Zukunft des Lernens
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Zukunft des Lernens
Entwicklung neuer Lehr-/Lernszenarien - Future of Learning - Developement of new Learning settings
Curated by Volkmar Langer
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Corporate Learning 2025 MOOCathon | Corporate Learning Community

Corporate Learning 2025 MOOCathon | Corporate Learning Community | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
Kurzbeschreibung des Corporate Learning 2025 MOOCathon vom 8. Mai bis zum 21. Juli 2017. Kostenloser Online-Kurs für Corporate Learning Professionals.
Volkmar Langer's insight:
Wie könnte die Gestaltung von Corporate Learning in 2025 aussehen? Dieser Frage gehen in den nächsten Wochen ca. 900 Teilnehmer/innen des #CL2025 MOOCathon nach. 
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Hot or Not: How Do MOOCs Fit into Corporate eLearning? by Pamela S. Hogle : Learning Solutions Magazine

Hot or Not: How Do MOOCs Fit into Corporate eLearning? by Pamela  S. Hogle : Learning Solutions Magazine | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
MOOCs are evolving and moving into the world of corporate eLearning. Learning Solutions Magazine polled five thought leaders on whether—and how—MOOCs can benefit corporate learners.
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Research Trends in Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Theses and Dissertations: Surfing the Tsunami Wave

Research Trends in Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Theses and Dissertations: Surfing the Tsunami Wave | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
By Ignatia / Inge de Waard, Aras BOZKURT, and Nilgun Özdamar Keskin in Education and Online and Distance Education. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have attracted a great deal of attention by higher education and private enterprises. MOOCs have
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University of London MOOC Report | Barney Grainger, U. London


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Manuel León Urrutia's curator insight, March 2, 2014 12:28 PM

Another MOOC report, this time from University of London. Section 6 specially interesting for MOOC making. 

luiy's curator insight, April 15, 2014 6:21 PM

Project Planning a MOOC

 

The course teams involved with our MOOCs included experienced academics with familiarity in developing materials on a learning platform. Nonetheless, for each of them it was their first experience of MOOCs, as it was for the project planning team.

 

 

Delivering a MOOC

 

A range of styles and learning methods were adopted by the four MOOCs, appropriate to the subject matter covered. A MOOC structure of six weeks and 5-10 student effort hours per week of study appeared to be just right for the majority of students (55%). Some considerations for future delivery include:

 

< Well designed announcements at the beginning and end of each week that articulate with the topic coverage, learning activities and assessment methods can be effective at maintaining student interest and motivation.


< Management of forum threads and posts is a critical factor in dealing with massive scale short courses to ensure the majority of students are not affected negatively by the behaviour of a small number of the community, while preserving the openness of the discussion areas.

 

< The Coursera platform tools are significant and comprehensive in terms of plotting overall student activity, allowing evaluation of assessment data, as well as usage statistics on video resources and other learning activities; however, further refinement of these tools to enable both students and teaching staff to understand their progression at an individual level is necessary (and underway).



** Learning Resource Development


 


María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, May 20, 2014 5:22 AM

University of London MOOC Report .

I Barney Gracinger, U. London

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Infographic: Why Aren't Students Completing MOOCs?

Infographic: Why Aren't Students Completing MOOCs? | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it

MOOCs (free online courses that are open to anyone) are more popular than Justin Bieber right now, but why aren't students finishing the courses they signed up for?


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Elaine Watkins's curator insight, October 24, 2013 10:29 PM

I was one of the 36% of students who completed the Equine Nutrition course. I can tell you why I was able to... It was because there was excellent support from the lecturers, easy to access video lectures, no hard deadlines until the end of the course, meaning there was much more flexibility for people, like me, who work full time and can't always complete quizzes by 6pm each Monday for example. I could do it in my own time, as long as I stayed within the course duration and I found that some weeks I had much more time and could complete 2 weeks worth of readings & quizzes. 

In contrast, I just attempted to complete an Animal Behaviour course, but unfortunately due to hard deadlines each Monday, I was unable to complete quizzes on time and therefore could not achieve the marks necessary to pass, so I gave up halfway through. I have still completed readings and watched lectures, but with no result as the quizzes did not count after the weekly hard deadlines. Obviously many people had the same issue as me, because out of 24950, only

1428 people completed the course.

I believe course designers need to revisit their courses and ensure they are flexible enough for full time workers to do in their own time. 

Christine Aizpurua's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:57 AM

Me ! 

Patricia Christian's curator insight, February 8, 2014 5:45 AM

An integral part of any online learning environment is the social synergy created via communication and discussion.  This is where deep reflection and learning take place.  Are students not feeling connected.  Are they collaborating and creating something new with the knowledge they have gained and sharing it with others?  Learning must me meaningful and applicable.

