1950's Sitcoms
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Living our own fairy tale...: 1950s Mom

Living our own fairy tale...: 1950s Mom | 1950's Sitcoms | Scoop.it
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This woman is blogging about what type of mom she thinks she might have been in the 1950's.  Sometimes she feels as though she is cheating her child from attention when she is using her phone and social media sites. She explains when she sees moms like June Cleaver that she wonders should she have the same traits?  Clean house, dinner on the table, knitting past-time, gardening.  Do you think mothers today are intimidated by the mothers in 1950?  Or was the 1950's mother more of a mythical creature?

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Trophy Wife EP: ABC Gave Us No Cougar Town-Style Pushback on Provocative Title - TV Balla

Trophy Wife EP: ABC Gave Us No Cougar Town-Style Pushback on Provocative Title - TV Balla | 1950's Sitcoms | Scoop.it

Trophy Wife is a perfect marriage of concept and title — one both the new sitcom’s producers and ABC are quite comfortable with, it was explained Sunday at the Television Critics Assoc.
Read more at http://www.tvballa.com/2013/08/103252/trophy-wife-ep-abc-gave-us-no-cougar-town-style-pushback-provocative-title#tukUXPSqieemu1wh.99 ;


Via Maryjoie Sevilla
Natalie Royals's insight:

This article is about the new ABC TV show Trophy Wife.  It's about a much younger woman who marrys an older man and has to prove to his ex wives that she is not just a "trophy wife".  I watched this shows pilot episode and I found it interesting that the woman who plays the new wife is just like a 1950's wife; taking care of the chilren, no known job, home to do what the husband says and being the cleaner of the house. Why is it that we always have to give these roles to the women?  Even in many of todays sitcoms we see the mother typically taking care of the kids and making dinner.  Most woman that have families today have a job also, so I find it hard to believe the way most women are portrayed on TV.  Do you think much has changed since the 1950's in terms of the role of women on TV?

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Father Knows Best @ The Classic TV Database

Father Knows Best @ The Classic TV Database | 1950's Sitcoms | Scoop.it
Father Knows Best is an American radio and television comedy series which portrayed a middle class family life in the Midwest. It was created by writer Ed James[1] in the 1940s, and ran on radio from 1949 to 1954 and on television from 1954 to 1960.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
Natalie Royals's insight:

This article explains the show "Father Knows Best" and how it started on radio then came to TV around the 1950's.  In the article they explain to roles of the family members and the father is the one who doesn't have all the answers but yet the sitcom stuck to the standard of the 1950s.  Most of the stroylines include forgiveness and life lessons.  Do you think that today most of the sitcoms we watch are about life lessons and always have a happy ending?  Are they too unrealistic? What do you think about the mother being the disciplinarian?

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Equality of the Sexes: Men Raising Children Is Not a Comedy of Errors

Equality of the Sexes: Men Raising Children Is Not a Comedy of Errors | 1950's Sitcoms | Scoop.it

On Mother's Day, we wrote about feminism to honour our Mom. Strangely, even putting Father's Day on the calendar was a gender-based battle. Apparently, the idea of men receiving sentimental greeting cards was comical. Not to our father, who wasn't big on stereotypes. We're feminists, in part, because of him. Anyone can become a father, but not everyone can become a Dad. That's a title earned reciting Dr. Seuss and chauffeuring kids to soccer practice. Our dad did all of this and the household chores while sitcoms made a spectacle of the idea -- as if men raising children is a comedy of errors. Along with the cleaning and laundry, Dad made our school lunches. Granted, most days this consisted of processed cheese on white bread. Mom helped, of course, and she did the taxes and minor repairs around the house. We grew up with the assumption that all parents shared domestic duties. Later we realized our household defied traditional gender roles. Since then, we've seen fatherhood span every extreme. At the World Economic Forum, we've watched Fortune 500 fathers breakdown in tears and confide that after working 90-hour weeks, their kids won't speak to them. In developing countries, it's not uncommon for men to leave home for extended periods to work, while keeping one family in the field and another in the city. In the United States, one in three kids is considered "fatherless." And in Canada, only 11 per cent of eligible fathers take parental leave, outside of Quebec, which has extended benefits. That said, we don't live in a Leave it to Beaver society; our cultural norms don't set fathers up for success. In divorce cases, fathers struggle to gain custody. Discrepancy between work and school schedules is stress-inducing for both parents, but men cite longer work hours as the biggest barrier to quality family time. And in the U.S., where absent fathers plague the social system, paternity leave is rare. In other industrialized countries, like Iceland, new fathers are entitled to three months of paid leave. Apparently, our Dad was way ahead of his time. A recent study from Oxford University predicts that domestic equality won't be reached until 2050, when men and women will divide household chores and childcare duties evenly. No doubt women everywhere are wondering how men will catch up in just four decades. We'll get there if we invest in fathers, support their roles as caregivers and chip away at stereotypes. We can start with the macho male formula for success, where a man is measured by his paycheque, the title on his business card and the speed of his car. The father figure is not nearly as sexy. The guy who trades his BlackBerry for a baby monitor might forfeit corporate status. But this is the Dad who'll be a hero in his child's earliest memories. Ours' play like a movie reel of iconic images--running to bed for a story, fishing with Dad. Fatherhood is the most important job in a man's life, and children are a living legacy.


Via Cindy Sullivan
Natalie Royals's insight:

This author of this article believes that men and women share the duties of the house because that is how she grew up. TV shows the father as someone who can't take care of a child, so they got out and make money instead.  Her father was the one who did the laundry and the dishes and all the other domestic duties. According to the article domestic equality wont be seen till 2050.  We have come to believe that fathers are the ones who go out and work and the mothers stay home with the children, and according to TV sitcoms, that is how it will always be. Do you think the younger generations that watch shows like Family Guy and Modern Family will start to believe that the womans role is in the kitchen or will they forget about the whole stupid dad idea and try to change the way dads are seen in the future?

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The Distress of the Privileged

The Distress of the Privileged | 1950's Sitcoms | Scoop.it

In a memorable scene from the 1998 film Pleasantville (in which two 1998 teen-agers are transported into the black-and-white world of a 1950s TV show), the father of the TV-perfect Parker family returns from work and says the magic words “Honey, I’m home!”, expecting them to conjure up a smiling wife, adorable children, and dinner on the table.


Via jean lievens
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Why Does TV Love To Portray Dads As Idiots?

Why Does TV Love To Portray Dads As Idiots? | 1950's Sitcoms | Scoop.it

I was recently discussing the resurgence of the Idiot Dad trend with my cousin, a conservative married mother of two. On every political axis we find ourselves on opposite poles, but on this issue we finally found some common ground. "I don't want my kids to think that dads are incompetent," she explained, "It's so insulting!" We already worry about children absorbing gendered messaging—adventure, exploration, and construction tools for boys, glitter and princess gear for girls—but what do they learn about their parents, or the way parents are "supposed" to be, from advertising and TV?


Via Megan Walsh
Natalie Royals's insight:

This article touches on issues we discussed in class today about the whole "idiot dad" idea. The woman who wrote this article seemed to think that her kids are going to think their dad is "incompetent" by watching these shows and seeing how the dads are acting. She thinks this is an "insulting view of fatherhood". She also mentioned another thing we talked about in class; how advertisers target women instead of men because they know they are the ones doing the housework and watching the TV. She believes if we stop showing interest in how they are depicting dads then they won't be able to do it anymore.

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