18th Amendment And the Volstead Act
55 views | +0 today
Follow
18th Amendment And the Volstead Act
A page describing the connection between the 18th Amendment and the Volstead Act
Curated by Martino Locke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Martino Locke
Scoop.it!

2 Paragraphs

            During the 1920’s, America faced many social and economic changes. First, with the ratification of the 18th amendment, prohibition had started in America. Prohibition meant that selling, drinking, and possessing alcohol was illegal. Second, with alcohol being illegal, the mafia saw an opportunity to provide what people wanted and make a profit at the same time. They continued to do this until alcohol was legalized again. Also, with the mafia having to worry about police shutting them down, they began to bribe police. This caused many cops to become crooked and often looked the other way when it came to shutting down a place that still sold alcohol. In fact, those places were called speakeasies. A speakeasy was a place that sold alcohol but was only seen as a nightclub to police who didn’t really know. Mafia bosses trying to find another way to make money often started them up. With these speakeasies being opened up, some let blacks come in and play. The genre of music they played back then was jazz, the smooth, laid back, and often wild type of music. This helped jazz blow up. To conclude, many of the changes in the 1920’s weren’t the best for America, nor the time period.

            Due to all of the social and economic changes in the 1920’s, Americans daily lives changed drastically. First, prohibition had just started in America. There was no alcohol you could buy legally, anywhere. Second, when the mafia saw there was a demand for alcohol, they supplied it. This type of “business” they were running was very illegal and had many violent consequences. With the mafia supplying the alcohol, more and more crime started to rise. There was violence against neighborhood gangs, or families of the mafia. Another way lives were impacted was because of the many unfair opportunities. Many of the bosses of these families weren’t sent to jail for long periods of time, because of crooked cops. These types of hook-ups offered many unfair opportunities. Lastly, with all these extra things going on and alcohol being illegal, it had to have brought more stress to their lives. Having to worry about the mafia or crooked police messing with your family, and not being able to drink your problems away, must have been hard. To conclude, the 1920’s seemed to be a terrible time to be an American.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martino Locke
Scoop.it!

Website Connecting Topic to Today #2

A dry county is a county in the United States whose government forbids the sale of alcoholic beverages. Some prohibit off-premises sale, some prohibit on-premises sale, and some prohibit both. Hundreds of dry counties exist across the United States, a majority of them in the South. A number of smaller jurisdictions also exist, such as cities, towns and townships, which prohibit the sale of alcoholic beverages. These are known as dry towns, dry cities or dry townships.

Although the 21st Amendment repealed the prohibition of alcohol on the federal level, that Amendment does allow for its prohibition by state or local laws. Some states after the repeal passed local option laws granting counties and municipalities, either by popular vote or ordinance, the ability to decide for themselves whether to allow alcohol.

Many dry communities do not prohibit the mere consumption of alcohol, which could potentially cause a loss of profits and taxes from the sale of alcohol to their residents in "wet" (non-prohibition) areas. The rationale for maintaining prohibition on the local level often is religious in nature, as many Protestant Christian denominations discourage the consumption of alcohol by their followers (see Christianity and alcohol, sumptuary law, and Baptists and Bootleggers). While state law does not allow for dry counties, similar laws designed to restrict the sale and consumption of alcohol also are common in the mostly LDS (Mormon) state of Utah. Utah state law prohibits local jurisdictions from exercising control over liquor laws. An additional, more pragmatic intent of these laws often is to reduce alcohol consumption in that particular county (and the potential health, safety, and public order issues that can accompany it) by limiting the ease of acquiring it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martino Locke
Scoop.it!

Primary Doc #3: Message to Congress from FDR

To the Congress:

I recommend to the Congress the passage of legislation for the immediate modification of the Volstead Act, in order to legalize the manufacture and sale of beer and other beverages of such alcoholic content as is permissible under the Constitution; and to provide through such manufacture and sale, by substantial taxes, a proper and much-needed revenue for the Government. I deem action at this time to be of the highest importance.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martino Locke
Scoop.it!

Primary Doc #1: Excerpt from Volstead Act


TITLE II. Prohibition of Intoxicating Beverages.

SEC. 3.
No person shall on or after the date when the eighteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States goes into effect, manufacture, sell, barter, transport, import, export, deliver, furnish or possess any intoxicating liquor except as authorized in this Act, and all the provisions of this Act shall be liberally construed to the end that—the use of intoxicating liquor as a beverage may be prevented. . . .

