Zorgmarketing, zorgbekostiging, business modellen in de zorg
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Ales over business modellen in de zorg, zorgbekostiging, marketing en marktwerking in de zorg
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Rescooped by Joep Bovendeaard from Social Media and Healthcare
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Introduction vs Adoption of #mHealth Technology

Introduction vs Adoption of  #mHealth Technology | Zorgmarketing, zorgbekostiging, business modellen in de zorg | Scoop.it
Before the adoption of new technologies which will undoubtedly improve healthcare (as it has the retail and finance sectors), it must be introduced in ways which are digestible, scalable, and subject to rapid iteration. Is mobile technology different from the adoption of any other change in healthcare delivery? I think not. The culture of care certainly requires change as care models are changing. The point of care is shifting to the home, professionals other than physicians are delivering most of the care, and digital technology is becoming a fact of daily life. With this care shift is the shift of daily tasks to mobile technology. Most mobile tools utilized today by physicians is related to reference or other resources geared towards them, not the patient or care. I suggest a few ways in which the introduction of mobile healthcare tools to physicians will itself lead to adoption. Baby steps are needed in this process contrary to what I see as industry’s ‘Build it and they will come’ philosophy, with its predictable disappointment. The following suggestions are predicated on good medical app development practices.1. Involve physicians in clinical pilots. This accomplishes three things: It introduces physicians to mobile health tools and processes involved in using them. It serves an avenue for user experience feedback from both clinicians and patients, and might provide some outcomes data.2. Establish a network of key opinion leaders. Peer to peer education has a successful track record in both the Pharma and medical device sectors. The ‘in the trenches’ experience provided by these KOLs is invaluable in conveying information and addressing concerns of physicians. It speaks to pain points, benefit to patients, and healthcare and business models. These KOLs using digital tools themselves via closed professional social networks is a model I would look forward to being useful. KOLs have impact via presenting data at professional society meetings, discussing new technologies via traditional media outlets as well as social media.3. Payers incentivizing physicians to use good tools (portal, diabetes tools). The use of mobile health apps and other tools (communications, delivery of educational content, and interoperability of data with EHR) might promote or even necessitate the use of robust patient portals. This therefore accomplishes two things which will benefit patients. Payers are in the unique position to incentivize both patients and providers to take advantage of these mobile tools. In what way can payers incentivize physicians? How about having a physician directory which spotlights those who utilize mobile health technologies? Like-minded patients who desire to become more participatory in their care will gravitate towards these providers, thereby potentially fostering good relationships even before they meet.4. Patients introducing technology. Changing behavior in the doctor-patient relationship can be a bidirectional process. Just as physicians can change patient behavior,patients can exert influence as consumers on physicians by asking questions about the use of digital technologies by their physicians. These inquiries might get physicians thinking. Patients who suggest medications based on DTC marketing ads often receive them. Patients who are proactive are better patients.5. Medical school courses for students. Digital natives (or close to them) are now medical students. There is much enthusiasm by students for the use of mobile technologies in healthcare. Many are designing apps or anxious for others to do so. There are many reasons why medical schools are at the forefront of mobile medical apps. A ‘bottom up’ approach seems logical in this arena because of the slow pace of the change in healthcare culture by the establishment. Mentors in medical school might not be champions of mobile health tools for many reasons. As often is the case in politics of many sectors of society, the new generation is the source of execution of the dreams of others.Though none of these points are revolutionary, they should provide sources of consideration for starting points of those interested in this sector. There needs to be a distinction made between introduction and adoption of technology, as I believe they are considerably different. Thinking about the process this way might result in less frustration by the industry, investors, and create a different model for implementation and sales.
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Joep Bovendeaard's insight:
5 Zinvolle uitgangspunten voor het ontwikkelen en introduceren van mhealth.
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Online Trends for Doctors in 2014

