A level Film Studies
287 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Rick Moore from A Level Film Studies
Scoop.it!

Bumper box office and actors on actors – the Dailies film podcast

Bumper box office and actors on actors – the Dailies film podcast | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
Now showing: latest Star Wars and Hunger Games chapters prove that the cinema isn't dead and why actor roundtables can often bring out the best storiesYour daily update of the latest news and reviews from the Guardian film team.

Via JW
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from A Level Film Studies
Scoop.it!

Numbers of the devil: Star Wars and the dark arts of box office analysis

Numbers of the devil: Star Wars and the dark arts of box office analysis | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
How and why did Hollywood turn speculation about blockbusters’ financial performance into a marketing tool – and is the strategy about to backfire?

Via JW
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rick Moore
Scoop.it!

Quentin Tarantino on Chungking Express

quentin tarantino comments on wong kar wais "chungking express". Very interesting for those who have seen the movie or still want to. Chungking Express is ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rick Moore
Scoop.it!

In the Mood for Love 2000 Full Movie

In the Mood for Love is http://bit.ly/1LLTWnX a Hong Kong film directed by Wong Kar-wai, starring Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung.The film takes place in Hong ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rick Moore
Scoop.it!

A Chapter in World Cinema: The never-ending search for ‘home’ in Wong Kar-Wai’s movies | Cafe Dissensus Everyday

A Chapter in World Cinema: The never-ending search for ‘home’ in Wong Kar-Wai’s movies | Cafe Dissensus Everyday | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
By Rituparna Borah Ever so subtly, with a diligent play of colours, facial expressions and moving monologues, Kar-Wai brings home the anguish of homelessness with acute finesse, thereby kindling unwonted emotions even in those of us, who wallow in...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rick Moore
Scoop.it!

Six Things Filmmakers Can Learn From The Movies Of Wong Kar-Wai - Jamuura Blog

Six Things Filmmakers Can Learn From The Movies Of Wong Kar-Wai - Jamuura Blog | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
Six important things filmmakers can learn from the films of Wong Kar Wai, one of the most iconic directors of our times.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rick Moore
Scoop.it!

likely_lad — filmap: In the Mood for Love Kar Wai Wong. 2000...

filmap: “ In the Mood for Love Kar Wai Wong. 2000 Street Khwaeng Bang Rak, Khet Bang Rak, Krung Thep Maha Nakhon 10500, Thailand See in map See in imdb ”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from A2 Film Studies
Scoop.it!

"We lost our way": the time and space of alienation in Wong Kar-wai’s "Happy Together" by Caroline Guo

"We lost our way": the time and space of alienation in Wong Kar-wai’s "Happy Together" by Caroline Guo | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it

“We lost our way,” recounts Lai Yiu-fai (Tony Leung) in his voice-over at the beginning of Wong Kar-wai’s Happy Together (1997). A gust of wind passes through, flipping a road map over in slow motion. The native Hong Kong characters Lai and his soon-to-be-ex-lover Ho Po-wing (Leslie Cheung) find themselves irrevocably lost on the way to the Iguazu Falls from Buenos Aires, Argentina. The film has been notably cited as Wong’s first work involving a homosexual romance and shot entirely outside of Hong Kong. As a result, the film’s political nature, theme of exile, and transnational production processes have been examined in detail by Peter Brunette, Stephen Teo, and in Lisa Odham Stokes and Michael Hoover’s City on Fire.[1]However, the shot that seems to pass by largely unnoticed is the reversal of the map. With its elongated motion, placement in the initial moments of the film, and Lai’s voice pouring through the imagery, a significant break is declared. Indeed, Lai suggests that they are not simply unfamiliar with the foreign land, but also, and perhaps even more so, incapable of mapping themselves onto the surroundings. That is, they experience a disjuncture from Argentina’s space—its geography and sheer expansiveness.


Via JW
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from Tracking Transmedia
Scoop.it!

How The Veronica Mars Kickstarter Campaign Affects Independent Filmmakers by Sheri Candler

CONNECT WITH SHERI CANDLER http://www.shericandler.com http://www.linkedin.com/in/shericandler https://www.facebook.com/SheriCandlerMarketingandPublicity htt...

Via Zan Chandler, siobhan-o-flynn
more...
Zan Chandler's curator insight, March 24, 2013 4:01 PM

Crowdfunding campaigns are not for everybody. And they are certainly not ideal for creators who haven't cultivated an audience already. Tools such as kickstarter and indiegogo can be excellent for leveraging a sizeable and motivated campaign.

