Challenging 21st century learner
1 view | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Dona Bernadette
onto Challenging 21st century learner
Scoop.it!

Ten Top Things Everyone Should Know about Teachers and Digital Learning: Speak Up 2016 Findings, November 2017

Ten Top Things Everyone Should Know about Teachers and Digital Learning: Speak Up 2016 Findings, November 2017 | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
California teachers’ views and experience with educational technology and digital learning in the classroom, 2016.
more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Teach Your Children

Teach Your Children | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
Ten things the next generation will need to know to thrive in the Anthropocene

 

1. How do we feed a global community?

 

By 2030, the U.S. Census Bureau predicts the world population will pass 8 billion. That is roughly 1 billion more people to feed than today, many of whom will have grander expectations of the global food market than access to basic nutrition. Meanwhile, the introduction of

Today’s children — tomorrow’s adults — need to learn how food is really grown, managed and transported across the world.

genetically modified foods into more markets and the spread of industrial agriculture are changing the nature of food production itself. Today’s children — tomorrow’s adults — need to learn how food is really grown, managed and transported across the world. They need to learn what the impacts of those methods are. And they need to know why the system has evolved in this way so they can understand what feeding 8 billion people will need to look like, the impacts of our food choices and the potential trade-offs with the environment that will need to be addressed.

 

2. How do we power a global community?

Very little information about energy is taught in the classroom today, and too often lessons are coupled with an economic or political perspective, pitting human demand against environmental impacts. The 8 billion people of the future will all have energy needs, whether it’s simply fuel for kitchen stoves or the expectation of regular international (or even intergalactic) travel. Students need to understand where energy comes from, the different forms it takes, how it’s used, and the benefits, impacts and risks associated with different energy choices.

3. How do we safely hydrate a global community?

Just as they need to know the sources of both energy and food, children need to learn about where their water comes from and about important sources of water for the global community. Moreover, it’s essential they learn how water is transported and sanitized for consumption, how it is used in agriculture and energy, and its status as a depleted and unreliable resource in some regions. A basic understanding of water infrastructure will provide valuable context for addressing potential conflicts about water use and rights in the future.

4. How do we communicate with a diverse global community?

 

As technology has allowed us to widen our community beyond city, state and even national borders, children need to learn about global cultures, religions and languages — not as a group

Children need to learn about global cultures, religions and languages — not as a group of outsiders, but as part of a larger community.

of outsiders, but as part of a larger community with which we share air, water, food, minerals, energy and other global resources. It’s critical they meet the challenge of cultural exchange and communication, creating a foundation for respectful collaboration in a truly integrated world.

 

5. What other organisms do we count as part of our community?

Children need to broaden their vision of community beyond the human population to include other organisms and ecosystems. Cross-species empathy can drive thoughtful decision making as children become more responsible for other living things. As caretakers of life, they can become engaged in protecting not just their own needs, but those of every living thing on our planet.

6. How do local choices impact the rest of the world?

Respect and appreciation for others (human and nonhuman) can help children make connections between local actions and global impacts. The direct study of the life sciences is key to understanding and valuing the connectivity of their community to global ecosystems, linking local behavior with its more remote repercussions. Children need to recognize that even a perceived positive behavior change such as the locavore movement can have impacts on communities elsewhere by shifting production, management and economic influences to different regions.

7. How can science be a tool for informing political, social and economic decisions?

Well-meaning teachers sometimes attempt to engage students in science by asking them to debate scientific concepts against political or social ideas — pitting environmental concerns against economic ones, for example. This juxtaposition has the potential to confuse students as they begin to see science not as a source of information, but as a rhetorical tool to outwit peers. They need to understand that quality, well-reviewed and hypothesis-based science has the opportunity to create a strong foundation for answering larger social challenges.

8. How can problem solving and solution-focused learning be used to overcome challenges?

 

Problem-solving is inherent to science, yet many educators overlook it in favor of either encouraging critical thinking through debate or sticking to rote facts. Meanwhile, many

Science, engineering and math can provide powerful tools for problem solving and thus boost self-reliance, confidence and competence in tomorrow’s adults.

students are deterred from science, seeing it as being too limited or too complex. Science, engineering and math can provide powerful tools for problem solving and thus boost self-reliance, confidence and competence in tomorrow’s adults.

 

9. How can we use connectivity with the global community to enhance our understanding?

Greater and faster connectivity through transportation, media and the Internet has already greatly accelerated the dispersal of information and skills as ideas are more easily shared over longer distances and shorter time periods. There are two key challenges to this connectivity, however. The first is ensuring that all communities have equal access to this global market of ideas. The second is ensuring that children are taught to discern quality information generated from trusted sources. Both increasing connectivity to all community members and encouraging thoughtful interpretation of material will strengthen children’s understanding of the world.

