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Civil Rights and the 1950s: Crash Course US History #39 - YouTube

You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is ni...
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Unit 8
5. Civil Rights 

Civil Rights protects groups from being discriminated based on, originally, race, sex, religion, and ethnicity. A lack of civil rights based on race was one of the main issues of the 1950's - a time otherwise marked by prosperity and increasing consumerism for white Americans. This extended into job opportunities, living standards, and schools (schools were a big issue in that they were especially dependent on government measures, more directly bringing in the government's role to protect civil rights - seen in Brown v Board of Education). The Brown decision did not lead to immediate changes at all, but was still significant (before Rosa Parks).

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11. AP60X - Equal Protection Clause - YouTube

Advanced Placement Government review in 60 seconds for Xtraordinary results. Workin' it one word at a time. Presented by citizenu.org and the 2 Teachers.
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Unit 8

3. Equal Protection Clause

The Equal Protection Clause is part of the 14th Amendment. Brown v. Board of Education is the most prominent use of this clause. It was used to rule that segregation was unconstitutional. This clause protects individuals from discrimination, deprivation of civil rights. Not only does it protect individuals, it does so on the state level as well as in relation to the federal government. Arguably, this could be considered to be something that weakens federalism.

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Civil Liberties & Bill of Rights - YouTube

Civil Liberties & Bill of Rights
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Unit 8
1. Civil Liberties

Civil liberties are the personal rights and freedoms that a government are unable to violate: law, the constitution, or judicial procedure prevents them from doing so. Civil liberties include private life, free speech, and practicing liberties. The Bill of Rights is meant to defend civil liberties (which replaced states' individual civil liberty clauses). It includes the first 10 amendments which were desired by states upon the creation of the constitution in order to protect certain (not all) freedoms of individuals.

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Supreme Court Site

Supreme Court Site | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it

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Unit 7

2. Supreme Court Website

Video recording of Supreme Court proceedings are prohibited. However, audio recordings of cases are available to the public on this website. Additionally, information concerning opinions, case documents, news, and current cases are available. On the 30th of March, the court agreed to hear the case of KANSAS V. GLEASON which deals with murder. The case looks to answer the question of the jury having to know the true meanings of convicting with evidence that is "beyond a reasonable doubt," especially in the cases of murder.

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Thomas Confirmation Hearings Had Ripple Effect

Today's Supreme Court confirmation process was shaped by what happened at the hearings for Clarence Thomas 20 years ago. The hearings also changed America's political, judicial and cultural landscape.
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Unit 7

4. Supreme Court Scandal/Politics

Justice Thomas' nomination was marked by a sexual harassment scandal. He was very heavily conservative, which was also a source of debate. His race/background was another item of debate for some. Interest groups can lobby to help get a justice appointed, which can have significant effect. They can also utilize campaign contributions and advertisements.

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Supreme%20Court%20Procedure%20_%20Cases.pdf

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Unit 7

6. 4/14 Activity

The supreme court's jurisdiction includes constitutionality, treaties, ambassadors, controversies between states, controversies between citizens, and controversies between states/citizens and the federal government. The court can take on cases through appeals, which constitute most of the cases, and appellate jurisdiction. Appellate Jurisdiction refers to the court's ability to review, revise, and overturn. When selecting a case to take on, the case must include proper paperwork and a "writ of certiorari" (request for more information from lower courts), Four of the nine justices must agree on a case before they are to review it. The court must hear both sides of a case when beginning, including an "amicus" brief - this is a way to get information from a party pertaining to the case that has not been directly influenced. After a case is decided, through discussion and voting, the majority opinion and the minority opinion are released to the press for public review.

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Executive Command | iCivics

Executive Command | iCivics | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it
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Unit 6

9. iCivics

The game shows that the President has to have a balancing act to get anything done. Being too strong in one direction has drawbacks. Being neutral is sometimes the only way to get things done, however being too neutral is viewed as bad as well. Additionally, there' is always another bill to approve or veto. The upside is that, through executive orders, he can still keep some power over the agencies that enforce laws.

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Chris Gardner's comment, April 3, 2015 10:39 AM
Unit 6 scoop.it grade 100%. All ten scoops completed with insight. Good analysis of your scooped content.
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U.S. Department of the Treasury

U.S. Department of the Treasury | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it
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Unit 6

7. US Treasury

Jacob J. Lew is the current secretary. The department focuses on monetary/economic issues. They are involved in monetary and fiscal policy. Recently, Lew has been speaking with representatives from China on economic relations.  Lew would like to further relations with China, especially in a time of increasing consumer spending (further dependence).

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The White House

The White House | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it
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Unit 6

5. White House Research

The President started off the day with a Daily Briefing per usual. He then traveled to Louisville Kentucky, where he had a press conference. He then traveled to Utah (his plans for tomorrow have no public schedule). Today he mainly filled his role as Chief of State. This is because he acted as a figurehead/representative for public events.

