3 Carden Kimberly
87 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

Civil Rights and the 1950s: Crash Course US History #39 - YouTube

You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is ni...
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 8

5. The 1950's are well known as a period of consensus and equal opportunity. The economy, at this time was expanding and suffering a great deal of prosperity. At this time in history, segregation of public accommodations was not only the decorum of society, but it was the law in the south- the north was just custom. 

 

African Americans were mostly living in poverty and when it came to employment, whites always got the upper hand and promotions while African Americans stayed low and unemployed. Their education was also limited by segregated schools. Blacks at this time were treated unfairly. The Civil Rights movement began with Rosa Parks. Basically, civil right issues were around for decades, bu it wasn't until the 50's when African Americans started winning. The primary goal was to desegregate schools, which Earl Warren did by signing an order that repealed all school segregation in the state of California. Earl Warren was a Supreme Court justice at the time the Brown vs Board of Education case took place. Thurgood Marshall was also a civil rights activist, heading the NAACP. The NAACP had been trying pursue a legal strategy trying to live up to the ruling of Plessy vs. Ferguson. Plessy vs Ferguson was a case that required public schools to be separate but equal. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

11. AP60X - Equal Protection Clause - YouTube

Advanced Placement Government review in 60 seconds for Xtraordinary results. Workin' it one word at a time. Presented by citizenu.org and the 2 Teachers.
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 8

3. The Equal Protection Clause of the 14th amendment ensures that we, as citizens are equally represented in the court of law. The most famous equal protection clause case is the Board of Education, when the Supreme Court in the 1950s ruled that it is illegal to have segregation in public schools. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

Civil Liberties & Bill of Rights - YouTube

Civil Liberties & Bill of Rights
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 8

1. Civil Liberties are the personal rights and freedoms government cannot interfere with wither by law, the Constitution, or the judicial procedure. A few civil liberties are: a right to private life and practice religion of choice, and they can be found in the Bill of Rights.

 

The Bill of Rights includes the first ten amendments of the Constitution and guaranteed civil liberties that states wanted recognized. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

April 14th Assignment

3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 7

6. The jurisdiction of the Supreme Court is to handle multiple:

questions of the Constitution, treaties, hearings of ambassadors/officials, controversies between states, citizens and states and citizens and controversies between the federal gov, states and or citizens. Every case the Supreme Court falls under the Court's "appellate jurisdiction" to be reviewed and revised or overturned.

 

Justices can pick and choose cases; ultimately receiving about 8,000/year. These cases are introduced to the Court by appealing or by appellate jurisdiction. Very rarely, some cases go directly to the court. For justices to consider a case, they are required to have a "writ of centiorari" to be fully informed. Justices will vote on these writs during conferences. To ensure integrity in the court, the court will have conferences. In order to decide what case the court wants to hear, they listen to "amicus briefs" which are basically summaries of both sides. Once they choose, they release majority and minority opinions for oral arguments against the case.

 

 

 

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

When Liberals and Conservatives Agree on Women’s Rights

When Liberals and Conservatives Agree on Women’s Rights | 3 Carden Kimberly | Scoop.it
You don’t hear much these days about liberals and conservatives working together, let alone to further women’s rights. But last week, the efforts of such a caucus paid off, when the Supreme Court lightened the burden for women who sue their employers under the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), the federal law that bars employers from...
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 7

3. In this article, a woman named Peggy Young was challenged at her workplace when she was pregnant. She felt that she was discriminated against due to her impregnation. With that being said, this article shows how political ideologies come together in support of Peggy suing her workplace. The burden was lifted off of women who sue their employers due to PDA (pregnant discrimination act). The system of a Care Caucus can achieve when two ideologies come together, whether in the courts or in the legislature, to advance policies that promote women’s rights and support for the family, was put into place. In the Young case, the Care Caucus emerged. Some pro business conservatives emerged and opposed requiring accommodations for pregnant workers like Peggy Young, because doing so would infringe too much on employers’ discretion. Other conservatives openly supported Young.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

CNN: Inside the Supreme Court - YouTube

Kate Bolduan takes a rare peek at what lies behind the walls of the Supreme Court.
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 7

1. The Supreme Court is the most important court in the government. For almost 150 years, the Supreme Court was homeless. It moved from New York to Philadelphia and opened up in 1935. The court room is completely unchanged and almost all chambers are off limits to the public. There are also portraits of each and every former justice in history lining the walls where the new justices are sworn in.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

Executive Command | iCivics

Executive Command | iCivics | 3 Carden Kimberly | Scoop.it
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 6

