460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45
37.9K views | +11 today
Follow
460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45
Dedicated to the air and ground crews of 460 squadron (1941-45) and the Lancaster Bombers they flew.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Inside a Lancaster bomber

Inside a Lancaster bomber | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it
A trip inside the 'City of Lincoln" a Lancaster bomber that is now part of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Bomber Command Movie: The Dam Busters (1955)

Bomber Command Movie: The Dam Busters (1955) | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

The Dam Busters is a 1955 British Second World War war film starring Michael Redgrave and Richard Todd and directed by Michael Anderson. The film recreates the true story of Operation Chastise when in 1943 the RAF’s 617 Squadron attacked the Möhne, Eder and Sorpe dams in Germany with Wallis’s “bouncing bomb”. The film was based on the books The Dam Busters (1951) by Paul Brickhill and Enemy Coast Ahead (1946) by Guy Gibson.

 

The film falls into two parts. The first part involves Wallis struggling to develop a means of attacking Germany’s dams in the hope of crippling German heavy industry. Working for the Ministry of Aircraft Production, as well as doing his own job at Vickers, he works feverishly to make practical his theory of a bouncing bomb which would skip over the water to avoid protective torpedo nets. When it came into contact with the dam, it would sink before exploding, making it much more destructive.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Bomber Command heros buried in Alsacian France.

Bomber Command heros buried in Alsacian France. | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

A French farmer living in a little Alsacian village situated a few miles from the Rhine River and the German border talks about a Lancaster bomber and crew shot down and killed on April 27 to 28 1944. He says:

"I was surprised to read a memorial has recently been unveiled recognising, very late – 67 years after the end of the war – the courage and sacrifice of 55,000 men from the Bomber Command. Those who are buried in our village cemetery were always respected as heroes."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

70th Anniversary of the Operations of Bomber Command

70th Anniversary of the Operations of Bomber Command | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

Bomber Command was at one point the principal way the Allied forces had to attack Germany. It was a fight that maintained the morale of the Western publics during the harshest and darkest days of the war. Twenty thousand Australians served during that campaign; 3,500 gave their lives and have the gratitude of this nation. Their actions and sacrifices have made the world and Australia a better place.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

The Merlin: The engine that saved the free world?

The Merlin: The engine that saved the free world? | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

Merlins still inspire thousands of enthusiasts. “But it got better and better as the war went on. It was there, it could be relied upon, it would work.”Once Britain was safe from invasion, attention turned to striking back through Bomber Command – but its planes often suffered savage losses.However, from late 1941 the Lancaster, powered by four Merlins, gave the RAF the ability hit the Third Reich hard.Mr McKinstry said: “With its vast capacity, capable of carrying 22,000 pounds, the Lancaster needed a special engine and, as the epitome of reliability, the Merlin was ideally suited to the task.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Flying on the Lancaster Bomber

As part of my visit to the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, I took a one-hour flight on the B-1 Avro Lancaster (one of only two remaining air-worthy Lancasters left in the world today). The plane was the primary bomber used by the RAF & Canadian Air Force in their attacks on Axis-controlled Europe in World War II. Flying on such a historic aircraft was a once-in-a-lifetime experience and quite moving, actually. I will never forget this.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Battle Stations - Lancaster Bomber

55,000 British Bomber Command airmen were lost during the air war over Nazi-occupied Europe; souls that did not know nothing about "political correctness" but knew well the future of their nations depended critically on their then present job. Beautiful machines flown by brave men.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Bomber Command's war

Bomber Command's war | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it
Images from World War II showing the young volunteer crews from Bomber Command taking the fight to Nazi Germany.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Peter Isaacson - 460 Squadron

Peter Isaacson - 460 Squadron | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

Peter Stuart Isaacson AM, DFC, AFC, DFM (born 31 July 1920) is an Australian publisher and decorated military pilot. He was owner of Peter Isaacson Publications, the publisher of various trade publications and suburban newspapers including the Southern Cross and the Sunday Observer in Melbourne. He served in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) as a pilot with RAF Bomber Command during World War II, and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Force Cross and the Distinguished Flying Medal.


