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Libraries in the 21st century: the struggle between perception and reality | IB Community Blog

Libraries in the 21st century: the struggle between perception and reality | IB Community Blog | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it

Librarians make libraries “loveable!” (Photo submitted by Carole Mondin, then at American International School of Lagos, Nigeria)


It speaks volumes when the man in charge of the world’s fourth-biggest public library insists digital technologies are an opportunity rather than a threat to libraries. In an interview with Forbes Magazine, Anthony W Marx, president of New York Public Library, countered fears that they were dying:

There are people who think that the Digital Age is a mortal threat to the library. I think it’s the greatest opportunity in the history of libraries, and that means that this institution of huge scale and beloved by millions of people is also at a moment of revitalizing itself fundamentally. In my line of work, that’s an unbeatable combination.

In truth, libraries and librarians have fundamentally changed but not everyone has noticed. Those with the privilege of internet access have the ability to find every sort of information offered on the web. Much of modern global culture has been captured into bits and bytes of data, then packaged for consumption to suit every preference. The internet in these ways seems very similar to a library, or at least a repository of information, distributed on a global scale but accessed locally. However, the presence of the internet has obscured the library, making many unaware of how it has evolved, what makes it different, and why it is so important to co-exist with the internet.

Dr Marx points out this distinction:

The library is misunderstood as a repository of books. The library is a repository of information, and a sharing, and providing of access to information, and guide to using it.

Many librarians see collaboration as the most impactful aspect of their work.  The internet is no doubt a giant resource, but it does not guide creativity and understanding—it is designed to reflect preferences rather than needs. Algorithms, bots and social media tracking filter and package information based on searches but they do not highlight information that helps us to learn and grow in understanding. Humans still need to research, analyze, and ultimately decide on complex, difficult issues. Internet sources are not usually designed to assist in doing these things. In fact, they can negatively affect our judgment and restrict what we do depending on how the information is packaged.


Via Trudy Raymakers
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The Library Lifecycle - NEA Today

The Library Lifecycle - NEA Today | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
From young children at story hour to retirees learning second career job skills, the library “ecosystem” serves the needs of our community members throughout their lives. NEA Today spoke with John Chrastka, Executive Director of EveryLibrary — the only national organization dedicated to building voter support for libraries by promoting public, school, and college libraries — to talk the ecosystem about school and public library partnerships.

What is the library “ecosystem” and how do the parts work together?

John Chrastka: The ecosystem includes different ages and stages of people using public, school, and university and college libraries. It has no beginning or end. In Pre-K, public libraries play with parents and care givers as a place for stories and music and movement as well as play. The children’s librarian at a public library is one of the first educators for our children. As children enter elementary school, the school library along with the public library supports children learning to read and reading to learn. The wraparound of literacy support continues throughout the school year and break time

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3 Ways to Connect STEAM With Literacy in Your Library

3 Ways to Connect STEAM With Literacy in Your Library | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
Library Journal’s Maker Hero School Librarian of the Year shares three STEAM activities you can use to integrate robotics and coding into English class.

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The World's Most Zen Library

The World's Most Zen Library | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it

This cast-concrete library sits on a stretch of deserted beach facing the East China Sea and features a tiered reading hall, a meditation space, activity room, and bar topped by a curving ceiling.

 Not much can be asked from a library. Silence appears second-nature in a space where serenity and zen is embedded in the environment. According to the architects, when walking into the space, one starts to feel the light, breezes, and sound of the ocean. In there, everyone can slow down the usual pace, and unfold the feeling of distance and loneliness different from the city life. It’s officially a dream.


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Five Laws of Library Science

Five Laws of Library Science | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it

FIVE LAWS OF LIBRARY SCIENCE ➨ The 5 Laws of Library Science is a theory proposed by S. R. Ranganathan in 1931, detailing the principles of operating a library system. Five laws of library science are called the set of norms, percepts, and guides to good practice in librarianship. Many librarians worldwide accept them as the foundations of their philosophy. Dr. S.R. Ranganathan conceived the Five Laws of Library Science in 1924. The statements embodying these laws were formulated in 1928. These laws were first published in Ranganathan's classic book entitled Five Laws of Library Science in 1931.

These laws are:
Books are for use.
Every reader his / her book.
Every book its reader.
Save the time of the reader.
The library is a growing organism.