9. This game is an entertaining way to go through the steps of being elected as President. When the President is first elected, he has to be inaugurated. After that, he gives his State of the Union address to the Congress. Here, he promises his main focuses on common topics, such as the deficit reduction. The President then checks bills mailed to him for approval or disapproval. If the President signs the bill into the law, he then sends the bill to the correct department to be put into effect. Presidents are encouraged to remember the issue they focused on at the State of Union, in order to maintain support from Congress. This game illustrates the busy schedule that the President deals with everyday

more...
Chris Gardner's comment, April 3, 2015 8:31 AM
Unit 6 scoop.it grade 100%; good choices and excellent insight in this unit. 200 points
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

U.S. Department of State

U.S. Department of State | 3 Carden Kimberly | Scoop.it
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 6

7. John Kerry is the current secretary of state. This department's primary focus is on maintaining peace between the US and other nations. The Department of State deals with policies on political-military affairs and human rights. As of today, they're currently dealing with issues regarding with terrorism. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

The White House

The White House | 3 Carden Kimberly | Scoop.it
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 6

5. So I'd most likely get lost in the White House.. There are more rooms than I ever thought there was. But the President has the busiest schedule. He wakes up and has about an hour and a half to himself before he departs the White House. Every move he makes has a purpose and is scheduled. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

Video: State of the Union 2015 in 90 seconds

Video: State of the Union 2015 in 90 seconds | 3 Carden Kimberly | Scoop.it
POLITICO recaps the highlights of President Barack Obama's 2015 State of the Union address in 90 seconds.
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 6

3. This is a small portion of President Obama's State of Union Address. The concept of this speech is to focus on what is happening in the government and the nation as a whole. Obama implies that he will not be running for another term and due to that, he will make decisions that are not popular with the public but he believes will overall help the country.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

Article II for Dummies: The Executive Branch Explained - YouTube

Hip Hughes History lays down the tracks for the train of learning. So jump aboard and learn the essentials of Executive Power through Article II of the US Co...
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 6

1. From this video, I learned multiple things from Article II. According to Article II of the constitution, you are required to be 35 years old to run for President, to consistently live in the United States for 14 years, and you're also required to be a naturally born citizen.


According to the video, the President is the enforcer of the law and he has a bully pulpit. If the President and the majority party in Congress have the same ideology, then they will tend to work in union. The President makes adjustments on laws and proposes his own. However, Congress is the one responsible for executing laws and the President is the one who enforces it. Although, the President is also commander in chief, he cannot declare war, only congress has the ability to do so. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

Bill: A Memoir - YouTube

Learn how a bill becomes a law.
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 5

10. Our legislature is bicameral, including the House which is based off of population and the Senate with only 100 members. Congress is involved in many activities such as oversight, constituent services but most importantly, they write bills. Congress is empowered to make laws. 

 

A bill can be by anyone, including interest groups. But only a member of Congress can introduce it. A bill can be introduced in any house unless its a revenue bill, which can only be introduced in the House. In the House of Representatives, a bill is dropped into the hopper and then the Speaker assigns the bill to a committee.The bill is then studied and revised by professionals. If the bill passes committee it's assigned to the rules committee which the majority party determines the rules. If the bill passes through the committee and then the rules committee, it then goes to the floor to debate. Here, it is determined if the bill is relevant or germane. If it passes the House of Representatives, it is then sent to the Senate.

 

The bill has to be introduced to the Senate the same way as it was in the House. The majority leader then assigns the bill to a committee like in the House. It follows the same routine in the Senate as it does in the House until it passes the committee. Instead of going to the rules committee, it's sent straight to the floor. It is more difficult to pass a bill in the the Senate due to the filibuster technique. During the debate, it has to have 60 votes to pass anything.

 

If both the House and the Senate pass the bill, it is sent to the President. He can either sign or veto. If he does sign it, it has to take place in 10 days. If the President vetos, Congress has the right to overturn it, but that is very unlikely to happen. If the bill makes it through this whole process, it then becomes a law.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

History of the Filibuster - YouTube

Discover the interesting history of the filibuster, from Cato the Younger to Rand Paul, and see why it is an important part of the American system of governm...
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 5

8. According to the video, Rand Paul filibustered the floor of the senate on the popular topic of drones by speaking for a twelve hours on the floor of the Senate.  Albert Brown was the first person to use the word 'Filibuster' in its political sense. Filibusters are used to delay the passing of a law by simply taking an incredible amount of time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

The First Amendment for Dummies: The Basics of the 1st Amendment Explained - YouTube

Continuing the Constitution for Dummies Series with the Bill of Rights and Amendment One. Explained simply so you can understand the Constitution of the Unit...
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 8

4. The Bill of Rights were written for the federal government and that federal law. The states have their own Constitutions. It wasn't until after the 14th amendment that states have to yield to the Bill of Rights concepts of equal protection and due process. Throughout the twentieth-century, the Supreme Court begins to selectively incorporate the Bill of Rights to the states. 