10. How can we use diplomacy to enact change?

If children today learn about the realities of providing for 8 billion people on Earth, who those people are, the ecosystems they impact, and how science can provide solutions to political, economic and environmental challenges, they can then use the greater connectivity of a global community to advance their understanding of — and enact — diplomatic decision making. By thoughtfully managing and cultivating international relationships, they will be able to facilitate just resolutions to the challenges that lie ahead while respecting all community members’ needs.

 

Very thought-provoking. Read more....


Via Jocelyn Stoller, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from Scriveners' Trappings
Scoop.it!

Learn how to make Citelighter Your Go-Tool for Teaching Writing ~ TeacherCast Blog

Learn how to make Citelighter Your Go-Tool for Teaching Writing ~ TeacherCast Blog | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it

by Natalie O'Neil


"Most teachers can empathize with the difficulty of teaching writing. You’ve likely experienced that hair-pulling moment after reading students’ unpolished, disorganized essays that lack support and analysis. And if you’re anything like me, you’ve  probably asked yourself, “What can I do to help my students become better writers?” For years, I searched for some way to beat the writing blues. I read books about teaching writing by folks like Stephen King, Karen Spear and Donald Murray but nothing changed: students still feared writing assignments, and I still struggled with teaching and grading them.


"But I was determined to find a way to make my students better writers, and even more determined to find a more effective way to guide them through the process.


"That’s when I turned to technology. I had been following a few edtech blogs and publications, and sure enough, among the latest digital writing trends, I found exactly what I was searching for: a free trial to a tool promising a solution to teaching writing. After an introduction to the platform, creating teacher and student accounts, I embarked on the greatest writing teacher journey of my career and invited an edtech startup to be our classroom writing guide. Citelighter, an all-inclusive digital writing platform, has had an unbelievably positive impact on my view of teaching writing. In particular, Citelighter has changed my teaching and my students’ writing in three profound ways."


Via Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

Book Review – Best Practices for Teaching with Emerging Technologies

Book Review – Best Practices for Teaching with Emerging Technologies | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it

By K. Walsh

 

"Teacher Michele Pacansky-Brock has written an excellent guide to bringing the teaching paradigm into the current century, in a way that embraces the perspective of students (of all ages) and has been proved effective time and time again.

"I could hardly envision a better introduction to using emerging technologies in the classroom in a single self-contained resource. While this book recounts a personal journey, it also very well organized, and provides structured guidance. These experienced insights can help guide any educator through the maze of Internet tools, to discover many ways in which they can facilitate a fundamental shift in student engagement and learning.

 

"While recovering from open-heart surgery in 2006, Instructor Michelle Pacansky-Brock started listening to educational podcasts during frequent walks, and was amazed at how much she learned from these early “Web 2.0” tools adopters and thought-leaders. She was inspired to experiment with the use of podcasts in her online course and this gradually led down the road to a wide variety of web-based tools and a learning journey of her own that resulted in significant changes to how she teaches today. The ultimate motivation behind these changes was the impact if had on the success of the students in her classes.

 

"Along the way, Pacansky-Brock was awarded a Sloan-C Excellence in Online Teaching Award, but far more meaningful was the positive feedback from many students whose learning experiences were transformed through participation in her classes. As a higher education teacher she encounters students of all ages and has found that with some personalized attention even older students who were intimidated by technology could ultimately embrace these tools and walk away proud of their new found skills."


Via Jim Lerman
more...
Andrew Blanco's curator insight, February 5, 2015 11:17 AM

book on how to merge technology for teachers in need

Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Are MOOCs Forever?

Are MOOCs Forever? | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
This is the latest episode of our new podcast series on the future of higher education. You can subscribe in iTunes, to get prior and future episodes.

Think back to the early days of MOOCs. Professors at Stanford and Harvard and other places were suddenly teaching really big classes, free. Hundreds of thousands of students at once were in those courses. It was an unprecedented giveaway of what had traditionally been the most expensive education in the world.

Back then, I met several students who were binging on the courses the way you might binge-watch a season of your favorite show on Netflix. They took as many courses as they possibly could, powering through and finishing as many as 30 courses in a year. When I asked why they were in such a hurry, the most popular reason was that they thought it was all too good to last. As one of those binging students told me, "I’m just afraid this whole thing might end soon." Surely, universities would change their mind about this, or the start-ups working with colleges might lock things up.


The New Education Landscape

The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Re:Learning project provides stories and analysis about this change moment for learning.

Sign up for our weekly newsletter
Join the discussion on Facebook
Listen to the podcast
Fast forward to last month, when Coursera did something that stirred up all of those concerns again. On June 30 the company deleted hundreds of its earliest courses, as part of a shift to a new software platform. Reaction, as you might expect, was negative on social media and blogs. One programmer called it cultural vandalism.
To be fair, many of the courses will actually be brought back on the new platform. For the company, the reason to upgrade was a philosophical shift, to offering courses that start on demand rather than just once or twice a year, as their early courses did. Coursera said it had found that completion rates were just better when people could start at their own convenience, but the episode did raise continuing concerns about the future of MOOCs. Will the free courses really stick around, and do MOOCs have staying power?