These laws of Library Science are the "fundamental laws" of Library Science. These are applicable to any problem in the areas of library science, library service, and library practice. These laws are like pot containing oceans. Prior to their enunciation, the subject of Library Science had no philosophy. These laws gave a philosophical base, guaranteeing an everlasting future to the subject of library science, the profession of librarianship, and the use of libraries. These laws have provided a scientific approach to the subject of library science. Even though S.R. Ranganathan proposed the Five Laws of Library Science before the advent of the digital age, they are still valid and equally relevant today. 


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Trudy Raymakers's curator insight, November 19, 2017 3:13 AM
Salman Haider describes the working of the laws in modern times.
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Libraries are as relevant as ever

Libraries are as relevant as ever | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it

My two days attending the Internet Librarian conference in Monterey last week reminded me of something that a lot of people already know. Despite predictions that they would be rendered obsolete by technology, libraries remain a vital part of our communities.

If anything, they’re more important than ever as I reminded attendees when I addressed the group. Libraries encourage and help satisfy curiosity and the search for truth and meaning. Along with schools, the arts and the news media, they offer our citizens not just knowledge, but entertainment, understanding and the critical thinking skills we need to make good personal and collective decisions in how we live our lives and govern our collective selves.

Jane Cowell's insight:
The relevance of libraries has been hotly debated in 2017. - good to see evidence that libraries still provide significant impact in communities 
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What exactly are libraries for?

What exactly are libraries for? | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
From libraries without books, like the songlines of the first Australians, to the library of Alexandria, the Bodleian, the Folger, and even the fabled libraries of Middle-earth and Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose, my new book The Library: A Catalogue of Wonders unlocks the bookish places that continue to capture our imaginations.

What exactly are libraries for? Scores of rationales have been put forward; scores of stories have been told. Libraries are an attempt to impose order in a world of chaos. They are signifiers of power (consider the libraries of Mesopotamian kings and American presidents) and prestige (remember the libraries of America's robber barons). They are an aide-mémoire of the species, a network of sanctuaries, a civilising influence in the New World, places of solace and education, sources of nourishment for the human spirit, cultural staging posts in which new arrivals can be inducted into their adopted countries. They are places for social connection and the creation of "social capital". They are places in which to give birth. They are places of redemption.

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The Library of the Future

The New Taipei City Library is a hub of innovation and learning. Spanning floors and generations as well as offering a unique reading and learning experience for people from all walks of life, this library of the future has something for everyone!

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Belonging, and libraries as empathy engines?

Belonging, and libraries as empathy engines? | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
The discussion was based around the question “What does it mean to belong in Australia ?”. Tim Costello was CEO of World Vision and writes about equity issues. Isabelle Li was born in China, but came to Australia voluntarily to resettle in 1999 after living for five years in Singapore. Abdi Aden was a Somalian refugee who came to Melbourne at 17 and now works as a youth worker.

The most library-relevant part of the talk was Isabelle Li describing her annoyance at being asked “but how could you understand what it was about?” when she revealed that she had read Dicken’s David Copperfield several times as a teen because she loved it so much; the presumption being that a 20th Century young woman in China would not have anything in common with a young lad in Victorian times. But, “of COURSE I could empathise with the characters. That’s the POINT of literature”.

It made me think of libraries, particularly public libraries, as “empathy peddlars”. By providing a wide range of literature, much of it people would not come across for themselves, do we provide more chance for people to put themselves in each others’ shoes? Do our programmes for such a wide cross section of the community give people exposure to ideas and people that they would otherwise avoid ? Does the common purpose of using wifi or a comfy workspace, and the fact that NO ONE IS FORCED TO BE THERE, mean that people get to understand that other people  with whom they think they have nothing in common, actually make similar choices to themselves?

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Future Ready Librarian

Future Ready Librarian | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it

The 7 Gears of the Future Ready Schools Framework are as follows: 1.Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment 

2. Personalized Professional Learning 

3. Robust Infrastructure 

4. Data and Privacy 

5. Community Partnerships 

6. Budget and Resources 

7. Use of Space and Time.

Future Ready Librarians 

Future Ready Librarians is an expansion of the Future Ready initiative aimed at raising awareness among district and school leaders about the valuable role librarians can play in supporting the Future Ready goals of their school and district. Two guiding questions are central to Future Ready Librarians. How can librarians and libraries support Future Ready schools? How can librarians and libraries become more Future Ready? Future Ready Librarians will provide resources, strategies and connections for district leaders and librarians to be able to work together to promote and implement innovative learning opportunities for students.

