A Cultural History of Advertising
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A Cultural History of Advertising
A peek at the past, present and future implications of our consumer culture
Curated by k3hamilton
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The History of Content Marketing [Infographic] - Corporate Storytelling is Not New

The History of Content Marketing [Infographic] - Corporate Storytelling is Not New | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
An infographic detailing the history of content marketing in timeline form.
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Cocaine, for toothache? The outrageous adverts that would never be allowed now

Cocaine, for toothache? The outrageous adverts that would never be allowed now | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
From an ad that claims smoking is healthy to one telling mothers they should give their babies Coca-Cola to their babies, they give a fascinating insight into a time gone by.
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In My Merry Oldsmobile (1932) Explore the relationship between women and men in the 30s

This Fleischer Studios sing-along cartoon contains a surprising amount of immodest imagery. Lovely "Lucille" is menaced by a mustachioed villain/voyeur but t...
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On Every Front: Canadian Women in the Second World War | CBC Archives

On Every Front: Canadian Women in the Second World War | CBC Archives | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Canadian women were not allowed to fight during the Second World War but they did just about everything else. Tens of thousands joined the women's divisions of the Armed Forces. Hundreds of thousands stepped into jobs in wartime industry.
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Powers of Persuasion Poster Art from WWII

Powers of Persuasion Poster Art from WWII | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
This online exhibit features 11 posters and 1 sound file from a more extensive exhibit that was presented in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, from May 1994 to February 1995.
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MZTV Television formal debut at the World of Tomorrow 1939 World Fair in NY

MZTV Television formal debut at  the World of Tomorrow 1939 World Fair in NY | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Television in the United States made its formal debut at the World's Fair in New York City on Sunday April 30, 1939 with the first Presidential address on Television by Franklin D. Roosevelt. The signal was sent by the Telemobile (RCA's mobile Television van) to the Empire State transmitter and rebroadcast. The New York Times reported the broadcast was received in strategic locations and the pictures were clear and steady.Ten days prior to Roosevelt's speech, David Sarnoff, President of the Radio Corporation of America (RCA), made the dedication speech for the opening of the RCA Pavilion at the New York World's Fair. Staging this event prior to the World's Fair opening ceremonies ensured that RCA would capture its share of the newspaper headlines.

The ceremony was televised, and watched by several hundred viewers on TV receivers inside the RCA Pavilion at the fairgrounds, as well as on receivers installed on the 62nd floor of Radio City in Manhattan.

The RCA Pavilion was designed by the renowned U.S. Modernist architectural firm of Skidmore & Owings. When viewed from the air,It was shaped like a radio tube, attracting much attention since aerial views and models of the fair were immensely popular as they showed visitors the scope of the exhibition. The first sight to be seen inside the entrance of the building (see photo above) was the Phantom Teleceiver, now a prized piece of the MZTV Museum Collection. People were amazed by the quality of the television pictures on this unit. The great majority of visitors had never seen television before, and the set's transparent cabinet removed any doubts in viewer's minds that magic or trickery was involved in obtaining the pictures.

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WGBH American Experience . Streamliners: America's Lost Trains | PBS

WGBH American Experience . Streamliners: America's Lost Trains | PBS | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Biography: Industrial Designers and Streamliners...

1930s

"As the country struggled to emerge from its economic slump, Americans were captivated by the streamlined look. "Streamlined trains," wrote one historian, "stimulated public faith in a future fueled by technological innovation." Railroads paved the way for streamlining in the auto industry. Trucks, buses, and of course airplanes followed suit. It wasn't only large machines that were streamlined. Pencil sharpeners, ball-point pens, and kitchen mixers, which had no reason to be aerodynamic, took on the look."

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Alexey Brodovitch - Modernist Design in the 30's comes to America

Alexey Brodovitch - Modernist Design in the 30's comes to America | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"Bodovitch was one of the pioneers to bring modernist ideas to America.*
Design of the early thirties was conservative and lacked of radical experiments. This could be explained by the economic situation after the Wall street crash in 1929. Many companies felt the need to show stability and used trusted methods in their advertisement design....

As expected his work didn't go unnoticed in America. The photographer Ralph Steiner who worked for Harper's Bazaar, recognized the potential of Brodovitch as a designer. He introduced him to Carmel Snow, editor-in-chief of the magazine whom immediately offered him a job....Brodovitch created a harmonious and meaningful whole using avant-garde photography, typography and illustration. After being hired he asked several old friends like Man Ray, Jean Cocteau, Raoul Dufy, Marc Chagall and A.M. Cassandre to work for the magazine. Cassandre created several of the Bazaar covers between 1937 and 1940.
Brodovitch was the first art director to integrate image and text. Most american magazines at that time used text and illustration seperately, dividing them by wide white margins...'