Hello, and welcome to The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Re:Learning Podcast. I’m Jeff Young, and I recently had the chance to talk with Daphne Koller, a co-founder of Coursera, about those issues. We sat down at the EdTechXEurope conference, in London.

First, a quick program note. This is a special bonus episode of our podcast, since we’re on summer break between seasons. We’ll be back on a more regular schedule starting in the fall.

Listen to the full audio. Below is an edited and adapted transcript of the podcast.

Q. Daphne, thank you for joining us today.

A. Thank you, Jeff.

Q. Obviously, MOOCs are a different conversation today than they were a few years ago. I’m curious. Some people out there are sort of like, "See. I told you so. The hype wasn’t as big." I know you were never the one saying a lot of the hype anyway, so.

A. That’s right.

Q. How would you describe the narrative now? What are MOOCs today, and where are they heading? What’s the arc of, maybe, what’s been learned from the early days, and where things are going?

A. Yeah. I found the hype in the early days to be somewhat laughable, and as well as the trough that came afterward. The first year was, "Oh, MOOCs are going to put universities out of business," which we never aimed for, nor endorsed. Twelve months later, it’s like, "Universities are still around. You fail." OK. Both of these were ridiculous points of view. I think what we’re seeing right now is that what we’re doing is providing access to an amazing educational experience, to a lot of people who, for diverse reasons, don’t have the opportunity to benefit from it. That includes people in developing countries, who might not have a well-established educational system, but also includes people like you and me, who want to learn something new, or need to learn something new because the skills that we need for our job have changed, and we’re not going to get a chance to go back to school.

Q. I have to ask. There was something I just saw in the last couple days about a little bit of grumbling about a change that Coursera’s making about some of the old original MOOCs, a large number, I think, of courses that are being taken down. You guys are making a change to the platform. Is this right, and what is your response to people who are complaining that this free resource that was there for a long time is going away?

A. First of all, there is a misunderstanding here. A lot of these courses will be migrated to the new platform. They just haven’t been yet, partly because there’s some changes that need to be made to the format to make them live on the new platform. We’re really excited about the new platform because, unlike the old one, where the courses were only live once or twice a year, here the courses are live all the time, so you can start the class pretty much every two weeks. There’s a new cohort launching, so that’s why we made that change.

Ramin Rahimian, The New York Times, Redux
Q. I know what you mean about some of the courses. They would be online sometimes and not online other times, effectively because if it wasn’t going, then you couldn’t look at it.

A. Yeah. Exactly, and now all courses are going to be going pretty much all the time, so yes, there’s a few hundred courses that we haven’t migrated yet. Most of those, not all of them, but most of them will be migrated soon.

Q. Most. OK.

A. Yeah. Some of them are obsolete, so for instance, if you taught a technology or a biology class three years ago, things have changed, and if the professor hasn’t had the time to update it, you probably don’t want it still up there. There’s some courses that will go away, but most of them will be migrated to the new platform.

Q. Yeah. I guess you’ve been around long enough that these are some of the interesting issues that end up coming up, like archiving. What is the appropriate role for the university and for Coursera to play in keeping things, and when do you refresh? Is there a commitment, or do you find yourself now thinking to make it more clear to people about what the guidelines are for you, about how long you keep something up, and when you refresh it or take it down?

A. I think that’s obviously largely up to the instructor. You can’t force somebody to update a course unless they want to, and the same way they can’t force someone to update a textbook unless they want to. It’s very similar in that respect. For courses that are very high demand, and where we actively solicit it for the university, that we provide resources to support in the creation, we do try and establish expectations on a reasonably frequent update schedule with the instruction. Again, if they say, No, I can’t do it, there’s still nothing you can do.

Q. What do you see for Coursera as the biggest challenge now? You’ve probably solved some, and new ones crop up. What is on your mind these days?

A. I think there’s still an awareness challenge. Even today, there was a Pew center study that shows, I think, that only 20 percent of professional Americans, so people who would be in our target demographic, only 20 percent are aware of MOOCs. I guess the other 80 percent don’t read The Chronicle of Higher Ed, or The New York Times, or The Wall Street Journal. I think it’s, how do you get to those people? Even more so, how do you get to those people in countries outside of the United States, where awareness is even lower, to let them know that this opportunity exists for them?

Q. I guess that is a question, because I obviously like people to read us and to read these other esteemed publications, but there’s other things that people do. Have you done bus ads, or are you thinking of other ways to get at people who have different media habits? How do you reach people who may benefit from MOOCs but not know about them?