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The Makerspace - MODEL PROGRAMME FOR PUBLIC LIBRARIES

The Makerspace - MODEL PROGRAMME FOR PUBLIC LIBRARIES | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it

The makerspace at Vordingborg Library. Denmark – a young man is absorbed in exercises from the text book to the library’s Arduino kit. Photo: www.mh-foto.nu.


Today, knowledge is easily accessible and highly digital. But interest in the more tangible and analogue form of knowledge, for instance the sort that can be practised in a makerspace, is also growing. In a makerspace, you can create, learn, be motivated and puzzled, and the concept attracts users of all ages and backgrounds in a technology-based community.

The term makerspace is used broadly to indicate a workshop 'where you create'. In a makerspace, you can learn by creating, experimenting with machines, and developing ideas into finished products. The users get to play and engage with the machines on their own. The staff provides help and guidance when needed, but the actual performance is done by the users.
A makerspace can attract people who would not normally frequent a library. At Ballerup Library, for instance, the establishment of a makerspace has led to a significant increase in the number of male visitors, in addition to children, entrepreneurs, artists, senior citizens, technology enthusiasts, schoolchildren etc.

If you consider setting up a makerspace at your library, it is worth considering a number of things, e.g.:
Is the makerspace to be set up in a room of its own, or should it be placed centrally along with other activities?
What machinery, materials and prices do you want to be able to offer?
Who is to man the makerspace, know the machinery and help the users get started?
What activities do you want to hold in the makerspace area?
Do you want a makerspace or, more specifically, a fab lab?
 A fab lab is a special type of makerspace, where the library joins a community, subjecting itself to a specific framework for the content of the workshop. Both solutions have advantages and disadvantages, but the more general makerspace solution provides the widest possible framework for working creatively with the concept and designing it as a real library option.

In Aars Library in Vesthimmerland, Denmark, is the makerspace located in the large library room, which makes it more visible for the users. The makerspace was earlier located in the back of the library behind large bookcases. The staff experiences a big rise in activity, in the makerspace now with its new location, central and visible in the library. A makerspace does not have to take up an entire room, but can be placed in a rather small area.

Jane Cowell's insight:
Making & creating are integral to learning & essential for libraries in today's society
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Mecanoo offers fly-through preview of Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington DC

Mecanoo offers fly-through preview of Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington DC | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
World Architecture Community News - Mecanoo offers fly-through preview of Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington DC

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Teachers - digital literacy and school librarians. Innovation at it's best!

Teachers - digital literacy and school librarians. Innovation at it's best! | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
A blog about school libraries and the role of the librarian in teaching and learning. Why information literacy is important.
Via Karen Bonanno
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Elizabeth Hutchinson's comment, January 14, 2017 1:58 AM
Thanks Karen, for sharing my blog!
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How public libraries are reinventing themselves for the 21st century

How public libraries are reinventing themselves for the 21st century | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it

On any given day, in one of the world’s busiest urban library systems, 50,000 people come through the doors of the Toronto Public Library’s 100 branches, while 85,000 make an online visit. The walk-ins bring their coffee and their lunches; they talk and watch TV while charging their phones; they do their homework, often via thousands of computer sessions; they make videos or create objects with 3D printers; take classes in computer coding or yoga; attend author talks or listen to experts offer advice for those looking after elderly relatives; access video tutorials on everything from website design to small business management from Lynda.com (an American online education giant that offers 3,600 courses taught by industry experts). Together with their online fellows, they borrow musical instruments, passes to the city’s art galleries and museums, WiFi hotspots, lamps that battle seasonal affective disorder, Raspberry Pis (small, single-board computers primarily used for coding training), DVDs, more than 12,000 ebooks and—of course—plain old print-and-ink books, a good 90,000 of them every day. All at no cost.


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s.pierros's curator insight, January 31, 6:52 AM
To Τορόντο έχει πληθυσμό περίπου 3 εκατομμύρια και η Δημόσια Βιβλιοθήκη του Τορόντο το 2016 ξόδεψε [https://goo.gl/vAhDbS] περίπου 195 εκατομμύρια δολάρια Καναδά (περισσότερο από 120 εκατομμύρια ευρώ) - περίπου 40 ευρώ ανά κάτοικο. 