 

Sheri asserts that crowdfunding isn't a form of investment because participants aren't expecting a financial return on their investment. While it's not your typical investment situation, participants in crowdfunding campaigns are expecting a return - they are expecting to gain something that wouldn't have happened without their investment. A new film, and new material to engage with. 

Rescooped by Rick Moore from Italy
Scoop.it!

Paolo Sorrentino’s ‘Great Beauty’ Explores Italy’s Decline

Paolo Sorrentino’s ‘Great Beauty’ Explores Italy’s Decline | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
“The Great Beauty,” the new film by Paolo Sorrentino, portrays Italy as a country where the culture is embalmed in elegant decline and inertia seems to overwhelm all forward momentum.

Via Paola Gagliano
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from Beauty
Scoop.it!

Paolo Sorrentino on 'The Great Beauty' and Italian Alienation - New York Times (blog)

Paolo Sorrentino on 'The Great Beauty' and Italian Alienation - New York Times (blog) | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
Paolo Sorrentino on 'The Great Beauty' and Italian Alienation
New York Times (blog)
Though “The Great Beauty” includes a striking scene in which Mr. Servillo's character stands on a cliff looking down at the wrecked cruise ship Costa Concordia, Mr.

Via CaseySos
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from A Level Film Studies
Scoop.it!

Creating a kick-ass social media marketing strategy for your film

Creating a kick-ass social media marketing strategy for your film | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
The internet has had a major impact on the film industry over the last decade. Initially, there was a concern that the internet would threaten the entire film business as online piracy sites saw annual box office ticket sales decline massively and consistently each year since 2002.  Source - www.the-numbers.com/market However, as a whole the film industry today is booming. Overall, gross revenue in the last ten years has doubled with the help of, rather than despite, the internet.

How has the internet helped?

Film studios and film makers have had to adapt to take advantage of the internet and the power of social media. In an interesting twist of fate, what used to be the enemy has transformed itself into the film marketer’s best friend as an inventive way to minimize the overall costs for distribution and marketing.

The Power of Social Media

Films are a social topic which means that social media networks are a fantastic platform for your campaign.

People love to share their opinions on films with their friends so social media platforms are the perfect place to encourage discussion. By creating word-of-mouth marketing on social media you can create a buzz around your film.

Via JW
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from A Level Film Studies
Scoop.it!

Cloud Atlas: A Lesson in Film Marketing And Distribution For Filmmakers

Cloud Atlas: A Lesson in Film Marketing And Distribution For Filmmakers | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
Cloud Atlas, the epic adventure by the Wachowski's was released October 26th to lukewarm reviews and an even more tepid reception at the box office.

Via JW
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from A Level Film Studies
Scoop.it!

Star Wars: The Force Awakens torpedos US advance ticket sales record

Star Wars: The Force Awakens torpedos US advance ticket sales record | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
Record-breaking figure, with just under a month to go until movie hits cinemas, indicates it may surpass Avatar’s all-time box office haul Star Wars: The Force Awakens has smashed all known records for advance ticket sales in the US, racking up...

Via JW
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from northczarman
Scoop.it!

Star Wars: The Force Awakens Drives More Than 2.4 Million Tweets

Ahead of the release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens in theaters on Dec. 18, Wayin, a social display and intelligence company, has determined which parts of the U.S. have the largest Star Wars fan base, as measured by recent activity on Twitter.

According to Wayin, there have been almost 2.4 million tweets about Star Wars in the last week, with 84 percent of those being ‘positive’ in sentiment. These tweets include those using specific hashtags (#StarWars, #TheForceAwakens, #StarWarsTheForceAwakens or #TheForce), and those tweets containing the words ‘Star Wars.’

 

‘Trailer’ was the biggest buzz word about the movie on Twitter last week, with the word ‘trailer’ appearing in over 584,000 of those 2.4 million tweets in the last seven days. The most recent trailer for Star Wars: The Force Awakens debuted on October 19.

 

In the last week, three out of every four users tweeting about Star Wars were male. Of the more than one million male and female authors tweeting about Star Wars in the last week, each author generated 2.1 posts on average.

Overall, Wayin’s data showed the east and south coasts of the U.S. have a larger Star Wars fan base than the west coast.