A. That’s a really great question, and we now, only about a year and a half ago, we finally hired a marketing person who was thinking about this full time. We didn’t have one in the early days, but we have some partnerships that I think are really exciting. For instance, the one with Times Internet of India. They do billboards, and ads in traditional newspapers, including newspapers that our typical demographic hasn’t been reading, and so this was reaching out into a whole new demographic. I think that’s one direction. We’re doing partnerships with governments on work-force development. We found the ones that we’ve had, for instance, in Singapore, to be hugely impactful, both on the learners, but also on the work-force development needs in the country. I think that those are new channels that we’re exploring to reach new populations.


Re:Learning Podcast

The education landscape is changing. On The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Re:Learning podcast, you’ll meet the renegade teachers, ed-tech entrepreneurs, and longtime educators shaping the future of college. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Overcast, or wherever you get your podcasts.

This is part of our broader coverage of the future of education. For updates, follow the Re:Learning project on Twitter, Facebook, and iTunes.

Remember Second Life? Its Fans Hope to Bring VR Back to the Classroom
Why Georgetown's Randy Bass Wants to 'Rebundle' College
Why Audrey Watters Thinks Tech Is a Trojan Horse Set to ‘Dismantle’ the Academy
Q. There’s been a lot of talk about MOOCs as an experiment because you have these large student populations that have never been gathered before. At this point, now that it’s been a few years, what’s the most interesting or important thing you’ve learned from the MOOCs?

A. I think what we learned is the extent to which, once you have learners or students who know their own mind, what they’re looking for is so very different than the kind of experience that we’ve been providing on campus. They’re looking for shorter, more-to-the-point modules of knowledge. They’re looking for things that have direct relevance to problems that they’re trying to solve, and I think one of the transformations that we see when talking to instructors is first the realization that you can’t teach your MOOC students the same way you teach your on-campus students, because your MOOC students are going to just walk away and not complete the course.

They come to a point of view, it’s like, "OK, my campus students are different from my MOOC students." The next stage of their evolution is like, "No, they’re not actually different." It’s just that the MOOC students have the option to walk away, whereas your on campus students don’t, and maybe what we should be providing to our on campus students is actually more like what we’re providing to our MOOC students.

Q. That’s really interesting, and do you find that bleeding back into the college courses?

A. Absolutely. In fact, I think that we’re catalyzing an important transformation. There has long been this narrative around how universities are not providing the skills that employers feel they need in their incoming employees, but that communication channel has been hard to develop. How do you, as a university professor, learn what it is that industry really needs? Interestingly, by teaching the MOOC, you actually learn what people who are actively employed are looking for as part of their education. We also create direct relationships between top universities and top employers, so you now have that feedback loop that can help us make university teaching more relevant.

Q. One of the curious things is, you’ve had a growth of courses. A lot of universities have joined, and how many partners do you have now?

A. 145.

Q. That’s a lot of universities.

A. Teaching in 10 different languages, which is pretty cool.


Q. Are people building more courses? Are colleges that did a few courses to start off, have they learned that they’re largely happy with that amount, and keep that, or are they growing the number, or shrinking? What is the experience of your partners?

A. It varies. Most partners have produced a steady stream of courses that is maybe three, four, five new ones every year, where an instructor raises his or her hand, and is excited about the reach that this kind of opportunity gives them. We have a number of partners, I would say around 20 to 30, that have really embraced this deeply, and are now viewing this as a huge distribution channel for them in a variety of different ways, whether it’s to attract new students, whether it’s as a revenue generator, whether it’s as part of the online degrees that we’ve started to offer, and those are the ones that are really prolific contributors. Some of those are U.S. institutions, like U. Penn is an example, Michigan, University of Illinois, Stanford, but there’s also others, like UNAM in Mexico, or EPFL in Switzerland, the University of London, right here in the U.K., are all incredibly prolific producers of MOOCs and very high quality.

Q. Let’s talk for a minute about your own story. You were obviously an accomplished researcher before your interest in education technology happened at all, or your involvement in it, and you had won a MacArthur grant for your AI research. Do you ever look up and think, "How did I end up doing this?"

A. Yeah. Especially in the early days, it felt somewhat surreal. People used to ask me, "How are you feeling about your new life?" I used to say that it feels like the main character in the movie Being John Malkovich. It’s like I’m in someone else’s life. It’s not my life, but it’s kind of cool, so I’m going along with it. It’s a very different life, but it has very different opportunities for impact, and so I’m glad that I was able to play this role in catalyzing what I think is a huge transformation in education.

Q. Yeah, and you didn’t go back to Stanford, which I know that at the beginning, it was like, take a leave from Stanford, and go start this and maybe it’ll work out. Now you’re doing this. Do you ever think that in the future, you’ll be back to doing research, or is it not a thing you’re thinking about right now?

