A Day with the Incas
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Government News

The rulers of the Inca civilization were members of royal dynasties or families. The emperor was called Inca. No other people really were called Inca, but over time this term came to mean the society in general. The emperors were also called the Sapa Inca. The high priest, governors, and generals were important members of the royal council.

Most members of the royal councils were family members. The emperors almost always married their own sisters. The emperor would choose a successor to the throne from among his many sons. Generally, the oldest first born son would become the next emperor. The emperor also had a council of nobles which served him during his whole reign. He would consult the high priest, who was also a sibling or uncle, for help with his problems. Of course he also talked to the generals to develop war plans. The generals were most likely to be a relative or good friend.

When the Inca armies conquered other ruling cities, they didn't kill the local rulers. Instead they let them rule as long as they followed Inca rules, didn't rebel, paid taxes, and kept the storehouses full.

The tax requirements were high. Women were expected to weave a certain amount of cloth, while men had to mine or serve in the army. Taxes were expected to be paid by commoners. If the commoners didn't have money, they'd pay with service on state projects or make items to sell such as thread or hand-woven cloaks. People could also pay the government by giving a portion of their yearly crop to the collectors for storehouses instead. The rulers of the Inca civilization were members of royal dynasties or families. The emperor was called Inca. No other people really were called Inca, but over time this term came to mean the society in general. The emperors were also called the Sapa Inca. The high priest, governors, and generals were important members of the royal council.

Most members of the royal councils were family members. The emperors almost always married their own sisters. The emperor would choose a successor to the throne from among his many sons. Generally, the oldest first born son would become the next emperor. The emperor also had a council of nobles which served him during his whole reign. He would consult the high priest, who was also a sibling or uncle, for help with his problems. Of course he also talked to the generals to develop war plans. The generals were most likely to be a relative or good friend.

When the Inca armies conquered other ruling cities, they didn't kill the local rulers. Instead they let them rule as long as they followed Inca rules, didn't rebel, paid taxes, and kept the storehouses full.

The tax requirements were high. Women were expected to weave a certain amount of cloth, while men had to mine or serve in the army. Taxes were expected to be paid by commoners. If the commoners didn't have money, they'd pay with service on state projects or make items to sell such as thread or hand-woven cloaks. People could also pay the government by giving a portion of their yearly crop to the collectors for storehouses instead.

Most common people were farmers and had no freedoms. The common people could not run or own business.

The Incas were very smart, /the common people were not generally educated.

/The rulers were members of the royal dynasties..they were the leaders who ruled the country and the common people.

 

www. Incas.mrdonn.org

 

 

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Travel Report

Inca Travel

Welcome to the Incan Empire! While you are here, you will marvel at the vast road system of over 14,000 miles of road, which the Inca built in less than a thousand years! Many of these roads are even paved, and some of the roads required stone walls, to prevent people from falling off the cliff!

 

The Incan Empire that is located in the Andes Mountain Range, is full of deep gorges. The Incan also built three types of bridges to travel across these gorges: suspension, pontoon, and pulley baskets.

 

The roads were not allowed to be used by common people, they were strictly for government use, or with permission only.  The Army needed these road systems so that they reach any point in the Empire quickly to protect from intruders.  The roads were also used for the llama trains to transport food to market, and for messengers on foot.

 

http://incas.mrdonn.org/roads.html

 

The Incan Empire includes many fascinating and exciting cities! While you are visiting, be sure to tour “The City in the Clouds”. Machu Picchu was the most magnificent community the Incas built, its name means “Old Mountain” in Quechua.  Why the Incas built such a complex city remains a mystery, but it is speculated that it was built as analter to worship various natural resources and dieites.

 

Cuzco is the capital city of the Incan Empire. It is where the famed Temple of the Sun is located. It is a beautiful city with palaces and a large city center.

The Incas were excellent architects using primarily stone to construct their cities.

http://incas.mrdonn.org/cuzco.html

 

While visiting the Incan empire, be sure to try some of their local cuisine!

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Religion & Arts

Written by Angela Lee

 

The Incas were called the Children of the Sun. They worshipped Gods of Nature, sun, thunder, moon rainbows, mountaintops, stars, and planets. To avoid problems these gods were worshipped daily. The gods also communicated with the Children of the Sun through dreams, omens, and other signs. They believed in the afterlife and were mummified. Whether poor or rich the Incas were mummified since this was a simple process.  Festivals were also held throughout the year with dancing, food, parades, and sacrifice. Yes you heard right! The Incan people would usually sacrifice animals, but on special occasions they would sacrifice  humans when a new emperor was being crowned or a drought occurred.

 

www.Incas.mrdonn.org

 

Music

 

Listen to an actual song here:

 http://www.andes.org/songs.html

 

Art/Pottery/Cloth

The Incan people worshipped Sun or Inti so metal was used to decorate the temples that would shine like the sun. Vases were sculpted, plates, food, jewelry were a few of the art pieces created by the Incan people.

