil rights movement by considering the inner-workings of the Women's Political Council in Montgomery, Alabama, the original motivating force behind the 1955 bus boycott, and the great importance of respectability to the movement. This lecture reveals that there was no single civil rights movement, that there were many activists working in a variety of different ways and with varying degrees of success, and that King was a complicated figure, both inspiring and stifling activism.'

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Opinion | The North’s Jim Crow - The New York Times

Opinion | The North’s Jim Crow - The New York Times | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
Kent College History's insight:

'The selective enforcement of minor ordinances, as many critics note, performs the same work today that segregation laws did in the past. But it would be inaccurate to call this a new form of Jim Crow. What it is, rather, is a form of Jim Crow that whites in the North have been developing since the early 1900s.'

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Opinion | When Southern Newspapers Justified Lynching - The New York Times

Opinion | When Southern Newspapers Justified Lynching - The New York Times | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
Kent College History's insight:

'The white Southern press played a role in the racial terrorism of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which saw thousands of African-Americans hanged, burned, drowned or beaten to death by white mobs.'

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A look at the riots following MLK's assassination | Al Jazeera


Via Andrew van Zyl
Kent College History's insight:

'Racial segregation in public places in the US legally ended with the Civil Rights Act of 1964. But many African Americans were still forced to live and work in second-class conditions. And the simmering anger led to widespread riots, after Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated in 1968.'

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Martin Luther King, America’s ‘naked, brazen challenger’: by Fintan O’Toole

Martin Luther King, America’s ‘naked, brazen challenger’: by Fintan O’Toole | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
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Kent College History's insight:
'In a highly religious culture, King the preacher and prophet offered a double redemption. To America, he proffered the chance to redeem itself from its original sin of slavery – a vision not of the punishment it probably deserved but of the cleansing it must bring itself to desire. To the descendants of slavery – but also to all people everywhere who have lived with the great insult of inequality – he held out the hope of an even deeper deliverance. He expressed in his words and embodied in his courage the possibility of escaping the tyranny of justified rage. In that, he remains one of history’s great liberators.'
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From Rosa Parks to Martin Luther King: the boycott that inspired the dream

From Rosa Parks to Martin Luther King: the boycott that inspired the dream | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
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'A simple act of defiance more than 60 years ago triggered one of the most celebrated civil rights campaigns in history. John  Kirk examines how the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 launched the career of Martin Luther King, Jr and changed the face of modern America …'
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Black-American Representatives and Senators by Congress, 1870–Present | US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives

Black-American Representatives and Senators by Congress, 1870–Present | US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
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A record of African American representation in Congress from 1870. 
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MonroeWorkToday.org

MonroeWorkToday.org | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
Explore the heroism of Monroe Work, who in 1912 showed us that quietly behind the scenes, you can make a whole nation hear you.
Kent College History's insight:
'In the century after the Civil War, as many as 5000 people of color were murdered by mobs who believed the cause of white supremacy.'
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"I Have A Dream": the speech that America couldn’t ignore

"I Have A Dream": the speech that America couldn’t ignore | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
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'On 28 August 1963 Martin Luther King issued his ‘I Have a Dream’ oration to a quarter of a million civil rights supporters in Washington DC. Robert Cook assesses the impact of this iconic moment on the struggle for racial equality ...'
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Harriet Tubman and the ‘Underground Railroad’

Harriet Tubman and the ‘Underground Railroad’ | African American civil rights | Scoop.it
In the years since Martha Washington briefly graced the one silver dollar-bill in the 19th century, the space on US banknotes has been reserved for white men, usually presidents. However, in April 2016 the country’s treasury announced their intention to depict Harriet Tubman, a runaway slave, on the front of their $20 bill.
Kent College History's insight:
'After her daring escape from slavery in 1849, Harriet Tubman risked her own safety to help guide around 70 friends and family to freedom using a secret network of slaves and abolitionist sympathisers. Later, she became the first woman to lead an armed raid in the American Civil War.'
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