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Libraries Find New Ways to Flourish in the Digital Age

Libraries Find New Ways to Flourish in the Digital Age | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
Modern learners seek flexible spaces and guidance on digital literacy.

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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, January 14, 2:16 AM
We already knew this didn't we :) 
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Designing Libraries - James B. Hunt Jr. Library, NCSU

Designing Libraries - James B. Hunt Jr. Library, NCSU | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it

Versatile, stimulating and technology-focused
Libraries have evolved dramatically in recent years, moving away from introverted spaces lined with shelves, to more vibrant social and collaborative spaces, with allocated spaces for reflection. The Hunt Library at North Carolina State University serves as a comfortable living room for students as well as their intellectual base-camp on the campus.

A contemporary structure within a traditional context, the Hunt Library provides a forward-thinking platform for influencing its surroundings. Both technical and programmatic innovations are celebrated as part of the learning experience and provide a versatile and stimulating environment for the user.

Generous open spaces connect all floors of the library and open stairs emphasize an interactive and social environment alongside more focused study areas. A wide variety of study and learning environments and technology-focused experimental labs go beyond the now ubiquitous model of the learning commons. “Disruptive” learning spaces with colourful, dynamic furnishings exist adjacent to more traditional study rooms.

The building’s design recognizes the power of chance encounters and celebrates the role physical space plays in the intellectual stimulation of its users. Technology zones are integrated throughout the Library. Interactive digital surfaces and HD video display screens deliver both programmed and live-feed information. The Game Lab serves as a testing lab for video game design.



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Librarians as Social Media Curators

For librarians, social media curation is a translation of mission and traditional practice. It’s about getting users/patron/students/faculty to the goo

Via Karen Bonanno
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Great video on the role of #librarians as Digital Information curators & ability to amplify learning 
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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, November 28, 2017 1:32 AM
A great reminder of what a school librarian can do if given the chance. 
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, November 28, 2017 1:31 PM

Curation and Library science go hand in hand.  

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Fayetteville Public Library launches movie and TV hotspot devices

Fayetteville Public Library launches movie and TV hotspot devices | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
Library patrons can now check out a hotspot device that can stream movies and TV shows anytime and anywhere without the need for an internet connection.

Officials this month announced the introduction of GoChip Beam devices into the library’s collections as a new way for lending entertainment options. Each device contains a small Wi-Fi router with a rechargeable battery, and comes preloaded with either five feature-length movies or an entire season of a television series.

After downloading an app and connecting to the GoChip Wi-Fi signal, up to eight simultaneous users can stream the movies or TV shows. Supported devices include Apple and Android mobile phones and tablets, as well as Mac and Windows laptops and desktop computers.

“We are excited to be one of the first libraries in the United States, and the first in Arkansas, to provide this great new technology,” said Heather Robideaux, the library’s manager of adult services. “Allowing cardholders access to content in new and convenient ways is part of our overall mission. We’re certain the GoChip devices will be a big hit with our patrons.”
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Library collections expanding to include devices to ensure eResources can be accessed by everyone
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Why you're probably reading the wrong books — and missing the point

Why you're probably reading the wrong books — and missing the point | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
If we limit our reading to books by writers who resemble ourselves, aren't we missing the point, asks Nicola Heath.

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Trudy Raymakers's curator insight, September 26, 2017 11:23 PM
Check it and correct if if so. Libraries need to check on bias too.
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A lawyer rewrote Instagram’s terms of use ‘in plain English’ so kids would know their privacy rights

A lawyer rewrote Instagram’s terms of use ‘in plain English’ so kids would know their privacy rights | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it

Amy B. Wang writes: "It’s no secret that teenagers love social media.

 

Members of “Generation Z” can spend up to nine hours a day sharing photos on Instagram, consuming “content” on YouTube and talking to friends on Snapchat. (Just don’t ask them to get excited about Facebook.)

 

But how much do these teens understand what they’ve agreed to give up when they start an account with those sites?

 

Probably very little, according to a report released last week — and dense terms and conditions that are “impenetrable and largely ignored” are partly to blame."


