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Simon Pegg: What does coal have to do with hunger? | Oxfam GB

Published on Jun 3, 2015
Coal pollution is the single biggest driver of climate change on the planet.


Via Andrew van Zyl
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Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from Geography resources for South African teachers
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SKYTRUTH: using remote sensing and digital mapping to educate the public and policymakers about the environmental consequences of human activities

SKYTRUTH: using remote sensing and digital mapping to educate the public and policymakers about the environmental consequences of human activities | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

“At SkyTruth, we work hard to make the unseen impacts of pollution and industrial development visible to the public,” the website says. “This often means making maps.”

The SkyTruth team doesn’t have enough eyes or time to sort the images alone—a sobering fact in and of itself, since it means there’s a good amount of fracking sites—so they’re calling on volunteers. Through the crowdsourcing platform CrowdCrafting, SkyTruth is asking people to classify images to add to their database.


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Andrew van Zyl's curator insight, July 9, 2013 7:45 AM

If you want recent satellite images of fracking, oil spills or other environmental disasters then you might want to bookmark Skytruth. Check it out!

Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from GTAV AC:G Y10 - Environmental change and management
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Human activities are changing the face of the earth

Human activities are changing the face of the earth | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, July 6, 2013 7:47 PM

CD - The human-induced environmental changes that challenge sustainability.

Select number 6 for Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

 

Prior to 1975, the forests east of central Bolivia’s Grande (Guapay) River were virtually untouched. By 1990 (left image) roads had been built and settlement had begun. Recent imagery shows that large tracts of forest have been converted to pastures and cropland.

Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from GTAV AC:G Y10 - Environmental change and management
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Using Landsat Imagery to Map Change

Using Landsat Imagery to Map Change | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, July 24, 2013 4:14 AM

CD - The environmental worldviews of people and their implications for environmental management.

Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from GTAV AC:G Y9 - Biomes and food security
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Human activities are changing the face of the earth

Human activities are changing the face of the earth | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, July 5, 2013 7:17 PM

CD - The human alteration of biomes to produce food, industrial materials and fibres, and the environmental effects of these alterations.

Select number 5 for Coastal Malaysia.

 

Large tracts of land in Malaysia, Indonesia, and other tropical countries have been converted to oil palm plantations like the one visible in the more recent image at right. Palm oil is used in a variety of food products, and has been touted as a biofuel. Increased demand for palm oil has led to destruction of large tracts of rain forest, and has raised concerns about pollution from fertilizers and waste from palm mills.

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Human activities are changing the face of the earth

Human activities are changing the face of the earth | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, July 5, 2013 2:08 AM

CD - The human causes and effects of landscape degradation.

Select number 1 for Aral Sea, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan

 

A 1990 Landsat satellite image (left) contrasts with a recent view of this briny, Central Asia lake. Diversion of rivers for cotton irrigation has shrunk its extent by three quarters in the last fifty years. Color variations are due to differences in detection equipment and processing techniques. 

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's comment, September 1, 2013 10:30 PM
Year 8 Unit 1
Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 2016 10:14 PM
Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from Global Warming and Mankind's Folly
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Peak Soil: Civilization is on the Verge of Eating Itself!

Peak Soil: Civilization is on the Verge of Eating Itself! | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

 

The UN projects that global population will grow from today's 7 billion to 9.3 billion by mid-century.

 

A new report says that the world will need to more than double food production over the next 40 years to feed an expanding global population. 

 

Industrial agriculture, the report finds, is a major contributor to climate change ...

 

Soil is a ... rapidly depleting resource.

 

(See link to complete article above)

 


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Lusk Creek Rider's curator insight, June 7, 2013 11:57 AM

 

We are running out of time. Within just 12 years, the report says, conservative estimates suggest that high water usage will afflict all the main food basket regions in North and South America, west and east Africa, central Europe and Russia, as well as the Middle East, south and south-east Asia.