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Quality and the eye of the MOOC beholder: Perspectives from the OERu on mOOCs and micro-credentials by Wayne Mackintosh

Quality and the eye of the MOOC beholder: Perspectives from the OERu on mOOCs and micro-credentials by Wayne Mackintosh | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
  Wayne Mackintosh is Director at the OER Foundation, a non-profit organisation which provides international networking, leadership and support to education institutions in achieving their str...

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Learning to ‘run a MOOC’

Learning to ‘run a MOOC’ | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
There are more learner interactivity options available than multiple–choice questions and ‘drag and drop’ responses, says Bob Little.

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, May 7, 2013 4:24 PM

Many teacher want to get their classes online for various reasons. The info here will help anyone set it up more professionally.

Anne Whaits's curator insight, May 7, 2013 4:34 PM

Some really interesting reflections and comments in this article. What makes the current form of MOOCs particularly challenging for the learner? Poonam argues that effective learning materials involve the learners and makes a case for the interactive MOOC - the iMOOC. "Those wanting to build iMOOCS – or at least include greater learner interactivity into their courses – could gather inspiration for their instructional design strategy from interactivity building tools."

Richard L. Edwards's curator insight, May 10, 2013 12:24 PM

Certain "truisms" run through articles written on MOOCs. One of the more consistent "stories" repeated from article to article involves the completion rate of MOOCs, hovering around 7%. There are many reasons why MOOCs have low completion rates, but typically the "story" is told as one of MOOC design failure, as in this piece. Quote from this article: "“To engage learners and keep them interested in the course - and motivated to continue and complete it, there’s a need to develop MOOCs that are highly interactive (iMOOCs). No wonder that MOOCs’ learner drop-out rates are extremely high,” [Poonam Jaypuriya] commented. “According to our information, typically, we’re seeing only seven or eight per cent of learners completing courses.” I agree with the 7% completion rate, which matches my hands-on experience. But I disagree with the assessment of why 93% of my students did not complete my MOOC. In fact, let's consider the admission requirements for a MOOC. Typically, a student submits an email address. There is no transcript verification, there is no statement of commitment (i.e. how much this "learner" will prioritize a free class when other life and work events occur during the course), and no really penalty from just dropping out of the course at any time for any reason. MOOCs are a fascinating experiment, and while some MOOCs clearly have a way to go to fully leverage the full and already available possibilities of a quality engaging online education, that is not the fundamental reason for low completion rates. MOOC providers need to figure out how to secure learning commitments from students. And to play the contrarian on this issue, I would argue that the top retention tools of traditional higher education have been tuition cost, admissions standards, and verifiable transcripts, not the quality of course design (and I mean course design principles as opposed to faculty reputation). 

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Half an Hour: Evaluating a MOOC

Half an Hour: Evaluating a MOOC | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it

I was asked (along with Dave Cormier and George Siemens):

"How might it be possible to show that cMOOCs are effective for learning, in the sense of providing evidence that institutions might accept so as to support opening up more courses to outside participants (a la ds106, Alec Couros' EC&I 831, etc.)? Or, more generally, providing evidence that participation in and facilitating cMOOCs is worthy of support by institutions... What I'm looking for are criteria one might use to say that a cMOOC is successful. What should participants be getting out of cMOOCs?"

I think the best way to understand success in a MOOC is by analogy with, say a book, or a game, or a trip to the city. ...

 

by Stephen Downes

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About MOOC Completion Rates: The Importance of Student Investment

About MOOC Completion Rates: The Importance of Student Investment | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
I just finished teaching a Massive Online Open Class (MOOC) titled “Computational Investing, Part I” via coursera.org. 53,000 people “enrolled,” which is to say they clicked...

 

by Tucker Balch


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Top Free Classes's comment, January 12, 2013 1:57 AM
Students' reviews tell different story and clearly explain low completion rate for this course. http://www.topfreeclasses.com/course/7122
Peter Bryant's curator insight, January 14, 2013 10:27 AM

A case study for the impact of learning design on student achievement, a critical KPI for a lot of institutions

 

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, January 16, 2013 10:36 PM

Reading this helped me remember that I haven't done the first assignments for the Mooc I'm enrolled in.  Sigh....

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Why a MOOC? 6 Reasons

Why a MOOC?  6 Reasons | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it

There is no shortage of news about MOOCs in the media. When a topic gets that much traction, one of my questions is, “What part of the story is not...

 

 

 by Bernard Bull


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Coursera Takes A Big Step Toward Monetization, Now Lets Students Earn “Verified Certificates” For A Fee | TechCrunch

Coursera Takes A Big Step Toward Monetization, Now Lets Students Earn “Verified Certificates” For A Fee | TechCrunch | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
Stanford professors Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng launched Coursera last year to give anyone and everyone access to courses from top-tier universities -- for free, online.
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Massive Open Online Courses Prove Popular, if Not Lucrative Yet

Massive Open Online Courses Prove Popular, if Not Lucrative Yet | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
New companies are partnering with universities to offer online courses, in an effort that could define the future of higher education — if anyone can figure out how to make money.