A. I think one of the things I learned through my Coursera journey is that you never know what the future might bring. If you’d asked me five years ago what I’d be, which is just before Coursera started, would I be doing this, it’s like, "No. I’m a Stanford professor." You don’t know what the future brings.

Q. Great. Thanks again for talking with us today. I really appreciate catching up.

A. Great. Thank you. Thanks, Jeff. Good to see you again.

Jeffrey R. Young writes about technology in education and leads the Re:Learning project. Follow him on Twitter @jryoung; check out his home page, jeffyoung.net; or try him by email at jeff.young@chronicle.com.

Join the conversation about this article on the Re:Learning Facebook page.

This article is part of:
Re:Learning Podcast, Mapping the New Education Landscape



Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from Educational Technology News
Scoop.it!

The 4 types of people MOOCs will affect

The 4 types of people MOOCs will affect | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it

"MOOCs will benefit learners off-campus who don't care about credentials, while replacing some for-credit options for students enrolled at universities... Employers who care more about specific skills than degrees as performance predictors may be interested in MOOCs for employees, while faculty will likely find ways to supplement their in-class teaching."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from Educational Technology News
Scoop.it!

Online Education Options Vary by More Than Cost

Online Education Options Vary by More Than Cost | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it

"When it comes to online education, there are a lot of different options with a lot of different price points. Prospective learners can choose between free massive open online courses, or MOOCs, that are not for credit, for instance, and for-credit courses, which can cost thousands of dollars."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dona Bernadette
Scoop.it!

21st Century Learners

A video presentation about the characteristics of 21st century learners and the potential challenges teachers would face teaching them. A presentation b
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from SteveB's Social Learning Scoop
Scoop.it!

10 Innovative Learning Strategies For Modern Pedagogy

10 Innovative Learning Strategies For Modern Pedagogy | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
10 Innovative Learning Strategies For Modern Pedagogy by TeachThought Staff This is an excerpt from a report, produced in collaboration with SRI International, that proposes ten innovations that are already in currency but have not yet had a profound influence on education.

Via Karen Bonanno, Miloš Bajčetić, stevebatch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

6 surprisingly simple ways to become a more confident writer | #Blogs #Blogging #Writing #Curation

6 surprisingly simple ways to become a more confident writer | #Blogs #Blogging #Writing #Curation | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
There’s an epidemic sweeping through the content writing industry. People are spending more time curating other people’s content than crafting their own original pieces. In a world where it’s easy to simply grab something from someone else and share it with your audience, you may be falling prey to this dangerous trend.

You may assume that convenience is the primary issue; however, a lack of confidence may be to blame.

How a lack of confidence hurts your writing
Confidence is a fickle thing. One minute, you can have all the confidence in the world and the next moment it’s gone. There are so many different factors in play and the average person has a pretty poor outlook on their potential.

“Often people think of confidence as something that the lucky few are born with and the rest are left wishing for. Not true,” business consultant Margie Warrell assures people. “Confidence is not a fixed attribute; it’s the outcome of the thoughts we think and the actions we take. No more; no less. It is not based on your actual ability to succeed at a task but your belief in your ability to succeed.”

When you look at writing, in particular, this means confidence isn’t tied to your talent as a writer, but in your belief that you can be successful. Once you look at it through this lens, it becomes apparent that a lack of confidence can have a tremendously negative impact on your efforts.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=blogs

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=curation

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, February 11, 9:37 AM
There’s an epidemic sweeping through the content writing industry. People are spending more time curating other people’s content than crafting their own original pieces. In a world where it’s easy to simply grab something from someone else and share it with your audience, you may be falling prey to this dangerous trend.

You may assume that convenience is the primary issue; however, a lack of confidence may be to blame.

How a lack of confidence hurts your writing
Confidence is a fickle thing. One minute, you can have all the confidence in the world and the next moment it’s gone. There are so many different factors in play and the average person has a pretty poor outlook on their potential.

“Often people think of confidence as something that the lucky few are born with and the rest are left wishing for. Not true,” business consultant Margie Warrell assures people. “Confidence is not a fixed attribute; it’s the outcome of the thoughts we think and the actions we take. No more; no less. It is not based on your actual ability to succeed at a task but your belief in your ability to succeed.”

When you look at writing, in particular, this means confidence isn’t tied to your talent as a writer, but in your belief that you can be successful. Once you look at it through this lens, it becomes apparent that a lack of confidence can have a tremendously negative impact on your efforts.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=blogs

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=curation

 

Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

How to Use YouTube Video Essays in the Classroom by Tanner Higgin

How to Use YouTube Video Essays in the Classroom by Tanner Higgin | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
By Tanner Higgin

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dona Bernadette
Scoop.it!