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Limits on Presidents Acting Alone

Limits on Presidents Acting Alone | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it
How a handful of presidential actions have been challenged in court, by Congress and by later presidents.
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Unit 6

3. Research on Executive Orders

Obama was able to delay the time allotted for insurance providers to update their records. Republicans in Congress filed a lawsuit. Getting away with executive orders often worsens a politician's popularity with the opposing party. Harry Truman faced a similar problem when he tried to use government power to continue the operation of steel mills facing worker shortages due to strikes. In most cases, executive orders (unless in a time of crisis) seem to face significant opposition as they greatly strengthen presidential/executive power. This is especially true when an executive order pertains to something more financial in nature.

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Article II for Dummies: The Executive Branch Explained - YouTube

Hip Hughes History lays down the tracks for the train of learning. So jump aboard and learn the essentials of Executive Power through Article II of the US Co...
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Unit 6

1. Article II outlines guidelines for electing the president via the electoral college. Congress is able to determine electors and decide where and when they can vote. If no one wins majority, the House is able to elect the president. The voting system is based off of indirect democracy. Super-majorities, required for things like impeachment, require 2/3 majority rather than just majority.

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The crazy shape of politics: gerrymandered districts - YouTube

The GOP scored 33 more seats in the House this election even though Democrats earned a million more votes in House races. Professor Jeremy Mayer says gerryma...
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Unit 5

9. Gerrymandering

Gerrymandering involves drawing irregular shapes when making congressional districts. This is done to give a significant advantage in voting (giving more power to a specific group). The GOP in 2012 got more seats in the house though Democrats got a million more votes. This means that the districts were made to undermine the power of many votes in favor of certain candidates. As the video put it, it's "the representatives choosing their voters" rather than "the voters choosing their representatives."

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111th Congress Earmarks | OpenSecrets

111th Congress Earmarks | OpenSecrets | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it
OpenSecrets.org has fundraising profiles for all 535 members of Congress (and more).
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Unit 5

7. Congressional Earmarks

Congressional Earmarks are funds that Congress supplies for projects that stop the Executive Branch from having as much influence on the distribution of funding (as opposed to the district/state level). This allows legislators to keep money in their districts. Jack Kingston's (GA) earmarks primarily pertain to military/defense. Unsurprisingly, his campaign contributions also came from interest groups concerned about defense.

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Chris Gardner's comment, March 20, 2015 10:27 AM
good research!
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The First Amendment for Dummies: The Basics of the 1st Amendment Explained - YouTube

Continuing the Constitution for Dummies Series with the Bill of Rights and Amendment One. Explained simply so you can understand the Constitution of the Unit...
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Unit 8

4. 1st Amendment

The first amendment prevents progress from establishing a religion, interfering with the free exercise of religion, and infringement of the freedom of speech. As early as the 1920's, the Supreme Court began to apply the first amendment to law on the state level. Using the establishment clause, the government asserts a separation of church and state ( to an extent). The free exercise clause prevents citizens from losing their right to practice their religion of choice so long as it doesn't interfere with the freedoms of others. Freedom of speech/the press is also given in the first amendment and present so long as the expression does not incite danger/violence.

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What is the 14th Amendment Due Process Clause? - YouTube

What is the 14th Amendment Due Process Clause? This video discusses the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment and its relationship to the 5th Amendment Du...
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Unit 8

2. Due Process Clause

Due Process is a person's right to fair government procedures. Fair trial by jury is an example of a right accredited to due process of law. The 5th amendment outlines that the federal government cannot take away life, liberty, or property without due process of law (this is what is referred to as the due process clause). This is only said to apply to federal government. The 14th amendment provides that state governments abide by the same rules - it protects against state governments as the 5th does against the federal government.

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CNN: Inside the Supreme Court - YouTube

Kate Bolduan takes a rare peek at what lies behind the walls of the Supreme Court.
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Unit 7

1. CNN Video

Other than special occasions, cameras and certain sections of the building are off limits. This is especially true during court proceedings. The Supreme Court did not get an actual building until 1935. The building cost over 9 million dollars at the times. Very little has changed since initial construction, even the furniture. The institution is meant to uphold/display justice and tradition.

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Florida to sue over Obamacare Medicaid expansion

Florida to sue over Obamacare Medicaid expansion | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it
Florida Gov. Rick Scott announced Thursday that his administration will file a lawsuit against the federal government for threatening to withhold more than $1 billion in funding for hospitals if the state fails to expand Medicaid. “It is appalling that President Obama would cut off federal health care dollars to Florida in an effort to force...
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Unit 7

3. Supreme Court Current Event

The federal government is apparently withholding money from Florida. They are doing so on the grounds that the state must comply with procedures to expand Medicaid before hospitals are eligible to receive additional funding. However, while the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Obamacare, it also ruled that the federal government is unable to force ultimatums on the states. This is an example of the court upholding the constitutionality of a law. However, it also shows that the court's rulings are vulnerable to the executive branch that implements them - or rather, has qualms against implementing them.

