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1964 Civil Rights Act Fast Facts

1964 Civil Rights Act Fast Facts | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
Here is a look at the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Its signing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964 is considered the nation's most important civil rights legislation since Reconstruction (1865-1877) as it prohibited discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Following that law, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed landmark civil rights bills including the 1965 Voting Rights Act and the 1968 Fair Housing Act.
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This link shows the Civil Rights act through various pictures. The first picture is of Lyndon B Johnson and MLK shaking hands after the signing of the 1964 act.  Some other highlights include Jackie Robinson (who broke the color barrier in sports) and Rosa Parks (who refused to give up her seat to a white man).  It also features Elizabeth Eckford, the first black student to go to an all white high school in Little Rock. And finally, it shows some sit ins at restaurants and the freedom riders on their journey.

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11. AP60X - Equal Protection Clause - YouTube

Advanced Placement Government review in 60 seconds for Xtraordinary results. Workin' it one word at a time. Presented by citizenu.org and the 2 Teachers.
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This is a video about the clause of the Fourteenth Amendment that is called the equal protection clause. This states that no state shall deny any person the equal protection of the laws. The clause was the basis for the Brown v. Board of Education case. In this case, the Supreme Court ruled that segregation in public schools was unconstitutional. This was a landmark for the civil rights movement, but slightly weakened the power of the states.

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Civil Liberties & Bill of Rights - YouTube

Civil Liberties & Bill of Rights
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This is a video about civil liberties, which are the rights that you have that the government cannot take away from you. They cannot take them away from you because either the law, constitution or judicial procedure keeps them from doing it. Some examples are freedom of speech, right to practice religion, and freedom of press. The bill of rights contains all of your civil liberties. Civil liberties were originally state territory, but once the new constitution was drafted all of that changed.

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Breaking News, Analysis, Politics, Blogs, News Photos, Video, Tech Reviews - TIME.com

Breaking News, Analysis, Politics, Blogs, News Photos, Video, Tech Reviews - TIME.com | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
At Kagan's hearings, liberals will seek assurances that she is one of their own, while conservatives will test whether she's within their definition of the mainstream
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Supreme court website

Supreme court website | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title

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This is the Supreme Court website, it has a lot of information. You can see/read about their opinions on cases, issues, and the different counsels. You can also see opinions from different cases and look at case documents. There is also media sources that involve the cases, judges and the court as a whole. One case they are debating now is the Johnson vs. United States case in which they are arguing the Armed Career Criminal Act; This has been ongoing since Oct. 2013.

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Chris Gardner's comment, April 17, 2015 11:50 AM
unit 7 scoop.it 4/6 scoops; 80 points out of 12
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Supreme%20Court%20Procedure%20_%20Cases.pdf

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The Supreme Court can involve in cases concerning constitutional questions, treaties, officials, also cases dealing with states/citizens. They deal with problems between the federal government vs states/citizens. First they deal with the merit of a case and they need to have the writ of certiorari, which gives the information. Then the case goes to a conference where they judges will discuss it. They will then decide whether or not to move forward with the case. If they move it forward, they will get to hear the different briefs. An example of a brief is an amicus brief where they write to try and get a certain case heard. Next the case goes through trial. Then, they weigh the minority and majority opinions. All of this happens under appellate jurisdiction.

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U.S. Department of State

U.S. Department of State | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
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This is the US department of state website. The in office secretary of state is currently John Kerry. The state department has to deal with foreign policy and to keep relations in a stable state. They mainly deal with foreign policy, but they can also deal with national policy dealing with relations to state, since they are the dept of state. Some of the current issues that they are dealing with fall into the categories of economics, energy, and environment.

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Executive Command | iCivics

Executive Command | iCivics | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
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This is a game where I got to be the President I wanted and then got to do what he does. First I had to deliver my state of the union address and I also got to  choose what to talk about. I was then brought back to the White House to read and sign legislations into law. Then i had to keep going back to Congress to try and gain their support on the propositions I have about the topic in the address. Over all I learned that the job of the president is demanding and they will always need you somewhere to do something, so don't sign me up..

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Chris Gardner's comment, April 3, 2015 9:35 AM
Unit 6 scoop.it 9/10 90%
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C-SPAN Survey of Presidential Leadership - Overall Ranking - C-SPAN

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The President I chose is Franklin Delanor Roosevelt. He currently isnranked number 3, but in the year 2000 he was number 2. I chose to analyze him because I admire the way he dealt with his disability, and still was able to maintain the presidency. He also focused on  public opinion, and dealt with many difficulties during his time in office. Even though I would like for him to be higher, it makes sense that George Washington and Abraham Lincoln are before him.