Teaching 21st Century Learners with Mobile Devices

Teaching 21st Century Learners with Mobile Devices Jozenia Colorado, Ph.D. Emporia State University EdMedia Conference …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dona Bernadette
Scoop.it!

Co-Learning: Modeling Cooperative-Collaborative Learning

Co-Learning: Modeling Cooperative-Collaborative Learning | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
Howard Rheingold reflects on a decade of co-learning activities in his own classroom as well as in the classrooms of other educators, who exemplify connected learning practice.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dona Bernadette
Scoop.it!

Top Barriers for Not Using Tech in The Classroom –

Top Barriers for Not Using Tech in The Classroom – | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
Something became clear to me at AISA Conference 2017 when keynote speaker, Dr. Sonny Magana, asked the educators in the audience to raise their hands if they felt content about the state of educational technology in their schools. For a brief moment a room full of educators from a variety of schools, backgrounds, and teaching positions was…
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from vwmiktl
Scoop.it!

Benefits of using videos in the classroom pdf


Download Benefits of using videos in the classroom pdf:
http://rbv.cloudz.pw/download?file=benefits+of+using+videos+in+the+classroom+pdf


Read Online Benefits of using videos in the classroom pdf:
http://rbv.cloudz.pw/read?file=benefits+of+using+videos+in+the+classroom+pdf





using video clips in the classroom
 
effective use of videos in the classroom
 
using video in education
 
using videos in the classroom best practices
 
use of videos in teaching and learning pdf
 
using educational video in the classroom: theory, research and practice
 
advantages of using video in teaching and learning
 
disadvantages of using videos in the classroom
 

 

 

This Expert Guide was created to look at the problems and offer solutions in integrating video into your classroom. After reading benefits and results that the research has already shown. We hope . Finding, Choosing and Using school videos and multi media in your classroom lessons will improve your goal of increas-.
 There are many benefits to using video in education as shown in several decades of research. Salman Khan in 'Let's use video to reinvent education' (20 mins) describes the transformative way video can impact on teaching and learning and encourages teachers to consider the flipped classroom model where learners can
 Nowadays, a new concept called “low-cost educational video” has been defined as a short demonstration stream use of videos as an innovative teaching tool, this paper is aimed at exploring the effect of the use of videos for . The lecturer summarized the benefits of using low cost educational videos in a very suggestive
 For a number of reasons, learning from video can be superior to learning using text or learning in a classroom: ? The Experience: Watching a video beats reading lessons or attending a long and boring lecture. It's often much more effective than both. ? The Rewind and Forward Button: Have you ever been in a class where
 1.1 Introduction. The Inholland research group (lectoraat) Teaching, Learning & Technology1 conduct research into the relationship between, teaching, learning and technology and the on-going developments in this area. As part of this research the group are focusing on the use of video in higher education. The following.
 9 Jul 2014 benefits and challenges associated with the use of videos in the teaching and learning process at educational technology companies such as Coursera, Udacity, EdX, Khan Academy are using them as a main of .. United States”, Retrieved from: www.onlinelearningsurvey.com/reports/gradechange.pdf.
 How to Effectively Use Video in the Classroom · GUIDE · CBC Learning | Curio.ca 1. How to Use Video understanding of how to prepare and implement productive lessons using video. When To Use Video One of the greatest benefits to using video in the classroom is the conversation that comes out of viewing an
 28 Feb 2014 Providing rich interactive multimedia is a key feature of cloud learning at Deakin. It enables students to access resources that support learning wherever they are; without the need to attend a specific location at a defined time. The use of audio and video also makes it possible to present knowledge in.
 Using audio-visual materials in the classroom is nothing new. . However, video also benefits auditory learners, with its inclusion of sound and speech, and can .. Between the Lions: Mississippi Literacy Initiative final report. Available: pbskids.org/lions/parentsteachers/program/research/pdf/BTL-. Mississippi.pdf.
 8 Apr 2014 What are the learning objectives & goals for using video as opposed to other presentation formats? Why am I using video, what is the need? What are the benefits and risks? What ideas can I effectively convey in a video? Be clear and explicit regarding the learning objective for a video, and eliminate
    
http://dayviews.com/bugsoln/524774306/, http://eftgwla.bloggersdelight.dk/2018/03/02/hitchhikers-guide-to-the-galaxy-toys/, http://telegra.ph/La-mision-del-embajador-pdf-03-02, javascript:void(0), http://telegra.ph/Damascus-patterns-tutorial-03-02.

Via vwmiktl
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

The Early Results Of An iPad Classroom Are In. - Edudemic

The Early Results Of An iPad Classroom Are In. - Edudemic | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it

 

By Fred Sitkins

 

"My daily PLN reading seems to be full of stories about how to use iPads in the classroom. While this is certainly important information, I believe our Twitter feeds could use a few more stories about the positive impact the introduction of iPads are having in schools.