 

Jordan Slabaugh, vice president at Wayin, told SocialTimes:

The power of social persuasion is relatively new to the film industry, but has had significant effects on marketing campaigns around upcoming films. The Star Wars franchise has seen firsthand the impact social media has on building pre-release hype. During the time period of Star Wars Episode V in 1980, the first Star Wars film released to theaters, there was no social media to help rally fans and drive ticket sales in this way. It is crazy to see how marketing technologies and strategies have evolved over time.

Advances in the movie industry, like the ability to stream movies to your home theater screens, have presented new challenges for film-makers and their marketing teams to fill movie theater seats. Luckily, the introduction of social marketing has come at a very convenient time for movie-makers as they compete with streaming services.

Readers: Have you recently tweeted about Star Wars?

 

Via northczarman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rick Moore
Scoop.it!

As Tears Go By (1988) Ending Scene [HD]

Directorial debut of Wong Kar-Wai: As Tears Go By, highly recommended. This is the ending scene, uploaded for studying purposes. The song at the end is on ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rick Moore
Scoop.it!

In the mood for love, a note on the making, part1of2

Documentary on the making of "In the mood for love" (wong kar wai, 2000). Interviews to wong kar wai, Tony Leung Chiu Wai and Maggie Cheung.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rick Moore
Scoop.it!

Documentary on Black Panthers Is a Must-Watch - Newsweek

Newsweek Documentary on Black Panthers Is a Must-Watch Newsweek Dozens of books have analyzed the Panthers' history, but until Stanley Nelson's revelatory new PBS-funded documentary, The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, no one had...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rick Moore
Scoop.it!

Wong Kar-Wai: 2046 Montage - YouTube

A selection of clips from Wong Kar-Wai's "2046", set to Lali Puna's cover of "Together in Electric Dreams".
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rick Moore
Scoop.it!

Releasing Amy: the inside story of the Winehouse documentary | Media Network ... - The Guardian

Releasing Amy: the inside story of the Winehouse documentary | Media Network ... - The Guardian | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
The film’s distributors on what has become the UK’s fastest-grossing home-grown documentary of all time
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

25 Resources For Teaching With Movies And Film - TeachThought

25 Resources For Teaching With Movies And Film - TeachThought | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
Whether you’re a student looking to get into the film industry or a teacher looking for reference points to help your pupils, you’ll need all the online resources you can find.

To make things a little easier for you, the film section of Tuppence Magazine has put together a list of the 25 best learning resources for film studies available online. It covers everything from film theory and study points to filmmaking, behind the scenes advice and useful inspiration, providing a wide range of options for teachers and students alike.

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from Auger20Jess
Scoop.it!

Cannes 2015: how foreign-language film-makers took over English-language arthouse

Cannes 2015: how foreign-language film-makers took over English-language arthouse | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
In an ever-globalising movie world, the Cannes film festival is cinema’s equivalent of a national park: a sanctuary for the endangered breed of foreign cinema, fortified against the omnivorous depredations of Hollywood. That’s the theory, anyway. But looking at this year’s official selection, an Anglophone virus appears to be on the rampage. Of the 20 films in competition at Cannes, only three are made by native English-speakers: Gus van Sant and Todd Haynes from the US, and Australia’s Justin Kurzel. Yet more than half of them are partially or entirely in the English language. Many of them are by formerly dependable auteurs, crossing over into English for the first time, and many of them feature high-profile American and British actors.

Take Greece’s Yorgos Lanthimos, purveyor of strange, unsettling, parallel-world tales such as Dogtooth and Alps. His latest work, The Lobster, looks of a piece with its predecessors, in that it’s about people being turned into animals if they fail to find a mate. Except Lanthimos filmed it in Dublin, in English, with a cast led by Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz and John C Reilly. It’s a similar story with Matteo Garrone. He won the Cannes Grand Jury prize in 2008 with his mafiosi exposé Gomorrah – as Italian a movie as you could wish for. His latest, The Tale of Tales, looks to be a twisted, grownup fairytale involving mythical beasts and the devouring of internal organs. The cast includes Salma Hayek, Vincent Cassel, Toby Jones and, again, Reilly.

Garrone’s compatriot Paolo Sorrentino has also forsaken Italian. Sorrentino won the best foreign film Oscar in 2014 with The Great Beauty, a gorgeously world-weary survey of Rome infused with the spirit of Fellini and Italian cinema’s golden age. By contrast, his latest, Youth, is led by Michael Caine and Harvey Keitel and was partly filmed in London. It goes on. Norway’s Joachim Trier, Mexico’s Michel Franco and even France’s Guillaume Nicloux are all in Cannes competition this year with English-language films set in the US.

