21st Century Leadership
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21st Century Leadership
Leadership and Encouragement for the 21st Century
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from What I Wish I Had Known
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Your Success, On Your Terms. For All the Right Reasons.

Your Success, On Your Terms. For All the Right Reasons. | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Everyone in life is a free agent. You are a leader who can sell your strengths and services to or within an organization. With technology and other tools you can choose to be on-site or off site to provide those services. The key is that you are in charge of your own personal leadership vision. You are accountable for you

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Anita's curator insight, May 24, 9:39 AM
How can you lead your life and career?
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from MILE Leadership
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Three Essential Public Speaking Tips - People Development Magazine

Three Essential Public Speaking Tips - People Development Magazine | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Public speaking isn't for everyone - Here's our handy tips on how to deliver your best at your next public speech, including preparation, breathing techniques and confident body language.

Via The People Development Network
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Leadership Best Practices because Culture Matters
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Why Leaders Who Listen Achieve Breakthroughs

Why Leaders Who Listen Achieve Breakthroughs | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
As a leader, communicating can sometimes feel like Groundhog Day. No matter how hard you try to get your message across, it is all too easy to find the next day that you face the same blank stares, predictable objections, and questions that indicate that you failed to make it stick — that people just aren’t getting it. One reason leaders find themselves in this cycle is that their approach to communication is based on an outdated mental model. It’s a model best described as a “post office.” They view themselves as the sender of a message and others as the receivers. If problems arise, leaders look for disruption somewhere along the route.

The post office model focuses most leaders’ attention on the sending process, rather than the give-and-take of effective conversations. Even if they invite people to ask questions and truly value their buy-in, these leaders are still preoccupied with their message. This leaves them ignorant about the larger context and reality on the ground, including emerging issues and game-changing opportunities. In the extreme, thinking in terms of the post office model causes leaders to make decisions in isolation or miss the early warning signs of dysfunctional momentum.

Via David Hain, Mark Taylor
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David Hain's curator insight, April 30, 7:49 AM

In leadership, 'receive' is so much more important than 'send', but so much rarer...Elizabeth Doty in praise of listening.

Jerry Busone's curator insight, April 30, 11:25 AM

Listening is a skill that requires practice . So many Leaders are solution focused they run down rabbit holes they could have avoided through listening ... all is us in general could work at improving our listening skills

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Coaching Leaders
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We Cannot Lead Others Without First Leading From Within | Lolly Daskal 

What makes a great leader? Leadership and management expert Lolly Daskal takes the stereotype of the single, superior figure wielding power over the masses and turns it inside out—literally. “We think leadership is an external quality, but it is and always has been an internal quality,” Daskal says. “Leaders aren’t great because they have power, but because they can empower others.” Effective leadership is as simple—and challenging—as knowing who you are, what you stand for, and how you can use that to serve others. Daskal’s talk introduces you to your inherent ability to lead from within. Are you ready?

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David Hain's curator insight, May 18, 2:22 AM

Should be required watching for all who call themselves leaders!

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5 Behaviors of Leaders Who Embrace Change

5 Behaviors of Leaders Who Embrace Change | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

At best, mergers and acquisitions (M&A’s) have a 50/50 chance of reaching their intended results. Study after study puts the failure rate closer to 70-90%. Why is the failure rate so high? Repeatedly, research cites the human factor as the leading reason why mergers and acquisitions fail.


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A 30-60-90 Day Plan For New Leaders

A 30-60-90 Day Plan For New Leaders | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Leaders new to a team have the unenviable task of getting results, building trust and establishing credibility.  All the while they are learning their new role, and possibly even a new company.

For some leaders, doing one or the other is attainable, but doing all simultaneously can be a daunting task. It can be a delicate balance at times, and giving attention to everything at once can be a bit overwhelming.

Whether the leader is brand new to leadership, or new to their team, or is a seasoned leader in a new company, the ability to quickly establish change can make or break the leader as well as their teams, and possibly the organization.

I have realized over the years that the most effective way for a leader to create results and build culture is to adopt a rolling focus, 30-60-90 day game plan. Here it is in simplified form:


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How to Stop Sabotaging Yourself 

How to Stop Sabotaging Yourself  | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
To stop sabotaging yourself, you must first recognize when you’re getting in your own way. Some of the time, we’re acutely and painfully aware of this—like when we find ourselves procrastinating before taking care of a (literal or figurative) mess, so that it becomes a bigger deal to clean up later. Or we impulsively buy a large bag of potato chips when we’re trying to cut back on junk food.

Of course, other times we’re less aware of our self-sabotage or we misdiagnose the core problem. This happens a lot in relationships. For instance, when you’re feeling competitive with the mom of your child’s playdate friend, you may get into a cycle of baiting and antagonizing each other, without recognizing your passive-aggressive interaction style. This gets in the way of you focusing on her great qualities and holds you back from potentially becoming good friends.

To stop sabotaging yourself, you need to figure out your patterns of behavior and then find creative ways to counteract them and form new habits.