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Who Is Running for President (and Who’s Not)?

Who Is Running for President (and Who’s Not)? | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
At least a dozen Republicans and a handful of Democrats have expressed an interest in running for their party’s 2016 presidential nomination.
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This article basically explains who is and whos not going to run for President. On the republican side, Ted Cruz is the only one definitely running  with competitors such as Jeb Bus, Chris Christie, Mike Huckabee, and others. However, Mitt Romney is not going to run, which I found to be surprising. On the democratic side, only a handful of people have said the might run for president, there are no definite candidates. The people thinking about running are Hilary Clinton, Jim Webb, and Martin O'Malley. Also, current Vice President Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren have not decided on running or not yet.

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The President - Strengths and Weaknesses - YouTube

Listen and learn the basics about the American presidency. Is the President of the United States the most powerful person in the world or a pitiful helpless ...
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This video is about the strengths and weaknesses of the US President. He is the executive branch and has many departments underneath him. According to the constitution the president has the powers of being commander in chief, commissioning offices, calling special sessions of congress, etc. he is more powerful if he can bargain with congress. He is also powerful when he can mobilize public opinion. Economic crisis, unpopular war, and other conflict is the main causes to his weaknesses.

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History of the Filibuster - YouTube

Discover the interesting history of the filibuster, from Cato the Younger to Rand Paul, and see why it is an important part of the American system of governm...
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A filibuster is when a congressman stands in front of a courtroom or a committee and talks about a bill for a VERY long period of time. They drag it on to keep it from being voted on and passed. On the other hand, cloture motion is when someone abruptly ends a debate. This effects the filibuster because it stops them from talking and gives a chance for the bill they are fighting about to be voted on and passed. From this video I learned the lengths people have gone using the filibuster, like someone talking from sun up to sundown. However, it was successful in keeping the bill from being voted on which proves that this is a good way to keep legislation from being passed.

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Congressman Jody Hice

Congressman Jody Hice | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
Representing the 10th District of Georgia
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Representative Hice has recently voted on many pieces of legislation, but there has been only one piece that he has voted a definite yes on. The piece is trying to protect volunteer fire fighters and emergency responders. This is a very good idea to me because my uncle is a firefighter. Mr. Hice can preform many constituent services, including Military academy nominations, event requests, flags, tours, etc. His visit to Ola High School was really cool and I wish I could have been there. Although, I liked knowing our letters are the ones that brought him to Ola.

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Chris Gardner's comment, March 20, 2015 9:35 AM
UNIT 5 9/10 SCOOPS; 180 POINTS OUT OF 200
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The First Amendment for Dummies: The Basics of the 1st Amendment Explained - YouTube

Continuing the Constitution for Dummies Series with the Bill of Rights and Amendment One. Explained simply so you can understand the Constitution of the Unit...
Story Destinee's insight:

This is a video about the first amendment. The first amendment in the consitution is very important because the person the right to free speech, assembly, religion, and the ability to petition. The founding fathers created this amendment so the the government does not become to powerful and also there could be a separation of church and state. Free exercise clause protects that basis of the amendment.

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What is the 14th Amendment Due Process Clause? - YouTube

What is the 14th Amendment Due Process Clause? This video discusses the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment and its relationship to the 5th Amendment Du...
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This video is basically about the due process clause which is a persons right to fair government procedures and laws. One of the aspects of this is a persons right to a fair trial by a jury. The 14th amendment prohibits state governments from taking away one's life, liberty, and property without due process of law. The 5th amendment though, is only applied to the federal government. 

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How the Supreme Court Responds to Public Opinion

How the Supreme Court Responds to Public Opinion | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
It has been rather challenging for legal scholars to portray the Supreme Court opinions of the past few days as somehow following logically from precedent or even from the past…
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Chief Justice John Roberts reports for jury duty, is rejected

Chief Justice John Roberts reports for jury duty, is rejected | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
Even Chief Justice John Roberts can’t escape his civic duties.The Supreme Court justice reported for duty as “Juror 49” in Rockville, Maryland, on Wednesday morning, The Washington Post reported.Roberts was being considered for a case relating to a 2013 car crash. The judge asked a group of about 50 potential jurors to identify any...
Story Destinee's insight:

In this article it talks about chief justice John Roberts being called for jury duty.They asked him a series of questions like if anyone he is close to has been involved in car accidents, but they didn't ask him about his profession. He was juror 49 out of 50. Two guards accompanied him through this process. Ultimately though, he was rejected.