 

When we factor into this picture soil erosion, land degradation, oil prices, bee colony collapse, and population growth, the implications are stark: industrial civilisation is on the verge of eating itself - if we don't change course, this decade will go down in history as the beginning of the global food apocalypse.

 

 

******
What is the ultimate in individual 'Free Will'? Choosing 'Common Sense' over Socially Prescribed Ignorance. "A common thing with the ignorant is to despise what they do not understand." James Leoni, London 1726.

 

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Climate change making Everest climb more dangerous

Climate change making Everest climb more dangerous | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

“If you’ve got ‘summit Everest’ on your bucket list, better get started now,” says Grist.org. “Apa Sherpa (a.k.a. ‘Super Sherpa’), who’s summited Mount Everest 21 times, tells Agence France-Presse that the trip up the mountain is getting increasingly dangerous as climate change sets in. As Himalayan glaciers melt, bare rock – slippery, treacherous, more prone to rockfalls – has replaced snow and ice. Apa Sherpa told AFP: ‘Climbing is becoming more difficult because when you are on a mountain you can wear crampons but it’s very dangerous and very slippery to walk on bare rock with crampons.’ ”


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Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from The Future of Wellness & Healthcare
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What can population health insiders learn from McDonald's, Coca-Cola?

What can population health insiders learn from McDonald's, Coca-Cola? | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it
A panel discussion at ENGAGE looked at using population health data to improve patient engagement and looked at any lessons McDonald's and Coca Cola could offer on peer pressure.

Via Art Jones
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People who live away from cities 'have better concentration' - Digital Spy

People who live away from cities 'have better concentration' - Digital Spy | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it
People who live away from cities 'have better concentration'
Digital Spy
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NASA is funding a 3D food printer, and it'll start with pizza | The Verge

NASA is funding a 3D food printer, and it'll start with pizza | The Verge | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it
NASA is funding research into 3D-printed food. As Quartz reveals, Mechanical engineer Anjan Contractor received a $125000 grant from the agency to build a prototype 3D printer with the aim of...
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Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from GTAV AC:G Y9 - Biomes and food security
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Human activities are changing the face of the earth

Human activities are changing the face of the earth | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, July 5, 2013 7:17 PM

CD - The human alteration of biomes to produce food, industrial materials and fibres, and the environmental effects of these alterations.

Select number 5 for Coastal Malaysia.

 

Large tracts of land in Malaysia, Indonesia, and other tropical countries have been converted to oil palm plantations like the one visible in the more recent image at right. Palm oil is used in a variety of food products, and has been touted as a biofuel. Increased demand for palm oil has led to destruction of large tracts of rain forest, and has raised concerns about pollution from fertilizers and waste from palm mills.

Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from GTAV AC:G Y10 - Environmental change and management
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Human activities are changing the face of the earth

Human activities are changing the face of the earth | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, July 6, 2013 7:43 PM

CD - The human-induced environmental changes that challenge sustainability.

Select number 3 for Columbia Glacier, Alaska.

 

The mouth of this glacier near Prince William Sound has retreated by more than six miles from its 1990 location (purple symbol) to today (red). In both images, floating ice is visible below the glacier. Although a variety of factors can affect glacial dynamics, a warming climate has hastened the retreat of glaciers worldwide.

Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from GTAV AC:G Y8 - Landforms and landscapes
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Human activities are changing the face of the earth

Human activities are changing the face of the earth | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, July 5, 2013 2:08 AM

CD - The human causes and effects of landscape degradation.

Select number 1 for Aral Sea, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan

 

A 1990 Landsat satellite image (left) contrasts with a recent view of this briny, Central Asia lake. Diversion of rivers for cotton irrigation has shrunk its extent by three quarters in the last fifty years. Color variations are due to differences in detection equipment and processing techniques. 

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's comment, September 1, 2013 10:30 PM
Year 8 Unit 1
Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 2016 10:14 PM
Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from GTAV AC:G Y9 - Biomes and food security
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Human activities are changing the face of the earth

Human activities are changing the face of the earth | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, July 5, 2013 7:14 PM

CD - The human alteration of biomes to produce food, industrial materials and fibres, and the environmental effects of these alterations.