SEC. 21.
Any room, house, building, boat, vehicle, structure, or place where intoxicating liquor is manufactured, sold, kept, or bartered in violation of this title, and all intoxicating liquor and property kept and used in maintaining the same, is hereby declared to be a common nuisance, and any person who maintains such a common nuisance shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be fined not more than $1,000 or be imprisoned for not more than one year, or both. . . .

SEC. 25.
It shall be unlawful to have or possess any liquor or property designed for the manufacture of liquor intended for use in violating this title or which has been so used, and no property rights shall exist in any such liquor or property. . . . No search warrant shall issue to search any private dwelling occupied as such unless it is being used for the unlawful sale of intoxicating liquor, or unless it is in part used for some business purpose such as a store, shop, saloon, restaurant, hotel, or boarding house. . . .

SEC. 29.
Any person who manufactures or sells liquor in violation of this title shall for a first offense be fined not more than $1,000, or imprisoned not exceeding six months, and for a second or subsequent offense shall be fined not less than $200 nor more than $2,000 and be imprisoned not less than one month nor more than five years.

Any person violating the provisions of any permit, or who makes any false record, report, or affidavit required by this title, or violates any of the provisions of this title, for which offense a special penalty is not prescribed, shall be fined for a first offense not more than $500; for a second offense not less than $100 nor more than $1,000, or be imprisoned not more than ninety days; for any subsequent offense he shall be fined not less than $500 and be imprisoned not less than three months nor more than two years. . . .

SEC. 33.
After February 1, 1920, the possession of liquors by any person not legally permitted under this title to possess liquor shall be prima facie evidence that such liquor is kept for the purpose of being sold, bartered, exchanged, given away, furnished, or otherwise disposed of in violation of the provisions of this title. . . . But it shall not be unlawful to possess liquors in one’s private dwelling while the same is occupied and used by him as his dwelling only and such liquor need not be reported, provided such liquors are for use only for the personal consumption of the owner thereof and his family residing in such dwelling and of his bona fide guests when entertained by him therein; and the burden of proof shall be upon the possessor in any action concerning the same to prove that such liquor was lawfully acquired, possessed, and used. . . .
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martino Locke
Scoop.it!

Historical Website #2

The Volstead Act (the National Prohibition Act of 1919) was enabling legislation enacted to provide for the implementation of the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which established National Prohibition of alcoholic beverages.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martino Locke
Scoop.it!

Vocabulary Words

1. Prohibition - the prevention by law of the manufacture and sale of alcohol, especially in the US between 1920 and 1933.
Throughout America during the 1920’s, alcohol was outlawed due to prohibition.

2. Speakeasy - an illicit liquor store or nightclub.
Many mobsters like Al Capone opened speakeasies to sell alcohol illegally.

3. Amendment - an article added to the US Constitution
There are 27 Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

4. Legislation - laws, considered collectively
My government will introduce legislation to reform support for housing costs.

5. Ratified - sign or give formal consent to a treaty, contract, or agreement, making it officially valid
38 states are needed to ratify an amendment to the Constitution.

6. Constitution - the basic written set of principles and precedents of federal government in the US, which came into operation in 1789 and has since been modified by twenty-seven amendments
The Constitution was signed on May 14, 1787 in Philadelphia, PA.

7. Intoxicating - causes someone to lose control of their faculties or behavior.
The 18th amendment outlawed intoxicating beverages.

8. Bootlegger – people who sold alcohol illegally for a profit
Al Capone was not only a mafia boss, but also a bootlegger.

9. Bona fide - genuine; real
You could only get a little alcohol (legally) if you had a bona fide guest.

10. Consumption - the eating, drinking, or ingesting of something
The consumption of alcohol increased when alcohol was legalized again.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martino Locke
Scoop.it!

Primary Doc #2: 18th Amendment

Section 1: After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited.

Section 2: The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Section 3: This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martino Locke
Scoop.it!

Historical Website #3

Historical Website #3 | 18th Amendment And the Volstead Act | Scoop.it
Obtain documents, public disclosure forms, historical data and Member and Committee information for the U.S. House of Representatives
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martino Locke
Scoop.it!

Historical Website #1

Historical Website #1 | 18th Amendment And the Volstead Act | Scoop.it
The Volstead Act enabled the US to enforce the National Prohibition Act, beginning the Prohibition. The Volstead Act specifically...
more...
Cassie Presto's curator insight, December 15, 2013 6:37 PM

This article discusses the Volstead act and why it was ratified. The volstead act was passed in 1919. This act is does not allow the sale, transport, manufacture, and consumption of alcohol. It was made because alcohol was known as a harmful substance. It was eventually repealed because many did not stop the consumption of alcohol. Also The consumption of alcohol increased during the Prohibition