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CNN: Inside the Supreme Court - YouTube

Kate Bolduan takes a rare peek at what lies behind the walls of the Supreme Court.
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In this video I learned a lot about the Supreme Court Building. I learned that there are only 2 pictures of court cases being held because the cameras were snuck in. They wanted this so this building blended in with the library of congress and the capitol. The building is also only 75 yrs old before that, for almost 130 years, the supreme court didn't have a building to itself. The whole building is made of mostly marble too. Theres also a library for looking up other opinions and such on different topics. A strange fact is that they have different traditions for the judges to do when a case is held, an example being the way they enter the room.

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The price of Barack Obama’s Iran muddle

The price of Barack Obama’s Iran muddle | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
President Barack Obama needs a win in the Middle East. Instead, he’s getting a muddle. International negotiators in Switzerland ran up against their deadline for the Iran nuclear talks — and then kept on running, insisting that there’s enough reason to believe that maybe they’ll get far enough on Wednesday, or maybe a couple...
Story Destinee's insight:

This article is talking about how President Obama is losing the trust of the Middle East. It shows how Obama has tried to make an Iran deal since 2008, but is still being criticized for not doing it yet. An Iran deal will have no effect on the rest of the Middle East as a whole. Obama showed unwillingness when he backed out of Syria in 2013. It also shows that he is too afraid to defend his point and to make any kind of agreement with the whole Middle East at all, even though that's what he's being pushed to do.

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The White House

The White House | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
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The white house has a ton of different sections in it. These include a briefing room, a meeting room, a kitchen and a china room. The White House also has two gardens, The Kennedy garden and the other being a rose garden. I could look at the Presidents schedule too. I was expecting him to be really busy, but all he had going on was yesterday was a briefing lunch meeting with the Vice President.

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Welcome to the CIA Web Site — Central Intelligence Agency

Welcome to the CIA Web Site — Central Intelligence Agency | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
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This is the website for the US CIA. The director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is John Brennan. The CIA is an agency that is responsible for providing national security intelligence. They give all their information to US policy leaders. Personally, I think that they are independent from the president and congress. The agency deals with operations that need to be kept secret, even though they are commanded by the president, though. One of the more current events that are shown on the website is that the CIA recently declassified the corona case.

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Why Presidents Are Also Celebrities

Why Presidents Are Also Celebrities | 4 Story Destinee | Scoop.it
The Roosevelts transformed the United States—and made its leaders into stars.
Story Destinee's insight:

The presidency has many jobs attached to it, and a lot more for person that takes the position. People think that there is a list of complicated facts about the presidency, the author of this article argues that the most important fact is that we ask to much from them. The author mentions the amount of jobs the President is expected to keep up with, such as being commander in chief while also the head of state, and leader of political parties. He constantly talks about Teddy Roosevelt being shot, and then still going on to take his speech, while still having the bullet inside of him. The presidency is too stressful and requires too much of the person who owns that title.  

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Congressional District Lines - Who Draws Them? ⎢Civics in a Minute⎢TakePart TV - YouTube

lukeSubscribe for more TakePart TV now!: http://full.sc/SwIjS1 Ever look at a map of congressional districts and wondered why it looks like someone spilled color...

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The video is about congressional district lines and how they are drawn. Every ten years they conduct a census to divide up the 435 seats in the House and assigning districts. However, It is up to the congressional officials to draw the official dividing lines. They have all this power so the lines are often drawn up in unfair ways, an example would be drawling a line just to keep an incumbent in the same district. They also use this to push away opponents. They either pack or crack districts by putting a whole bunch of people of the same party in one district or they do the exact opposite and put a lot less.

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Bill: A Memoir - YouTube

Learn how a bill becomes a law.
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In order for a bill to become a law, it has to through a ton of steps. Bills can be introduced in either the house or the senate. First, bills go to committee in the house in order for them to be studied, marked, and voted on. If passed through, they are sent to the open floor where they are then voted on. With enough votes, it is sent to the senate where the process repeats, but different rules apply. Then, if voted on and passed through again, it gets sent to the president to be signed or vetoed. Both the senate and house of reps have very different rules for passing legislation and the bill can be killed at any step.

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