 

"Our school has been working with iPads for three years now and I can easily say that these have been the most exciting years of my educational career.While the decision to share these positive results is a direct result of the positive impact on student learning, it is also important to realize the impact this initiative is having with teachers. I’ve observed the collective knowledge base of our teachers grow at a rate that far exceeds any other period of time in my 13-years at this school.

 

"I’ve never observed anything else that has had the impact on teacher personal learning like the introduction of the iPad.

 

"Our focus over this three year period has been to define what it means to teach in a way that allows students to learn differently as a result of this incredible influx of technology. While this project has probably been one of the most difficult things I’ve had to lead as a principal, the changes I’ve observed in teaching style as a result of this project is likely the most amazing thing I will ever have the privilege of being a part of."

 

"I see teachers learning more each day about what it means to become a facilitator of student learning. I see teachers who understand that students have access to unlimited numbers and types of educational resources and teachers that allow students to take more control of their learning. I’m fortunate enough to work with educators that understand our role is more about developing students that know how to learn than it is about filling their heads with rote knowledge.

 

"I believe that the most successful of the students we are educating today will be those that can find information the fastest and know best what to do with that information. I am simply blown away at the impact this initiative has had on the way our teachers teach and the way students learn."


Via Nik Peachey, Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from Educational Technology News
Scoop.it!

Big trends in digital education: The MOOC is in session

Big trends in digital education: The MOOC is in session | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it

"As course providers like edX, Coursera and others look to offer more rigorous, certificate programmes, university-compatible credits, and specializations tailored for industry, Indians are beginning to see not just knowledge, but better career prospects in MOOCs. In Coursera's first-ever learner outcome survey in September, it emerged that 53% of the 2,076 Indian online learners polled were looking for career-building benefits, while 35% sought to further their education."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from Learning & Technology News
Scoop.it!

How Big Data is Being Used to Shape the Digital Classroom

How Big Data is Being Used to Shape the Digital Classroom | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
MOOCs have been one of the major users of data to help learners learn better. For example, Udacity uses individual feedback. Feedback can also be offered to teachers to help them to improve. On Coursera, teachers are able to see data that indicates when students are most likely to stop watching their lessons on video, and how many students get questions right first time. This can help the teacher to see how and where they could be more effective in presenting information to help students learn.

Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 23, 2016 12:37 AM

Worth reading if you are interested in how data collection can impact on learning.

Carlos Fosca's curator insight, July 23, 2016 9:11 AM

Ejemplos muy interesantes de como la tecnología y el análisis de la Big Data están siendo utilizadas para entender y mejorar el aprendizaje de los estudiantes.

Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from Educational Technology News
Scoop.it!

Online learning at school helps prepare teens for university

Online learning at school helps prepare teens for university | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it

"Online learning has been around for more than 30 years, but recent excitement around Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) has brought it fully into the public eye. In schools, online learning used to be a remedial alternative to classroom teaching, particularly where learners were geographically dispersed. But there is a growing belief that it might offer all students some distinct experiences that can prepare them for higher education."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from dhdtrds
Scoop.it!

Essentials of the english language pdf


Download Essentials of the english language pdf:
http://wnu.cloudz.pw/download?file=essentials+of+the+english+language+pdf


Read Online Essentials of the english language pdf:
http://wnu.cloudz.pw/read?file=essentials+of+the+english+language+pdf





essential english grammar book pdf free download
 
essentials of english grammar pdf
 
essential english grammar 2nd edition pdf
 
essential english grammar 2nd edition raymond murphy pdf
 
the essentials of english a writer's handbook pdf
 
essentials of english pdf
 
essentials of english grammar by raymond murphy
 
essential english book 2 download
 

 

 