 

http://www.discover-peru.org/inca-art-forms/

 

 

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François Arnal's comment, April 22, 2013 12:09 PM
pensez à donner une traduction pour votre résumé.
Suzon et Marie - hypokhâgne lycée Fauriel's curator insight, April 22, 2013 2:06 PM

Traduction Maison, indulgence requise ;)

"Les Incas étaient appelés les Enfants du Soleil. Ils vénéraient les puissances de la Nature (le soleil, le tonnerre, les arc-en-ciel lunaires, les cimes de montagnes, les étoiles et les planètes) quotidiennement pour s'attirer leurs bonnes grâces. Les divinités communiquaient aussi avec les Enfants du Soleil à travers les rêves, les prédictions et d'autres augures. Ils croyaient en la vie après la mort et étaient momifiés qu'ils soient pauvres ou riches étant donné que c'était une opération courante. Des festivités étaient organisées tout au long de l'année avec des dances, des banquets, des défilés et des sacrifices. Eh oui vous avez bien lus!" Les Incas pratiquaient le sacrifice d'animaux, mais aussi d'humains lors d'occasions spéciales comme lorsqu'un empereur était couronné ou qu'une disette se produisait.

 

Ecouter une chanson ici.

 

Les Incas vénéraient le Soleil/ Inti aussi le métal était utilisé pour décorer les temples qui brillaient aussi fort que le soleil. Les vases sculptés, les plats, la nourriture et les bijoux n'étaient qu'une petite partie fe l'art inca."

 

 

Pour une fois, un mini-article dont l'intérêt principal réside dans les liens vers une chanson typique et des images d'art inca.

Suzon et Marie - hypokhâgne lycée Fauriel's comment, April 23, 2013 7:00 AM
Traduction faite :)
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Geography

 

The Incan Empire has three main geographic regions: the Andes Mountains, the Amazon Jungle, and the desert that stretches along on the coast of South America.

(See a video about Incan geography at http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/places/find/peru/)

The second highest mountain range in the world runs through Peru. These peaks, called the Andes, are so tall and forbidding that the ancient Inca people thought they were gods. They run from north to south and can be seen from Peru's beaches 50 miles (80 kilometers) to the west. The highest peak, Mount Huascarán, is 22,205 feet (6,768 meters) high.   The Andes produce all sorts of metals such as gold, copper, silver, tin, lead, iron, platinum, and quicksilver. The people who live among the Andes have developed large terraces and irrigation systems, on which they grow crops like potatoes, corn, and coffee.

The name Andes is thought to have come from anti , a Quechuan name for copper. The Andes' are an abundant source of copper. Chile (a country on the southwestern side of the Andes) is known to be the world's largest exporter and producer of copper.  The Andes produce all sorts of metals such as gold, copper, silver, tin, lead, iron, platinum, and quicksilver. The people who live among the Andes have developed large terraces and irrigation systems, on which they grow crops like potatoes, corn, and coffee.

The name Andes is thought to have come from anti , a Quechuan name for copper. The Andes' are an abundant source of copper. Chile (a country on the southwestern side of the Andes) is known to be the world's largest exporter and producer of copper.  The northern Andes are made up of three mountain ranges that spread out to catch and keep the moisture of the northeastern trade winds. This in turn gives a large amount of rainfall to the area.

On the Pacific side of the mountain range, from the Isthmus of Panama to the equator, the Colombian Andes catch the southwardly winds, leading to rainfall almost every day. Argentina's eastern slopes are relatively dry. Chilean slopes of the Andes catch their moisture as drenching heavy weather such as rain or snow.

The world's largest rain forest, the Amazon, covers nearly half of Peru. Called the selva in Spanish, this huge jungle, which also covers half of Brazil, is home to plants and animals that do not live anywhere else on Earth. Some scientists think there may even be Indian tribes there that have never seen the outside world.  The Amazon rainforest is the largest tropical rainforest in the world, covering over five and a half a million square kilometres (1.4 billion acres).Over half of the Amazon rainforest is located in Brazil but it is also located in other South American countries including Peru, Venezuela, Ecuador, Colombia, Guyana, Bolivia, Suriname and French Guiana.10% of the world’s known species live in the Amazon rainforest.20% of the world’s bird species live in the Amazon rainforest.It is home to around 2 and a half million different insect species as well as over 40000 plant species.There are also a number of dangerous species living in the Amazon rainforest such as the cougar, jaguar and anaconda.

 

Along Peru's west coast is a narrow strip of desert 1,555 miles (2,500 kilometers) long. Ancient people, called the Chimú and the Nasca, first inhabited this region thousands of years ago. The coastal desert makes up only about 10 percent of Peru, but it is home to more than half of all Peruvians.

 Have you ever seen a desert turn into a lush green valley bursting with life? This is exactly what happens in the coastal deserts of Peru every year, when oasis-like pockets of vegetation, called lomas, bloom between July and November thanks to the moisture they capture from fog. 

The lomas’ ability to capture fog and turn it into water that plants, animals and people can use is key to the survival of the biodiversity and human populations living in this otherwise arid environment.

But centuries of unmanaged livestock grazing and chopping of trees for firewood have left the lomas depleted, with less vegetation to capture fog the way they once could.

That’s why The Nature Conservancy and its partners are kicking off a three-year project in Atiquipa, Peru, to not only restore these important oases, but also to help local communities find ways to sustainably manage the lomas so they can continue to provide for people and nature year after year.  

http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/places/find/peru/

http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/sciencefacts/earth/amazonrainforest.html

http://incas.mrdonn.org/geography.html

https://sites.google.com/site/ctwincawebquest/resources

http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/southamerica/peru/explore/fog-catchers.xml

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Rebecca!Morgan Geography's curator insight, March 12, 2014 1:33 PM

This short article describes the geography of South America and provides a brief history. It fall under the GEOGRAPHY subject.

-Morgan