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David Hain's curator insight, May 23, 7:17 AM

Self-awareness is the key to learning to manage and improve our 'screw-up' habits and behaviours.

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Three illusions of leading teams

Three illusions of leading teams | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Directive leadership is not better or worse than empowering leadership. Each style is effective in some contexts while ineffective in others. To better apply empowering and directive leadership when the occasion calls for it, consider three common illusions of leading teams and how to address them.

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David Hain's curator insight, May 16, 4:45 AM

If only one style predicted great leadership, most of us are doomed! Good article on the importance of flexing to suit the situation and the people involved.

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5 Job Interview Questions That Reveal What a Candidate Has Really Accomplished

5 Job Interview Questions That Reveal What a Candidate Has Really Accomplished | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Want to ask job interview questions that let you find out what a job candidate has really accomplished? Here are some great questions, along with some of the best answers.
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Chad Manske's curator insight, May 17, 8:20 PM
These are all pretty good questions to consider, and are admittedly different than most asked at job interviews. Yet I would offer to what end would you ask these as they may not get after job related issues if you have limited interview time.
Andrea Ross's curator insight, May 23, 6:21 AM

Morning all, I've recently put together a comprehensive list of behavioural based interview questions for a number of clients that are ramping up their hiring this year. It can be a huge task considering all the information out there on the subject.  For those that are hiring will find this article useful with 5 relevant interview questions to help verify the suitability for the role. Happy Interviewing. 

Andrea Ross's curator insight, May 23, 6:28 AM

Morning all. I've recently compiled a comprehensive list of behavioural based interview questions for agency recruitment and in-house clients over the last week. It can be pretty daunting with the amount of information out there. If anyone is out there that has just started interviewing talent then please take a read of this article it has 5 relevant questions that will help verify the suitability of the person for the role. Happy Interviewing!!

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Leadership Advice & Tips
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3 Things Companies Do to Build an Exceptional Culture

3 Things Companies Do to Build an Exceptional Culture | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Exceptional workplace doesn't happen by accident.  It starts with a clearly defined vision that includes the company's core values, a detailed description of what each of those values means on a day-to-day basis, and a system for measuring  whether or not the people in the organization are living those values.

I refer to this plan as a culture blueprint, and it's critical to the creation and scaling of your company's culture, just as an architect's plans are to the building of a skyscraper. Done correctly, it serves as a North Star to the senior management team as you hire and manage the company's workforce. Without it, you'll end up building something that's likely to collapse under its own weight.  


Via The Learning Factor, Cruise Line Class
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 17, 8:56 PM

Top employers create a blueprint, treat HR like a sales organization and govern by meritocracy.

Ann Zaslow-Rethaber's curator insight, May 18, 1:52 PM

 

Company culture is incredibly important ,and far too many companies fail to invest the time and resources to create a positive one. 

 

Make no mistake ...every single company HAS a culture, regardless of weather you try to create one, or not. 

 

What is yours?

 

 

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Positive futures
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How to Gain Power at Work When You Have None

How to Gain Power at Work When You Have None | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
How do you gain power when you have none?

More employers are opening new paths to leadership by encouraging employees to develop spheres of influence that have nothing to do with the org chart.

Such informal power is increasingly important—and valued—in today’s flatter organizations, where more jobs confer responsibility for teammates’ performance without the authority to give orders or dish out rewards or punishment, says corporate trainer Dana Brownlee, of Atlanta.

Specific behaviors can predict informal power, and many of them can be learned, she says. Networking across departments, building expertise in new areas and cultivating charisma are all ways to gain power, and make you a go-to person for colleagues.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, May 22, 5:35 AM

Some thoughts about gaining informal power. Turns out that taking an interest in others and always taking a positive view are perhaps more important than you might think...

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Coaching Leaders
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Dehumanizing Always Starts With Language

Dehumanizing Always Starts With Language | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Dehumanizing always starts with language, often followed by images. We see this throughout history. During the Holocaust, Nazis described Jews as Untermenschen—subhuman. They called Jews rats and depicted them as disease-carrying rodents in everything from military pamphlets to children’s books. Hutus involved in the Rwanda genocide called Tutsis cockroaches. Indigenous people are often referred to as savages. Serbs called Bosnians aliens. Slave owners throughout history considered slaves subhuman animals.

I know it’s hard to believe that we ourselves could ever get to a place where we would exclude people from equal moral treatment, from our basic moral values, but we’re fighting biology here. We’re hardwired to believe what we see and to attach meaning to the words we hear. We can’t pretend that every citizen who participated in or was a bystander to human atrocities was a violent psychopath. That’s not possible, it’s not true, and it misses the point. The point is that we are all vulnerable to the slow and insidious practice of dehumanizing, therefore we are all responsible for recognizing it and stopping it.

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David Hain's curator insight, May 22, 5:57 AM

Mind your language! Powerful piece from Brene Brown on how dehumanisation always starts with the words we choose to use.