Isaacson became well-known in Australia for his tours in the Avro Lancaster bomber Q-for-Queenie to promote the sale of war loans, and in particular for flying his plane under the Sydney Harbour Bridge in October 1943. He transferred to the RAAF Reserve after the war, retiring as a wing commander in 1969. Since 1956 he has served as a Trustee, Chairman, and finally Life Governor of the Victorian Shrine of Remembrance. In 1991 he was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for his publishing and community work.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Australian veterans join Bomber Command commemoration - ABC Online

Australian veterans join Bomber Command commemoration - ABC Online | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

We flew from 460 Squadron and Group Captain Hugh Edwards, he was a VC, he was a West Australian and he let us fly together as long as we didn't tell our parents and they never knew until the war was over.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

AUSTRALIA'S OLDEST POW - 460 Squadron

AUSTRALIA'S OLDEST POW - 460 Squadron | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it
AUSTRALIA'S OLDEST POW - Gordon Lake was flying a Wellington bomber when he was shot down over Germany and became a POW in Germany, Poland and East Prussia from 1942 to 1945. He is believed to be the only POW to reach 100 years.  In 1942, the then 29-year-old tail gunner was the only surviving crew member of his Royal Australian Air Force 460 Squadron Wellington bomber, shot down over Germany after a raid on Stuttgart.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Photo Journal: The RAF bombers of the Second World War

Photo Journal: The RAF bombers of the Second World War | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it
Images from the RAF Museum of air and ground crews from the Second World War involved in flying and servicing its fleet of bombing aircraft.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Bomber Command memorial portraits: then and now

Bomber Command memorial portraits: then and now | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

The new portraits of the airmen, which sit alongside official service photos from their time at Bomber Command during the Second World War. Featured: Warrent Officer David Fellows - air gunner - 460 Squadron.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Death by Moonlight: Bomber Command

Death by Moonlight: Bomber Command | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

This feature-length documentary focuses on the Canadian pilots who served in the air force bomber command in Britain during World War II. From the outset, it was clear to Britain that air combat would be the key factor in the battle against Hitler's Germany. Told they would be targeting factories and military targets, the airmen were actually ordered to drop their payloads on civilians in an attempt to annihilate the enemy. Using interviews, re-enactments, old footage and photographs, Brian McKenna's film depicts the war from the perspective of the pilots.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

460 Squadron in Brisbane

460 Squadron in Brisbane | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

Beneath one of the plaques is a representation of a boomerang, symbolising the motto of the Squadron: ‘Strike and Return’. Sadly, many of the airmen of 460 Squadron struck… but did not return. In fact, the Squadron suffered by far the highest casualty rate of any Australian unit in WWII: out of around 2700 airmen who served in the Squadron, more than 1000 were killed in action – 589 of those being Australians. 181 aircraft were lost on operations in the four years of the Squadron’s existence.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

On the 25th August 1940, Bomber Command retaliate.

On the 25th August 1940, Bomber Command retaliate. | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

Many of Fighter Command’s airmen became famous after the Battle of Britain, as their stories of heroism and sacrifice spread across the country. But during that period, from 10 July until 31 October 1940, it was Bomber Command that made the greater sacrifice, losing 718 men compared with Fighter Command’s 544. Yet it is only recently that the men of Bomber Command have been remembered, with the unveiling of a new memorial in June 2012. Churchill’s Few may have won the Battle of Britain with their prowess, but the devotion of the Many played a significant role too.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Lancasters & Bomber Command

Lancasters & Bomber Command | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

A web site about bomber command and Lancaster Bombers maintained by Adam Purcell titled ... The search for the story of Lancaster B for Baker

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Lancaster Bomber Crew

Lancaster Bomber Crew | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

Photo left at the opening of the new bomber command memorial in London.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Tributes paid to bomber veteran

Tributes paid to bomber veteran | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it
A WAR hero who flew 34 bombing missions during the Second World War and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal has died at the age of 87.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

The Whirlwind. Remembering Bomber Command

The Whirlwind. Remembering Bomber Command | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