“Each year we refuse an incalculable number of movies made in foreign countries in English,” Cannes director Thierry Frémaux revealingly told the press when questioned about this year’s selection. “Sorrentino and Garrone don’t do that to please the Anglo-Saxon market. They have their stories to tell.” In other words, it could be even worse if Cannes really opened the floodgates.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest
Youth by Paolo Sorrentino. Photograph: PR
This is nothing new, of course. English is less the native tongue of cinema than its universal second language. Hollywood history was largely written by European emigres: FW Murnau, Ernst Lubitsch, Fritz Lang, Billy Wilder, William Wyler, Frank Capra – the list goes on. But when film-makers from France and Italy start to make movies in English, you begin to worry.

Advertisement

In most developed countries, national cinema is supported by the state, a mark of its importance in preserving indigenous culture and language. If those film-makers, nurtured by public funds, start jumping ship into international waters at the first opportunity, something’s not working. As well as recognising and anointing the world’s foremost film-makers, could it be that Cannes and other festivals also position these auteurs for creaming off by Anglophone cinema? In this light, Cannes looks less of a haven for world cinema.

Take Sorrentino. Youth is not the first film he has made in English. Before The Great Beauty, he made This Must Be the Place, in which Sean Penn played a slightly whiny rock star on a trans-American road trip. Like Sorrentino’s three previous films, This Must Be the Place was selected for competition at Cannes. It even won a prize, but it was probably the worst-received film of his career. It just didn’t feel like a Sorrentino film. Perhaps his foreign senses didn’t perceive how irritating and mannered Penn’s Robert Smith impersonation was. Or that the Holocaust/paternal reconciliation plot was rather mushy. Or that the David Byrne cameo felt like a fanboy tribute. Or that the whole thing could have been a good half-hour shorter.

How did This Must Be the Place come about? Via the Cannes film festival, it turns out. Penn was president of the jury that gave Il Divo its prize in 2008. Sorrentino and Penn met on the closing night and were mutually starstruck, it appears. “He [Penn] expressed some really flattering opinions of my film,” Sorrentino explained. “I found this sufficiently remarkable to entertain the fantasy of making a film with him. Unexpectedly, like a true American dream, the fantasy became a reality.”

This Must Be the Place fell into the familiar foreigner’s trap of rediscovering America – the America most filmgoers had already discovered many times before, in American films. It happened to Wong Kar-wai, whose Hong Kong cool deserted him when he made My Blueberry Nights. And Bruno Dumont, whose erotic snorefest Twentynine Palms made one long for a long tracking shot of foggy northern France. Bollywood hitmaker Vidhu Vinod Chopra recently had a go, but his quasi-western Broken Horses was largely ignored on its release last month, despite lavish praise from James Cameron and Alfonso Cuarón. Cuarón, incidentally, was expelled from film school in Mexico for making a student film in English rather than Spanish. Clearly, he knew he was right.

Every time a global film-making hotspot flares up – most recently Mexico, South Korea, Denmark, Brazil – its talents are tempted away from their homelands, but it’s always been a hit-and-miss affair. Often outsiders have a better angle on our culture than we do. As an untested Taiwanese film-maker, Ang Lee seemed like a bizarre choice for Emma Thompson’s Sense and Sensibility but, as he noted at the time: “In some ways I probably know that 19th-century world better than English people today, because I grew up with one foot still in that feudal society.” Chen Kaige, on the other hand, floundered hopelessly with his laughable British erotic thriller Killing Me Softly. Fernando Meirelles struck gold after City of God with The Constant Gardener, but then went on to make clunkers such as Blindness and 360. The Danes doubtlessly have a better ear for the English language, judging by the work of Lars von Trier, Thomas Vinterberg (currently on screen with Far from the Madding Crowd) and Lone Scherfig (An Education). Then again, Scherfig had a deaf spot when it came to Anne Hathaway’s “Yorkshire” accent in One Day, which sank the entire movie.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest
The Lobster, Greek director Yogos Lanthimos’s new film. Photograph: PR
It’s not a question of tempting foreign film-makers away, says veteran producer Jeremy Thomas, “They’re desperate to make films in English,” he says. Thomas has been behind some of the great Anglophone successes of world cinema, such as Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Last Emperor and Nagisa Oshima’s Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence. “Bernardo wanted to film in English, and continued to, because he wanted to work with the actors,” Thomas says. “The English language has very good actors in it, which a single nation doesn’t have, and stars from many of those nations are harder to get.” He’s not surprised at the high English content of this year’s Cannes: “They want to reach a larger audience. They want to say: ‘Is there anybody out there?’ And they want to hear back: ‘Yeah!’” Thomas is currently in discussion with three of the best known foreign-language film-makers in the world about making films in English, he reveals: “But I’m not going to tell you who.”