 

The Establishment Clause is when Congress cannot create a law respecting the establishment of religion. This ensured the separation of church and state. The Free Exercise clause secures people's civil liberties by protecting freedom of religion. In the first amendment of the Constitution, there are many "freedoms" that the framers wanted to give to the citizens. Those are freedom of speech, where you're free to say what you wish as long as it doesn't cause problems, freedom of press, which means Congress cannot establish laws that abridge the press, the right to petition or lobby the government, and then your right to assembly.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

What is the 14th Amendment Due Process Clause? - YouTube

What is the 14th Amendment Due Process Clause? This video discusses the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment and its relationship to the 5th Amendment Du...
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 8

2. The Due Process Clause is a person's right to fair government procedures. For example, someone cannot be sentenced to prison just because he accused of committing a crime. The due process ensures that the person accused has the right to a fair trial by jury before they are sent to prison.

 

The 14th amendment provides that the state government cannot take away a person's life, liberty, or property without due process of law. Before a state government can take away someone's life, liberty, or property, they must provide the due process of law. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

Thomas Confirmation Hearings Had Ripple Effect

Today's Supreme Court confirmation process was shaped by what happened at the hearings for Clarence Thomas 20 years ago. The hearings also changed America's political, judicial and cultural landscape.
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 7

4. Some characteristics of Supreme Court nominees that may be relevant to being appointed by the President would be political ideology, race, and even in some cases, like the one in this article, scandals. In this article, there are some controversial characteristics that justice Clarence Thomas has. One being that he's not a traditional Conservative Republican. He is not the kind of justice who believes that law should be built up over time. Instead, he, more than any other justice, believes that the court over the past century has gotten large parts of the law wrong, and that those rulings should be reversed. According to this article, Thomas is the second African-American appointed to the court. He has proved to be the ideological opposite of the man he replaced, Justice Thurgood Marshall. He votes often against civil rights claims, and his own feelings of being underestimated because of his race come out most clearly in affirmative cases.  Lastly, he managed to overcome the sexual accusations placed against him.


It's somewhat more difficult for interest groups to directly influence the appointing of Supreme Court officials because they're not elected by the public. Although, interest groups can influence the confirmation of a nominee by using grassroots to protest or support a nominee. Every interest group has a representative who needs their support to win campaigns. So interest groups get their opinions heard by their representative, because confirming a nominee that interest groups don't want, can cost a representative contribution. It's like the "I'll scratch your back if you scratch mine" saying.

more...
Chris Gardner's comment, April 17, 2015 10:44 AM
GREAT INSIGHT; UNIT 7 SCOOP.IT GRADE 120/120
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

How the Supreme Court Responds to Public Opinion

How the Supreme Court Responds to Public Opinion | 3 Carden Kimberly | Scoop.it
It has been rather challenging for legal scholars to portray the Supreme Court opinions of the past few days as somehow following logically from precedent or even from the past…
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 7 

5. The Supreme Court is not required to respond to public opinion in its policy-making procedures. However, public opinion may influence which judges may be appointed. To maintain contentment between the government and the public, they listen to other political members such as senators, who represent the people. This ensures that the justices don't stray too far from the public's wants. If cases come into the court, the justices may also refer to public opinion's to determine which cases are important the country as a whole.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

Supreme Court

Supreme Court | 3 Carden Kimberly | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title

3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 7

2. This site is a source for people to get the inside scoop on what's going on inside the Supreme Court. There is a calendar available on the front page of the website that lists the dates of scheduled arguments and conferences coming up.

 

To the right of the page, there are multiple, dated, decisions that one can click on and learn more about the topics. The number one on the list is the "Armstrong v. Exceptional Child Center, Inc." This case was brought into question whether or not section (30)(A) of the Medicaid Act provides a private right of action for Medicaid providers against states under the Supremacy Clause, even when Congress has not explicitly created the right, or not. The Supreme Court came to the conclusion on 3/31, that the Supreme Court will consider whether individual Medicaid providers have a private right of action under the Supremacy Clause to enforce section (30)(A), which will require state Medicaid agencies to take provider costs into account when setting reimbursement rates, when Congress has not explicitly granted a private right of action. The Court’s ruling will impact the rights of individuals to recover under the Supremacy Clause as well as the administration of Medicaid and other statutory schemes that provide funding to states as long as they comply with federal law. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