The Whirlwind. Remembering Bomber Command. "They sowed the wind and now they are going to reap the whirlwind." This was Air Chief Marshall Sir Arthur “Bomber” Harris’s uncompromising vow to Germany, and he was a man of his word. He hated it when a single bomber was diverted to theatres other than bombing German cities. It was this historically contentious dirty work – highly dangerous – which prevented the men of Bomber Command (1936 – 1968) during WWII from receiving the recognition and honour they deserved: medals were not struck. But 55,573 crew (44.4%) never returned from their deadly missions. On every mission, they left knowing that they had around a 50-50 chance of making it back. Harris was eventually, and controversially, commemorated with a statue at St Clement

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Bomber Command's great contribution in WW2

Squadron LeaderTony Iveson DFC talks about the important role bomber command played in saving Great Briton and in the victory and liberation of Europe in 1942-45.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

"460 Squadron" Lincolnshire, England. 1944-12-08

"460 Squadron" Lincolnshire, England. 1944-12-08 | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

Lincolnshire, England. 1944-12-08. Group portrait close up of air and ground crew members of Lancaster No. 460 Squadron RAAF at RAF Station Binbrook. In the centre front row (gloveless, holding a pipe) is Group Captain Parsons, the Station Commander. On either side of him are Squadron Leader (Sqn Ldr) J. Clarke DFC AFC, of Sydney, NSW (left), the CO of the Squadron, and Sqn Ldr J. R. Henderson DFC, of Mosman, NSW, Flight Commander. (My dad with Pilot hat just under the right hand engine)

more...
Michelle Rosenberg's curator insight, April 24, 2013 8:28 AM

My French Grandfather, Pierre Scordel is in the front row , the second man to the right of the Group Captain. His uniform is lighter and his hat different as he is wearing the French Air Force uniform. If anyone has more information, please share. Thanks.

Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Who Betrayed the Bomber Boys?, Yesterday ...

Who Betrayed the Bomber Boys?, Yesterday ... | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it
Iain Hollingshead reviews Who Betrayed the Bomber Boys?, a Yesterday documentary that explores the achievements of the RAF Bomber Command in the Second World War. History, they say, is written by the victors.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

The entire Bomber Command Memorial service

The entire Bomber Command Memorial service | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

Chief of Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Dalton, gives an address recounting the history of Bomber Command and Churchill's plan to take the fight to Hitler, and cripple Nazi Germany through unrelenting aerial bombing. He reads a much-forgotten part of Churchill's famous Battle of Britain speech hailing Bomber Command.


"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few. All hearts go out to the Fighter pilots, whose brilliant actions we see with our own eyes day after day, but we must never forget that all the time, night after night, month after month, our bomber squadrons travel far into Germany, find their targets in the darkness…aim their attacks, often under the heaviest fire, often with serious loss…and inflict shattering blows upon the whole of the technical and war-making structure of the Nazi power".


"We will remember them," he concludes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter John Baskerville
Scoop.it!

Their last great victory: The new memorial to Bomber Command

Their last great victory: The new memorial to Bomber Command | 460 Squadron - Bomber Command: 1942-45 | Scoop.it

For the facts are as follows. Throughout World War II, no other arm of the Forces suffered a casualty rate as dismal as that of the 125,000 men who flew with Bomber Command. For 55,573 of them were killed, 8,400 were wounded and 10,000 taken prisoner.


And yet, come peacetime, the unparalleled sacrifice of this section of the Armed Forces — who, yes, bombed German cities as the Luftwaffe bombed ours — went largely overlooked. Winston Churchill, his ministers and their successors did not want to relinquish the moral high ground as they helped to reshape Europe.

 

 

These men are the last witnesses of events which have shaped our entire national identity. They have never forgotten the boys who didn’t come home. How shameful that it has taken the rest of us 67 years to remember them, too

 

more...
SASFOR's comment, June 28, 2012 3:05 AM
Thank you Sir, we all at SASFOR follow your scoops with the greatest of interest.
Peter John Baskerville's comment, June 28, 2012 9:25 AM
Thanks for letting me know. It gives me further motivation to keep going. I am mostly doing it for my father who was a pilot with Bomber Command 460 Squadron during WW2. I just want to honor what he called "a great Command and a splendid company of men who willingly went each night in jeopardy of their lives"