Via Mary Reilley Clark
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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, January 8, 2017 3:44 PM

Be sure to click on the report to see the rewritten terms and conditions. Do your students understand all their DMs are mined by Instagram (and do they care?) 

GwynethJones's curator insight, January 8, 2017 4:41 PM

This is super cool!

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FUTURISTIC LIBRARY IN MEXICO CITY | Eileen Aldis

One of the coolest things to see in Mexico City is a futuristic library called Biblioteca Vasconcelos. It reminds me of something from a sci-fi novel or film. I gasped when I first saw it and it just got more and more incredible the further in I went. The architecture is stunning and unique, like no place I've ever seen before. It was designed by Alberto Kalach and opened in 2007 after three consecutive years of building. There are over half a million books spread out over 38,000 square metres or 409,000 square feet. It's called a 'mega library' because it's actually five libraries melded into one. There are tons of places to sit and work, free wifi, courses and workshops, as well as other community events like free concerts. Don't miss the balconies that give you fantastic views of the Zocalo of Mexico City. If you're a book lover like me or enjoy seeing outstanding architecture, Biblioteca Vasconcelos should not be missed! It's one of the most memorable and favourite places I visited.

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Why Gen Z needs librarians now more than ever

Why Gen Z needs librarians now more than ever | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
Whether guiding research or introducing new tech, today’s librarian gives Gen Z the skills they need to move from ‘getting it right now’ to ‘getting it right.’

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
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Essential for Gen Z is Digital citizenship and how to assess fake information 
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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, April 25, 2017 9:36 AM
I love the byline that says "today's librarian gives Gen Z the skills they need to move from 'getting it right now' to 'getting it right.'" I couldn't have said it better myself. We have always been the champions of accurate, relevant, current, and valid resources and, in today's world, that cause is more important than it's ever been. The next time someone asks why we need libraries in the age of Google, I'm going to quote some of the statements in this article! Enjoy.
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Picture Books and Ideas to Inspire Young Inventors | Knowledge Quest

Picture Books and Ideas to Inspire Young Inventors | Knowledge Quest | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
Thomas Edison once said, “To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk.” Supplying children with junk in the library is easy to do, but how can the library inspire children to invent something interesting and useful? Why... Read More ›

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Creating young makers. - access to junk & imagination
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Carol Koechlin's curator insight, March 14, 2017 4:51 PM
Discovery Learning in the LC
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Do Libraries Need Ebooks? - Digital Book World

Do Libraries Need Ebooks? - Digital Book World | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it
At the American Library Association’s mid-winter meeting in Seattle last week, discussion swirled around libraries and ebooks – as it has in the library community for several years now.
 
Access to ebooks for patrons is still a high priority and librarians are “frustrated with the pace of change,” according to Sari Feldman, executive director of the Cuyahoga County (Ohio) Public Library and co-chair of ALA’s Digital Content & Libraries Working Group. Librarians are also unhappy with library ebook licenses that are limiting or when ebooks are more expensive for libraries to purchase and the “ALA anticipates that continued, or stepped up, advocacy will be necessary in 2013.” So look forward to that.

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Digital requires libraries to rethink delivery - radical collaboration between libraries needed
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How libraries became the locus of creative building design in Canada

How libraries became the locus of creative building design in Canada | 21st Century Libraries | Scoop.it

The new Waterdown Library and Civic Centre in Hamilton is proof that libraries are the locus of creative building design in Canada

Imagine a slab: a low box clad in limestone and glass. Then place it on the crest of a hill and split it down the middle, one piece pressed down into the earth and the other slanting up to the sky. This is the three-dimensional drama that animates the new Waterdown Library and Civic Centre in Hamilton.

Inside, more twists. Walk in the door, and you can wind your way to the top of the hill: climbing a series of ramps lined with generous windows and slats of Douglas fir, past green roofs and through six levels of a library filled with colour and dashed with sunlight on all sides. At the top, the payoff: long views from the height of the Niagara Escarpment, taking your eye beyond the suburban road to the broad topography that defines this place, the arcing shore of an ancient sea.

The latest in a string of excellent public buildings from its architects, RDHA, the building is fresh proof that libraries are the locus of creative architecture in Canada. Waterdown brings together an elegant metaphor and accessibility with a sense of place – and shows how excellent art can emerge from constraints.

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