Select number 4 for Gulf of Fonseca, Honduras.

 

Estuaries and wetlands in many parts of the world are being heavily altered for aquaculture. In southwestern Honduras, large areas of mangrove swamps have been converted to shrimp farms. The farms can have economic benefits, but at the cost of natural habitat that is important to healthy coastal and marine ecosystems—and to the people who depend on them for a living.

Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from GTAV AC:G Y9 - Biomes and food security
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Human activities are changing the face of the earth

Human activities are changing the face of the earth | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, July 5, 2013 7:19 PM

CD - The human alteration of biomes to produce food, industrial materials and fibres, and the environmental effects of these alterations.

Select number 7 for Isahaya Bay, Japan.

 

An effort to reclaim tidal flats in this area of Japan’s southern island of Kyushu began a year prior to the 1990 image at left. Although a substantial portion of the area behind the seawall (visible as a diagonal gray line) has been fully converted to agriculture, Japanese citizens groups continue to protest the destruction of wetlands and other ecological damage caused by the project.

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Oceans are Acidifying 10 Times Faster Today than 55 million years ago when a Mass Extinction of Marine Species Occurred!

Oceans are Acidifying 10 Times Faster Today than 55 million years ago when a Mass Extinction of Marine Species Occurred! | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

 

Climate change caused by rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is now widely recognized. But the other side of the equation—the massive absorption of CO2 by the ocean—has received far less attention. The planet’s seas quickly absorb 25 to 30 percent of humankind’s CO2 emissions and about 85 percent in the long run, as water and air mix at the ocean’s surface. We have “disposed” of 530 billion tons of the gas in this way, and the rate worldwide is now one million tons per hour, faster than experienced on earth for tens of millions of years. We are acidifying the ocean and fundamentally changing its remarkably delicate geochemical balance.

 


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Lusk Creek Rider's curator insight, May 14, 2013 5:53 PM

 

... according to a new report issued today by Oceana, is that today’s ocean chemistry is already hostile for many creatures fundamental to the marine food web. The world’s oceans – for so long a neat and invisible sink for humanity’s carbon dioxide emissions – are about to extract a price for all that waste.

 

What alarms scientists most is the rate of change: The transformation has happened over 250 years, faster than anything in the historical record. And if emissions remain unchecked, Oceana warned, the oceans in 40 years will be more acidic than anything experienced in the past 20 million years.

 

http://wwwp.dailyclimate.org/tdc-newsroom/acid-test/the-oceans-acid-test

 

Peering into the microscope, Alan Barton thought the baby oysters looked normal, except for one thing: They were dead. It took several years for the Oregon oyster breeder and a team of scientists to find the culprit: a radical change in ocean acidity. The acid levels rose so high that the larvae could not form their protective shells...

 

http://oceanacidification.wordpress.com/2012/10/08/oceans-rising-acidity-a-threat-to-shellfish-and-humans/

 

 

... the vast clouds of shelled creatures in the deep oceans had virtually disappeared. Many scientists now agree that this change was caused by a drastic drop of the ocean’s pH level. The seawater became so corrosive that it ate away at the shells, along with other species with calcium carbonate in their bodies. It took hundreds of thousands of years for the oceans to recover from this crisis...

 

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2010/02/18/205525/ocean-acidification-study-mass-extinction-of-marine-life-nature-geoscience/

 

 

 

Rescooped by Richard MacCallum from Eclectic Technology
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Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers

Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 17, 2013 10:50 PM

What if instead of giving homework to our students we asked them to come up with ideas? This chart provides a variety of alternative ways to look at homework. The post describes this as "Rather than simply a list of alternatives to homework, it instead contextualizes the need for work at home (or, “homework”). It does this by taking typical classroom situations–the introduction of new material, demonstrating a procedure, etc.), and offering alternatives to traditional homework assignments."