 

by  Tamar Lewin

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Kenneth Anderson: What’s the Business Model for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)? And What Does Online Education Strategically Mean for the Long-Run Rent Structure of Higher Education? Is ...

Kenneth Anderson: What’s the Business Model for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)? And What Does Online Education Strategically Mean for the Long-Run Rent Structure of Higher Education? Is ... | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it

Melissa Korn and Jennifer Levitz ask a good question in a news article about so-called “Massive Open Online Courses” in today’s Wall Street Journal: what’s the business model?  How do they generate revenues?  There is a lot of discussion about how online education is going to shake up the cosseted business models of today’s brick and mortar universities, and MOOCs are often raised as a first wave of change.

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Moocs oder Snocs?

Moocs oder Snocs? | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
Vielen deutschen Business Schools sagen Online-Kurse für einen ausgewählten Teilnehmer-Kreis zu. Angebote, die für alle offen sind, gefallen den meisten weniger.

Von Christine Demmer
Volkmar Langer's insight:
Back to the roots, more konnectivistic learning.
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A Guide for MOOC Course Developers and Facilitators: “The MOOC Case Book”

A Guide for MOOC Course Developers and Facilitators: “The MOOC Case Book” | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
Following is a review of “The MOOC Case Book: Case Studies in MOOC Design, Development and Implementation” the second-place winner of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT)’s Division of Distance Learning (DDL) Book Award, 2016. The “MOOC Case Book” is a collection of case studies written by (mostly) educators sharing their experiences developing,…

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 27, 2:23 AM
A Guide for MOOC Course Developers and Facilitators
DocBiodiv's curator insight, January 27, 1:06 PM
Share your insight
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 6, 1:42 AM
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Europe is re-engineering the generic MOOC model

Europe is re-engineering the generic MOOC model | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it

Europe is characterised by diversity and as such MOOC provision should account for diverse languages, cultures, settings, pedagogies and technologies. In this peer reviewed report the 31 papers demonstrate that Europe is re-engineering the generic MOOC model to allow for a broad spectrum of approaches and contexts...

http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc#


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180 MOOCs to Start the New Year (Is This the Crest of the Wave?)

180 MOOCs to Start the New Year (Is This the Crest of the Wave?) | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
If you haven’t tried a free MOOC, I’d do it sooner than later. In recent weeks, the whole MOOC project took a hit when a University of Pennsylvania study found what was becoming empirically obvious — that MOOCs generally have very low participation and completion rates, and what’s more, most of the students taking the courses are “disproportionately educated, male, [and] wealthy,” and from the United States. This study, combined with other disappointing experiments and findings, will likely make universities think twice about sinking money into creating MOOCs (they can cost anywhere from $15,000 to $50,000 to develop). It might take another 6-12 months to see the shift. But I’d hazard a guess that this January might be the peak of the free MOOC trend. Enjoy them while they last. Whatever their shortcomings, they can be quite informative, and you can’t beat the price.

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Steve Vaitl's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:49 AM

Very little of this do I find this surprising.

MFaculty's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:44 PM

The insights revealed through the previous studies serves to codify what many educators, and even more marketers knew intuitively; free always begs the question of quality. Don't hear what I'm not saying. I'm not saying ALL MOOCs are low quality, I'm merely saying that without academic rigor and effective management, even the best intentions can slide off the rails.

 

I too had noted a number of previous MOOC supporters distancing themselves from the initiatives. Was there ever an identified demand for MOOCs, or were they simply a result of benevolent thinking? Regardless, it is interesting that the 'target audience' for MOOCs are apparently the ones taking least advantage of them. Perhaps the age old marketing rendition of supply and demand has merit still has merit.

Tammy Morley's curator insight, January 8, 2014 7:43 PM

Food for thought.

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MOOCs Directory

MOOCs Directory | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it

"Regardless of your personal opinion on the value of these Massive Open Online Courses, the current reality for many low income, and underserved student populations in the US, and globally is that these free open courses from some of the world's leading experts is a  partial win of the "Educational Access Lottery". Partial because winning the full lottery would require adding free broadband access, and credit options for their MOOCs courses. "


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Dr. Susan Bainbridge's curator insight, August 22, 2013 4:55 AM

Extensive listing of available MOOCs.

Gabi Witthaus's curator insight, August 22, 2013 9:36 AM

Via Susan Bainbridge - extensive listing of available MOOCs.

Pieter de Vries's curator insight, August 22, 2013 12:02 PM

Know where to go ...