What to look for in an Iran nuclear deal

What to look for in an Iran nuclear deal | 3 Carden Kimberly | Scoop.it
As President Barack Obama pushes to reach a nuclear deal with Iran by a Tuesday deadline, a small army of critics — from congressional Republicans to Israeli leaders to the Saudi royal family — is ready to pounce on any weaknesses to persuade Congress and the global community to turn against the pact. “They are about to make a mistake...
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 6

10. This article discusses Obama pushing a nuclear deal with Iran and some do not agree with it. According to this article, Rep. Sen. Lindsey Graham said “They are about to make a mistake for the ages,”. If there’s no deal by Tuesday, there’s no practical reason the United States and  its partners couldn’t keep negotiating. In practice, the real deadline of  concern for the Obama White House is April 13, when the Senate is scheduled to  return from its Easter recess — and will likely take up legislation cracking  down on Iran if a framework is not in hand.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

US Environmental Protection Agency

US Environmental Protection Agency | 3 Carden Kimberly | Scoop.it
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 6

8. Gina McCarthy is in charge of the U.S Environmental Protection Agency. Appointed by President Obama in 2009 as Assistant Administrator for EPA’s Office of Air and Radiation, Gina McCarthy has been a leading advocate for common-sense strategies to protect public health and the environment. The EPA implements several policies to protect human health and the environment. They use national efforts to reduce environmental risk are based on the best available scientific information.

 

EPA is independent from the federal government because they strive off of citizens. A current issue of the Environmental Protection Agency is mold and moisture growing in homes. There is a link that leads you to a page that answers common questions like: "Why is mold growing in my house?" or "Can mold cause health problems?" 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

C-SPAN Survey of Presidential Leadership - Overall Ranking - C-SPAN

3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 6

6. According the overall ranking of Presidents provided, Ronald Regan is ranked number ten in the history of all Presidents. Delving deeper into his Presidency, Regan's ranking was a bit higher in 2009 than it was in 2000. His intelligence has him in the number three spot for Public Persuasion, although his Administrative Skills placed him in the 30th and 32nd spot.

 

In regards to the chart, Abraham Lincoln is number one for a reason. He has been the President that this country has ever had in my opinion, as well as in others. His rankings remain in the lower single digits in all categories listed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

Elizabeth Price Foley

Elizabeth Price Foley | 3 Carden Kimberly | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Price Foley
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 6

4. On this site, Elizabeth Price Foley made a statement in which she believes that Congress can sue the President. Although it is unlikely, Congress must find that the legislation of a former act is nullified. The law suit should then be authorized by majority of the House. This is important because it represents that the institution feels as if they have been bothered, and not just some legislators who feel hurt by the act.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

Reagan asks Gorbachev to "Tear Down This Wall" - YouTube

This has been adapted from the full video of the speech, which comes courtesy of the Miller Center of the University of Virginia. The video, audio, and trans...
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 6

2. I chose the first video of the playlist provided. In this video, Ronald Reagan demonstrated a democracy in other nations to show that he will recognize other countries that follow the United States. As chief diplomat, he involves himself in other countries.. A chief diplomat is when the President works with leaders of other nations. He is portraying his role as chief diplomat by involving himself with Germany and their ambassador. Reagan using, "Tear Down This Wall" promotes freedom and liberation, illustrates how the US works.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

Women in Congress (Facts of Congress) - YouTube

Civics doesn't need to be dry and boring! Learn Facts of Congress with music and animation in Jib/Jab & Monty Python style from those hilarious folks at Flas...
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 5

4. This video is informative if one desires to learn more about rights for women in Congress. I learned that women received the right to vote in the 1920s. Janett Rankin became the first women in congress in 1916 and she was a member of the House of Representatives. Due to the statistics stated in this video, only 15% of the members of congress are women. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by 3 Carden Kimberly
Scoop.it!

The League of Dangerous Mapmakers

The League of Dangerous Mapmakers | 3 Carden Kimberly | Scoop.it
Who’s most to blame for our divisive politics? How about the gerrymanderers quietly deciding where your vote goes. Inside the dark art and modern science of making democracy a lot less democratic.
3 Carden Kimberly's insight:

UNIT 5

9. Gerrymandering is the process in which elected politicians draw congressional district lines based on polls showing the votes for particular politicians. It's a process that takes place to control who is likely to win the election. Many believe that the idea of allowing politicians to hand pick their constituents is a form of cheating in the election process. Gerrymandering is basically picking who is going to vote for you and there are reformers that are attempting to remove politicians out of the rezoning process to maintain equality in the campaigning process.

more...
No comment yet.