Consider asking your students what they would suggest doing instead of homework. What might you be able to add to these suggestions?

 

Nancy Jones's curator insight, June 19, 2013 9:40 AM

Love this! 21st century learning isn't as much about technology as it is thinking .allowing choices and options like this not only allow students choices but the opportunity for deeper thinking.

Laura Jane's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:17 AM

I stole this from Jamie, and couldn't agree more! What a great [and practical] resource to have as we go into the final semester of our internships. This chart is chock full of ideas for creating more authentic and less monotonous homework for students. It focuses on reinforcing, and not memorizing. 

 

These strategies could work for all grade levels, to different extents. This again addresses the quality vs quantity debate. One of my favorite examples is to reinforce a skill that has been taught. It suggests that, instead of asking students to solve 10 word probelms to prove that they know a skill, to have them work in groups to solve, model, and present one deeper thinking word probelm.

 

This allows students to work in harmony to formulate their ideas, and is a more productive approach to learning. Although some cognitive struggle is good, too much leads to frustration and defeat. Allowing students to work together helps them to actively participate in student-centered learning, and they can better understand what they've learned. I will definitely be printing this chart to put in my lesson planning binder.

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WORLDWIDE: Pacific bluefin population down 96.4%

WORLDWIDE: Pacific bluefin population down 96.4% | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it

Scientists have released a new stock assessment for bluefin tuna which shows that the Pacific bluefin population has dropped 96.4% from unfished levels due to decades of overfishing.

 

This news comes just three days after a single Pacific bluefin tuna fetched $1.76 million at a fish auction in Tokyo, Japan.

 

Despite these findings, countries are still fishing for Pacific bluefin tuna in its only known spawning and nursery areas in the western Pacific Ocean. The current management measures in the western Pacific do not limit overall catches and fail to ensure the long-term sustainability of this fishery.

 

Slightly better management exists in the eastern Pacific. At its annual meeting last June, the body responsible for managing Pacific bluefin off the west coast of the Americas, adopted the first catch limits for this species. This conservation measure caused the fishery to close earlier than planned when the limit was exceeded in August. While those actions were encouraging, they are not nearly enough, says Pew.

 

“The Pew Environment Group believes the most responsible course of action is to immediately suspend the fishery until significant steps are taken to reverse this decline,” said Amanda Nickson, who directs global tuna conservation at the Pew Environment Group.

 

“This latest assessment shows just how bad the situation really is for this top predator,” said Ms Nickson. “This highly valuable fish is being exploited at almost every stage of its life cycle, and more than 90% of Pacific bluefin caught are juveniles, taken before they have reproduced. Further, fishing continues on the spawning grounds of this heavily overfished species.”

We call on the major countries fishing this species - Japan, Mexico, South Korea, and the United States - to immediately take necessary conservation and management actions for Pacific bluefin,” said Ms Nickson.

 

Measures include science-based catch limits, and major reductions in the catches of juvenile bluefin by implementing size limits across the Pacific and preventing fishing on bluefin spawning grounds. Robust monitoring and enforcement measures must also be implemented to ensure that the rules are followed, says Pew.

 

World Fishing

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Asteroid the size of a small truck buzzes Earth: NASA - Reuters

Asteroid the size of a small truck buzzes Earth: NASA - Reuters | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it
Asteroid the size of a small truck buzzes Earth: NASA Reuters CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (Reuters) - An asteroid the size of a small truck zoomed past Earth four times closer than the moon on Saturday, the latest in a parade of visiting celestial...
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Woman narrowly avoids being crushed by falling tree - video - Digital Spy

Woman narrowly avoids being crushed by falling tree - video - Digital Spy | How We Damage Earth OR | Scoop.it
Woman narrowly avoids being crushed by falling tree - video
Digital Spy
Select your local Digital Spy: USA Canada UK Ireland Australia New Zealand Remember my choice. Like4k. Follow @digitalspyus2K followers · Follow · StumbleUpon; RSS.
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