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MOOCs and Beyond - eLearning Papers 33 released

MOOCs and Beyond - eLearning Papers 33 released | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it

"

Issue number 33 of eLearning Papers focuses on the challenges and future of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), a trend in education that has skyrocketed since 2008."


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, June 6, 2013 2:34 AM

I have little to add to this other than that the collection of papers provides a distinctive European perspective on MOOCs. As a consequence (?), the focus is more on the pedagogy than on the economics of higher education (@pbsloep)

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MOOCs: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn and Udacity - University profiles | Justin Menard - LISTedTECH

MOOCs: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn and Udacity - University profiles | Justin Menard - LISTedTECH | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it

With Coursera and edX both announced this week they are doubling the number of universities partners, I decided to update the data. I also added another MOOC: Futurelearn

One more thing that was added to the visualisation is the average University World Ranking by MOOCs.


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Top Free Classes's comment, March 7, 2013 10:55 PM
Thanks!
GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's curator insight, March 8, 2013 7:45 AM

Ackn. Justin Menard - interest in Rankings by MOOCs and Uni's

Justin Menard's comment, May 7, 2013 8:59 PM
I have updated the visualisation with the most recent information, added 2 new Moocs and 5 more world university rankings

We now have 6 MOOCs in the Viz: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn, Iversity, OpenEd and Udacity
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Sustainability and MOOCs in Historical Perspective

Overview of the historical factors leading to the development of massive open online courses, and discussion of what this history can tell us of the sustainabil (El conocimiento es un estado de la red, el #aprendizaje es la creación de una...

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Experiences from Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and how the MOOC could potentially increase diversity, social inclusion & learner engagement | Mark Morley

"There is currently much interest and excitement at the emergence of an educational approach commonly termed the ‘Massive Open Online Course’ or MOOC. ... I feel there is much we can learn from the delivery of MOOCs that can be used to enhance the on-campus experience supplemented by online course material and delivery. This format offers us the opportunity to investigate learning and improve teaching processes, perhaps more similar to the edX approach. It would seem appropriate to collect and use data to inform this process; treating learning and teaching as a field ripe for research, tying in to a research-led approach."


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Rose Heaney's curator insight, January 12, 2013 6:30 AM

comprehensive indeed - author has participated in a lot of moocs. Very readable intro for those who have never heard of moocs

Patricia Daniels's curator insight, January 13, 2013 9:17 AM

Interesting and detailed personal insight into cMOOCs and xMOOCs from a participant. I sincerely hope more learners take the time to reflect and share the experiences they have with this kind of learning context. I find as an educator that the student voice is important and assuming that the developers of MOOCs are prepared to listen to critique, both postive and negative, then this is a valuable factor which can lead to improvements which hopefully will have a positive effect on the learner experience and quality of learning.

 

 

 

Hamline CTL's curator insight, February 6, 2013 4:22 PM

MOOCs are not going away!

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What sort of MOOCs would emerge in the coming future?

What sort of MOOCs would emerge in the coming future? | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
Thanks jenny for sharing her views and experience in her post here on OLDSMOOC.  I am interested in knowing the OLDSMOOC though won’t be working on a project.  I think we have now come up wit...

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Lars-Erik Jonsson's curator insight, January 11, 2013 2:33 AM

Intressanta och polariserade jämförelser mellan cMOOOCs och xMOOOCs samt mellan lärande genom undervisning resp lärande genom personlig drivkraft

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Coursera's fee-based course option | Inside Higher Ed

Coursera's fee-based course option | Inside Higher Ed | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it

Coursera will offer a fee-based pathway with identity verification for students who want to earn a more meaningful certificate of completion, the company said today in an announcement that also sheds light on an emerging business model for the largest massive open online course (MOOC) provider.

 

by Paul Fain

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/01/09/courseras-fee-based-course-option#ixzz2HUmN6frn ;
Inside Higher Ed

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Providers of Free MOOC's Now Charge Employers for Access to Student Data - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Providers of Free MOOC's Now Charge Employers for Access to Student Data - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Zukunft des Lernens | Scoop.it
Providers of free online courses are officially in the headhunting business, bringing in revenue by selling to employers information about high-performing students who might be a good fit for open jobs.

 

by Jeffrey R. Young


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Ronald Voorn's comment, January 6, 2013 7:23 AM
Not much money is being made from this though because of the attrition rates.
Tony Parkin's curator insight, January 8, 2013 4:57 AM

The usual paradigm applies ... if a service is free, then you are the product!

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, January 8, 2013 6:21 PM

It makes sense.  Recruiting high performing mooc students who might fit a particular job is like having an extended online interview that really shows what a person can do.  

 

When the motivation for learning is a job instead of a grade, I'm guessing high performance will occur..