As it happens, Thomas had a hand in one of this year’s Cannes surprises: he co-produced Garrone’s The Tale Of Tales. In what he confesses is his first ever English interview, Garrone explains that his film is based on the stories of Giambattista Basile, the earliest known collector of European fairytales. “Basile is practically unknown by the world. So I thought to make the movie in English could help to reach the largest possible audience. We shouldn’t forget, in Italy we already read the tales of Basile in translation, because he wrote in 17th-century Neapolitan dialect. But also, something about Basile is Shakespearean in a way, so I thought it could be made in English without losing anything.”

He had an on-set interpreter to make sure the dialogue was “in tune”, he says, but otherwise, it felt no different. “I was afraid at the beginning I wouldn’t be able to hear if they were going out of tune or not, but in the end I don’t think it was a problem. The actors helped me a lot.”

Facebook Twitter Pinterest
Matteo Garrone. Photograph: PR
Garrone doesn’t feel he is betraying Italian cinema. After the international success of Gomorrah, he received countless, potentially lucrative offers to make similar movies in the US, he says. He turned them all down. This time, he’s bringing foreign actors to Italy, rather than deserting his own culture. “The most important thing is the quality of the movie,” says Garrone. “If you make a movie in Italian, it can sell in every part of the world, like Gomorrah did. You can make a movie in English but if it’s no good, you won’t make 20 bucks.”

If Garrone and Sorrentino are betraying Italian cinema in any way, they’re in good company, looking back at compatriots such as Bertolucci, or Michaelangelo Antonioni, whose outsider’s eye gave us two of the greatest films about 1960s London and America, in Blow-Up and Zabriskie Point. Or what about Sergio Leone? Rather than deserting Italian cinema, Leone reinvented American cinema, and spawned a very productive spaghetti western industry at home.

The audience for foreign-language films has been in decline since the 1960s. Whereas the likes of Antonioni or Godard or Truffaut found audiences and respect in their own language (give or take the odd foray into English language for curiosity’s sake), now they make up 5% of UK box office in a good year. But despite the perceived threat of Hollywood, national cinema is actually on the rise in most countries. In other words, non-English countries are watching more of their own movies than they used to. Local industries are recovering and the box-office share of home-produced cinema is increasing.

The national cinema that’s really threatened by these developments, Thomas points out, is Britain’s. We’ve got the opposite problem, he says: English-language film is overpopulated. “The US, Australia, South Africa and all the other English-speaking places, plus all the other foreign directors we’ve been talking about, they all want to make films in English so we’ve got gigantic competition.” The point is underlined by the absence of British films in competition at Cannes this year. For the time being, our own industry punches well above its weight in terms of production and acting talent and scale of industry activity, thankfully. There’s a British element to almost all the English-language films at Cannes this year: The Tale of Tales, Sorrentino’s Youth, Lanthimos’s The Lobster, Justin Kurzel’s Macbeth, Todd Haynes’s Carol. If any of them wins a prize, can we hail it as a victory for British film? It’s a sign that the nationality of films is increasingly difficult to isolate, and therefore could possibly be redundant. If so, we’ve got Cannes to thank.

Via Charles Tiayon, Auger Jessica
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from A2 Film Studies
Scoop.it!

Paolo Sorrentino Off-the-Cuff

Paolo Sorrentino Off-the-Cuff | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
Paolo Sorrentino was in the Criterion office recently to do publicity for his Oscar-nominated film The Great Beauty, and while he was here we thought we’d ask this cinephile a few questions about movies.

Via JW
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rick Moore
Scoop.it!

Power Rangers fan film shows muscle as it deflects rights holders' assault

Power Rangers fan film shows muscle as it deflects rights holders' assault | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
Bloody and profane, it is the latest blockbuster in the increasingly influential world of short films that have started to trigger conflicts with ‘official’ versions
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rick Moore from A Level Film Studies
Scoop.it!

Trading the box office blockbuster halo effect - CNBC

Trading the box office blockbuster halo effect - CNBC | A level Film Studies | Scoop.it
Box office success leads to higher traffic in malls connected to cinemas, which leads to higher rents malls can charge.

Via JW
more...
No comment yet.