10 Jun 2015 The Iowa Core Essential Elements (EEs) are specific statements of knowledge and skills linked to the grade-level expectations identified in the Iowa Core Standards. The purpose of the EEs is to build a bridge from the content in the Iowa Core Standards to academic expectations for students with the most
 Grammar essentials—3rd ed. p. cm. Rev. ed. of: Grammar essentials / Judith F. Olson, 2nd ed. c2000. ISBN 1-57685-541-4. 1. English language—Grammar—Handbooks, manuals, etc. I. LearningExpress (Organization) II. Title. PE1112.O43 2006. 428.2—dc22. 2006000600. Printed in the United States of America. 9 8 7 6 5
 Foreword. In June 2010, Wisconsin adopted the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts and The Wisconsin Common Core Essential Elements for English Language Arts would not have been possible without the efforts of many people. .. www.ccsso.org/content/pdfs/AccommodationsManual.pdf .
 concerned with the development of language, literacy and communication. Curriculum and Assessment in English 3 to 19: A Better Plan. The Essentials of English. owenEDUCATION. The United Kingdom Literacy Association. ISBN EPUB 978 1 910543 702. ISBN MOBI 978 1 910543 719. ISBN PDF 978 1 910543 726
 The essentials of English language teaching/Julian Edge. p. cm. – (Longman keys to language teaching). Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-582-02565-6. 1. English language — Study and teaching -. Foreign speakers. 2. English language — Study and teaching. I. Titie. II. Series. PE1128.A2E275 1993. 428.007 –
 “If you approve, headmaster, I will stay as I am here as long as any boy wants to read the classics. I think it would be very wicked indeed to do anything to fit a boy for the modern world.” “It's a short-sided view, Scott-King.” “There, headmaster, with all respect, I differ from you profoundly. I think it the most long-sighted view.
 Your essential resource for the English language. Available exclusively through the Classical Conversations Essentials program (4th-6th grade). In our exclusive language study program, Essentials of the English Language (EEL), students learn sentence patterns and structures, the
 Essentials for Successful English Language Teaching (review). Callie Mady. The Canadian Modern Language Review / La revue canadienne des langues vivantes, Volume 67, Number 2, May / mai 2011, pp. 273-275 (Review). Published by University of Toronto Press. For additional information about this article.
 21 Dec 2015 Full-text (PDF) | Essentials of English Grammar | ResearchGate, the professional network for scientists.
 Expression, suppression, and impression.—Prescriptive, descriptive, explanatory, historical, appreciative grammar.—Purpose and plan of this grammar. 1.11. Grammar deals with the structure of languages, English grammar with the structure of English, French grammar with the structure of French, etc. Language consists of.
    
http://forum.us.kick9.com/viewtopic.php?f=46&t=2040381, http://mentorshiponline.com/m/feedback/view/Minute-brown-rice-cups-cooking-instructions, http://dqmmtog.clicforum.com/t69-Algebra-lineare-lang-pdf.htm, http://hmglqlx.soup.io/post/645123082/A-first-course-in-bayesian-statistical-methods, http://telegra.ph/Manual-de-soldadura-oerlikon-02-14.

Via dhdtrds
Dona Bernadette's insight:
The findings of the article 'Essentials of the English Language' is very relevant in my context, overall to the 21st century teaching and learning.  
It focuses mainly on two aspects of English teaching and learning, i.e. grammar and writing.  Both are two key skills that most of the students struggle with when learning English Language.
With this kind of support by OERs, learners in any part of the world could improve and extend their time of learning English at any time anywhere outside the classroom without any cost.
Furthermore, the links provided to online essentials like English grammar and writing are challenging and provoking the learners to have more interest and enthuse towards learning the subject.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

7 Meaningful Classroom Engagement Strategies for Student Connection by Lee Watanabe-Crockett (Good teaching always starts with good relationships!)

7 Meaningful Classroom Engagement Strategies for Student Connection by Lee Watanabe-Crockett  (Good teaching always starts with good relationships!) | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
by Lee Watanabe-Crockett

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
Valeria Garcia Lopez's curator insight, February 19, 7:39 AM
The strategies that are mentioned in this article are very useful for us to apply in the classrooms. It is important to connect ourselves with students because in that way we are going to have a better learning and teaching environment. Doing warm up activities, showing students that we care about them, and helping them with any problems they may have are some ways to start constructing that connection between teachers and students. If we apply the suggestions this article gives us, we will become XXI century teachers with great values. 
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from SteveB's Social Learning Scoop
Scoop.it!

10 Innovative Learning Strategies For Modern Pedagogy

10 Innovative Learning Strategies For Modern Pedagogy | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
10 Innovative Learning Strategies For Modern Pedagogy by TeachThought Staff This is an excerpt from a report, produced in collaboration with SRI International, that proposes ten innovations that are already in currency but have not yet had a profound influence on education.

Via Karen Bonanno, Miloš Bajčetić, stevebatch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

8 New EdTech Tools for Teachers via Educators' Technology

8 New EdTech Tools for Teachers via Educators' Technology | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Dona Bernadette's insight:
This article grabbed my attention to stop and read.  The contents, tools and tips make the educators stronger to  challenge the 21st century learners.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dona Bernadette from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

3 Great Ways to Power Up Your Parent Communication via Common Sense Media

3 Great Ways to Power Up Your Parent Communication via Common Sense Media | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
Technology News & Innovation in K-12 Education

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dona Bernadette
Scoop.it!

Ten Top Things Everyone Should Know about Teachers and Digital Learning: Speak Up 2016 Findings, November 2017

Ten Top Things Everyone Should Know about Teachers and Digital Learning: Speak Up 2016 Findings, November 2017 | Challenging 21st century learner | Scoop.it
California teachers’ views and experience with educational technology and digital learning in the classroom, 2016.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dona Bernadette
Scoop.it!

Impact of mass communication on Education

Impact of mass communication on education Dr J Balamurugan
more...
No comment yet.