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Advertising Slogans of the 1930s

Advertising Slogans of the 1930s | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
A study of advertising slogans during the Great Depression.
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A Gullible Nation? War of the Worlds Revisited

A Gullible Nation? War of the Worlds Revisited | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Orson Welles' broadcast of War of the Worlds panicked a nation. Let's explore the night in question and find out why.
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Official Liquid-Plumr Double Impact Commercial Looks like Porn film

Liquid-Plumr presents the two sexiest plumbers ever. Introducing new Liquid-Plumr Double Impact Snake + Gel System.

 

I'd like to think we've come a long way, and then this..sure it will get attention, but is it right?

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Back of the Mike 1939 Chevrolet sponsored short on the making of a radio program

From 1939 and produced by The Jam Handy Org for the Chevrolet Motor Co.
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A Cultural History of Advertising: Soap, Sex & Cigarettes

A video introduction to a cultural history of advertising. A college general education elective.
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Luckies go to War- getting rid of the ugly green package with manufactured patriotism

Luckies go to War- getting rid of the ugly green package with manufactured patriotism | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Lucky Strike Green Goes to War carton insert card.

"The 1940's most successful advertising slogan, "Lucky Strike Green Has Gone to War!," was conceived by Mr. Hill while duck hunting on Monkey Island, North Carolina. Several days earlier Richard Boylan, head of purchasing for ATCo, had informed Hill that there was only a three months' supply of green ink available for printing Lucky Strike labels. Chromium, an element which is essential to solid green ink, was a war material in short supply. Boylan told Hill "Just like the soldiers, green ink has gone to war."

The green package had never appealed to women, and  here was a chance to get rid of it...did the green really go to war?  As if!

Did sales go up? You bet! 38%

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WarMuseum.ca - Canadian Wartime Propaganda - Second World War

WarMuseum.ca - Canadian Wartime Propaganda - Second World War | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Canadian Wartime Propaganda - The posters and photographs in this exhibition demonstrate how words and images were used in Canada in the service of war between 1914 and 1945.
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April 1939, Television Begins its first Live Public Broadcasts at the New York Worlds Fair.

April 1939, Television Begins its first Live Public Broadcasts at the New York Worlds Fair. | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

1939 New York Worlds Fair, Television is Introduced... with Miss Television X 4

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one design era > american streamlined design 1930s

one design era > american streamlined design 1930s | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Futuristic and cosmic design of streamlining in the 30s. Great examples here!

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Images from the 1939 New York World's Fair

Images from the 1939 New York World's Fair | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"The 1939-40 New York World's Fair marks a significant moment in American history. As the nation looked backward over the scarred landscape of the Depression and outward to ominous clouds gathering in Europe, the Fair offered a vision of tomorrow that was clean, safe, and brimming with consumer goods. Under the shadow of the gleaming Perisphere and Trylon, the New York World's Fair depicted futuristic technologies such as television and the interstate highway system while displaying the crafts and products of its day."

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Contributors: M. F. Agha Design in 30s and 40s

Dr. Leslie and the Composing Room.
1934 - 1942 An Important time in the Development of American Graphic Design.
An MFA Thesis Project Written and Designed by Erin K Malone.

"M.F. Agha was educated in Kiev and Paris. After working for Vogue in Berlin he was brought to the US in 1929 by publisher Condé Nast. Agha proved himself with Vogue magazine by showing that the art director was an integral part of the editorial process and was soon given the art directorship of Vanity Fair and House and Garden as well. He was a pioneer with the use of sans serif typefaces, duotones, full color photographs and bleed images. Agha led the field in the use of leading photographers of his day. Edward Steichen, Cecil Beaton, Edward Weston, Louise Dahl-Wolfe and many others. He also brought his readers the works of Masters like Matisse, Derain and Picasso years before other American magazines. He left Condé Nast Publications in 1943 (after Nast died) and became a successful freelance consultant. He served as President of the AIGA from 1953-1955 and was awarded the AIGA Gold medal in 1957. His contributions to the field of magazine publishing changed the nature of magazine design and redefined the role of the designer and art director. "Issues:
August-September 1939

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Chiquita Banana The Original Commercial 1940s

Produced by the United Fruit Company in the 40's, this commercial appeared only in movie theaters, and for over 50 years kept us humming its catchy tune. The...
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The Mercury Theatre on the Air

The Mercury Theatre on the Air | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Recordings of The Mercury Theatre on the Air, the 1930's radio show created by Orson Welles.
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