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Chris Gardner's comment, April 17, 2015 1:03 PM
Unit 7 scoop.it grade 100%; if this case goes to Supreme Court, US is represented by Solicitor General. Do you think Florida's governor looks like Skeletor from He-man cartoons?
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Public Opinion, the Court, and Justice Kennedy

Public Opinion, the Court, and Justice Kennedy | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it
It has been rather challenging for legal scholars to portray the Supreme Court opinions of the past few days as somehow following logically from precedent or even from the past judgments of individ...
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Unit 7

5. Public Opinion Article

The court is susceptible to public opinion due to how the justices are nominated. Their status with Congress and the public can influence the status of their confirmation. They also utilize "institutional legitimacy" which causes them to be more easily influenced by outside sources. Their lifetime terms insulate them, to an extent, from public opinion - as they are less pressured to constantly please the public. They are also insulated by their political ideologies/backgrounds. They are not completely willing to change due to outside influence.

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Fire sale: Ready For Hillary winds down

Fire sale: Ready For Hillary winds down | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it
The agreement spelling the end of Ready For Hillary — the independent super PAC agitating for a Hillary Clinton presidential run — is now finalized, one of the last remaining questions to be settled in the run-up to the official Clinton campaign launch. For over two years, Ready For Hillary has been signing up supporters and raising money...
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Unit 6

10. Hillary Clinton Current Event

Campaigning is actually winding down for Clinton. She has a list of 5 million supports, but the first wave (of sorts) has ended for now. She's donating her bus and leaving old ads/signs without actually pushing them. It is unclear at this point how much her email situation has affected her chances at the presidency. Despite millions in investments, some are still unhappy with the campaign progress in the first place.

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FRB: News & Events

FRB: News & Events | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it
The Federal Reserve Board of Governors in Washington DC.
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Unit 6

8. Federal Reserve

Janet Yellen is the head (chair) of the Federal Reserve.  The Reserve deals with monetary policies - printing money and buying/selling bonds. They are independent due to the amount of time, effort, and expertise to make these policies. They involve intense, careful knowledge of economics that is best left to a professional group. Some of the group's most recent events stem from the press release of the last POMC (March).

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C-SPAN Survey of Presidential Leadership - Overall Ranking - C-SPAN

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Unit 6
6. Ranking a President

According to this ranking, FDR is the third greatest president. His highest score was in the area of crisis management - understandable for all the policies he helped put in place to reform the country. His lowest area was economic management - which is also understandable, considering these policies were not necessarily cheap. Personally, I would consider FDR to be the president. His management of a crisis combined with his efforts to help many underrepresented citizens was a defining time for American history and helped/will help countless individuals.

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The White House Is No Place for Wimps

The White House Is No Place for Wimps | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it
Lyndon Johnson got things done. Yes, he was a visionary—the architect of sweeping social and economic programs that transformed life in the United States and that still shape our nation today. But in the many hours I spent working for LBJ, I saw that he had much more than big ideas: He knew how to make them happen. How to trade, to cajole, to...
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Unit 6

4. Presidential Power and Public Relations Research

Presidents are pressured no more than ever to maintain moderate policy decisions in order to be seen as an acceptable leader. LBJ and FDR made big changes but had to be less bipartisan/middle ground to do so. While being bold would be a solid option, divided government makes this especially difficult (more so for upcoming democratic candidates). Also, a variety of social and economic conditions make big policy changes difficult, as the country is often in a more delicate state (politically and/or financially).

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Reagan asks Gorbachev to "Tear Down This Wall" - YouTube

This has been adapted from the full video of the speech, which comes courtesy of the Miller Center of the University of Virginia. The video, audio, and trans...
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Unit 6

2. Roles of the President

In this video, Reagan is acting as Chief Diplomat. He addressed Gorbachev abroad to promote "human liberty" and strengthen the cause of "world peace." This promoted a clear stance of the American people/American relations on opinions concerning the wall. While this may not have accurately represented everyone's opinion (though it represented many), he still spoke on behalf of the country - fulfilling his role of Chief Diplomat.

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LawCraft | iCivics

LawCraft | iCivics | 6 Alston Daniel | Scoop.it
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Unit 5

10. Lawcraft

Getting a bill passed seems to be a rather delicate matter. Not only does there have to be a certain amount of agreement in both the House and Senate (60 percent), one has to appeal to the different interests within the parties. A certain level of liberty, generosity, budgeting, etc. is required to find a happy medium. Once this medium is found, agreement must be reached in both the House AND Senate before the bill can even go off to the president. Assuming it's not vetoed, a bill can pass.

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History of the Filibuster - YouTube

Discover the interesting history of the filibuster, from Cato the Younger to Rand Paul, and see why it is an important part of the American system of governm...
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Unit 5

8. History of the Filibuster

A filibuster is an extended speech use to stop legislation. If uninterrupted, it can force a bill to stop from passing. In the senate, this can be crucial for the minority party in order to stop something that would otherwise receive majority vote. With 60 percent of the senate vote, a cloture motion can be put in place. This can set a time limit and stop a filibuster. I learned that, due to their extensive nature, filibusters are both repetitive and obnoxious - this is possibly what leads to the other party relenting on some occasions.

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