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Leadership and Encouragement for the 21st Century
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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How To Know When You Need A Mental Health Day

How To Know When You Need A Mental Health Day | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

If we treated mental health more like physical health, no one would question why you'd need a day off from work to take care of yourself.


Mental health is just as important as your physical health when it comes to your overall well-being. If you don’t proactively address your mental health, you won’t be able to perform at your best. That’s why it’s a good idea to give yourself a day off from time to time to relax your mind.


Here’s how to know when you need a mental health day.

 

Via Pamir Kiciman
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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How Inactivity Changes the Brain

How Inactivity Changes the Brain | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Being sedentary appears to alter the brain in ways that may affect heart health, a new study found.

 

A number of studies have shown that exercise can remodel the brain by prompting the creation of new brain cells and inducing other changes. Now it appears that inactivity, too, can remodel the brain, according to a notable new report.

 

The study, which was conducted in rats but likely has implications for people too, the researchers say, found that being sedentary changes the shape of certain neurons in ways that significantly affect not just the brain but the heart as well. The findings may help to explain, in part, why a sedentary lifestyle is so bad for us.

 

Until about 20 years ago, most scientists believed that the brain’s structure was fixed by adulthood, that you couldn’t create new brain cells, alter the shape of those that existed or in any other way change your mind physically after adolescence.

 

But in the years since, neurological studies have established that the brain retains plasticity, or the capacity to be reshaped, throughout our lifetimes. Exercise appears to be particularly adept at remodeling the brain, studies showed.

 

But little has been known about whether inactivity likewise alters the structure of the brain and, if so, what the consequences might be.


Via Pamir Kiciman
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Isolate Toxic Employees to Reduce Their Negative Effects

Isolate Toxic Employees to Reduce Their Negative Effects | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Even a small act of rudeness can ripple across a team.

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donhornsby's curator insight, November 15, 2016 7:49 PM
The overall health of your organization depends on how you deal with toxic employees. Toxic employees are simply too costly to ignore. Like a virus, their negativity can spread through your team and organization. To immunize your organization, consider what you can do to isolate the toxic person — or get rid of them altogether. Your employees and organization will have a much better chance of thriving. And, you will have a much better chance of retaining your talent
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Leadership and Spirituality
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Kahneman on Well-Being and Domains of Consciousness

Kahneman on Well-Being and Domains of Consciousness | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
A Nobel Winning Psychologist

 

From the vantage point of the unified theory, there is much to like and only a little to critique regarding Kahneman's work. He is a brilliant experimentalist (I believe he is the only psychologist who has won a Nobel prize-let me know if you know of another) and his studies led to a whole field of behavioral (psychological?) economics. His work on the two mental systems, System 1 and System 2 and their corollaries in consciousness (experiential and reflective/remembering) is directly congruent with the model of cognition advocated for in the unified theory. (Behavioral Investment Theory provides the theoretical frame for System 1, and the Justification Hypothesis for System 2).

 


Via Sharrock, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
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Sharrock's curator insight, December 19, 2013 10:10 AM

Kahneman's work indirectly suggests that educators can improve student approaches to problem solving and decision making and as a result improve resilience. If we can overcome some of the destructive habits of the mind on "cruise control", we may improve our outcomes.

 

from the article:

"Kahneman makes three key points in this talk (TEDtalk, where he explains how the two domains of human consciousness differ quite dramatically in what it means to be happy TEDx). The first point, which is somewhat subtle in that he only briefly alludes to it, is that happiness is a complicated construct and that there has been a shift away from this term, as it has been found not to capture the essence of what researchers are interested in. 

The second key point that Kahneman makes is that humans are of two minds, what he refers to in this talk as the experiencing and remembering selves. 

The third key point was how the experiencing self and the remembering self evaluate situations differently."

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, December 19, 2013 3:44 PM

Happiness is important to the way we live and our potential success.