Online Trends for Doctors in 2014 | Zorgmarketing, zorgbekostiging, business modellen in de zorg | Scoop.it
This past year, we saw major changes in how patients research and engage with their healthcare professionals online. It was a year when using online reviews to research doctors, or engaging with them on social media sites like Facebook, became the norm for patients. It’s a trend that’s been building for the last few years, particularly since the major hospitals began adopting the use of social media. This made it acceptable for doctors and their practices to be on social media, and set an expectation among patients that they could connect with their healthcare provides across a number of platforms. Over 60% of patients now research health treatments, procedures, and services online – making it critical that a practice have a successful online and social media presence – and that its coordinated with any offline media such as radio, print or cable television. And among households with over $75,000 incomes, that figure jumps to 83% researching healthcare information. A number of our physician clients tell us that patients now come into the office with a printout of the office’s website, the doctor’s online reviews, or other related information. Patients today see themselves as consumers of healthcare, and this means they regularly seek to arm themselves with information about medical professionals, treatments and procedures, and the perspective other patients. For 2014, there are three interesting trends taking shape for medical professionals in the online and social media space. The most obvious trend is the growth in mobile use, which is rapid and exponential. About two thirds of the engagement we see on our client Facebook pages now come from mobile devices. The highest users of mobile devices among adults are women 25 – 55 years of age. If they have kids, the amount of time on mobile devices increases. This makes sense, since busy mothers use their smart phones to stay in touch with their kids, manage their day, check in with their work, and more. The second trend is visual communication. We’ve seen this developing over the last several years as smart phone adoption became ubiquitous. Photos and video drive much higher attention and engagement than text. This is for two reasons: 1) smart phones lend themselves better to photos or video than text (it’s easier to see on a small screen), and 2) we’re all so busy that we have less time to read. For physicians and practices to be successful online, they should focus on having high quality photos and videos on their website and social media pages. Video in particular is incredibly important to helping prospective patients feel comfortable with a doctor, procedure, or practice. We know someone is much more likely to pick up the phone or e-mail the office if they’ve been able to watch a video.The third trend is something we call “pulse”. We’re communicating much more now by shorts bursts of information. Twitter has been an obvious driver of this, as has mobile, since no one wants to read long paragraphs on a smart phone. But now the trend is across all online forms – websites, blogs, and newsletters should all be shorter and much more to the point. For example, we no longer write long newsletters once a month for our clients, but normally send out two short news bursts each focused around a specific topic. One thing we can plan for 2014 is that the digital environment will become increasingly complex. It will grow more difficult to manage internally, as patient’ expectations rise, platforms become more sophisticated, and staff are required to manage multiple tasks throughout the day. Patients are making judgments about a doctor or practice based on what they see online and will look for other options – even in the case of a referral. Our goal at Truventis is to make it easy for the practice or medical center to succeed online and have presence that’s engaging, sophisticated, and effective in educating the patient about the services provided.
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Joep Bovendeaard's insight:
VS trends van online patient-arts communicatie gaan ook hier komen. Verplichte kost dus voor iedereen die de zorg efficienter en dus betaalbaar willen houden. Blauwe zorg.
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GGZ Eindhoven gaat ehealth diensten verder ontwikkelen ...

GGZ Eindhoven gaat ehealth diensten verder ontwikkelen ... | Zorgmarketing, zorgbekostiging, business modellen in de zorg | Scoop.it
GGZ Eindhoven en de Kempen (GGzE) gaat haar ehealth-diensten verder ontwikkelen en opschalen. Om dit te bereiken is GGzE een duurzame samenwerkovereenkomst.
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Content Marketing - quick reference guide [Infographic]

Content Marketing - quick reference guide [Infographic] | Zorgmarketing, zorgbekostiging, business modellen in de zorg | Scoop.it
In-depth Guide To Content Creation (In-depth Guide To Content Creation http://t.co/maMO1EoDKt)

Via massimo facchinetti, Martin (Marty) Smith
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, January 26, 2014 3:06 AM

Cool helpful infographic.

Laurie J.Greene's curator insight, January 26, 2014 7:44 AM

Nice info!!

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Lancering website patiëntenparticipatie | eHealth Onderzoek & Advies

Lancering website patiëntenparticipatie | eHealth Onderzoek & Advies | Zorgmarketing, zorgbekostiging, business modellen in de zorg | Scoop.it
PGO Support heeft in samenwerking met ZonMw en VSB fonds een website ontwikkeld die informatie geeft over kennis en ervaringen van patiëntenparticipatie bij onderzoek, beleid, en kwaliteit van zorg: Participatiekompas.
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5 tactics for more effective direct-to-patient marketing campaigns

5 tactics for more effective direct-to-patient marketing campaigns | Zorgmarketing, zorgbekostiging, business modellen in de zorg | Scoop.it
Medical device companies must cope with changes to the regulatory environment that require new marketing strategies that go beyond the longtime favorites: physicians and providers. Companies are dealing with more pressure than ever, with demands for increased transparency, more clinical data, lower costs, reimbursement strategies, and more. But the pressure is already on companies to focus on a new stakeholder: the patient. To be successful in today’s new health care economy, you have to do more than sell to the healthcare provider. The product’s value is now dependent on the happiness of the patient.Here’s how you can do it:1. Create personasCreating a campaign without solid personas is like setting sail without a rudder. If you have specific goals you’re trying to accomplish with a direct-to-patient marketing campaign, then you’ll want to get to accomplish them in the most efficient way possible. Personas ensure the right messages are delivered at the right place, at the right time, and to the right people.2. Master the languageHow do patients refer to your product? How do they refer to the product category? How do they describe their symptoms or condition, and what are their attitudes and feelings about it?In order to resonate with patients, you need to be able to speak their language. For example, during our research for Kimberly-Clark Health Care’s I-FLOW* product, a medical device for non-narcotic post-op pain relief, we found that the company was calling it a “Post-Op Pain Relief System” on their website. However, social listening data shined light on other words patients use to describe the product, such as, “pain pump,” “pain ball,” and “pain buster.” If messaging only referred to the product as a pain pump, it might miss a key group of patients who call it a pain ball.3. Account for comfort levelAn important thing for health care marketers to think about for direct-to-patient marketing campaigns is how the patient may feel about the condition(s) they have and the required treatment(s).Trying to encourage users to join a Facebook community of men who also have erectile dysfunction? Asking for people to share their stories about the inability to control bowel movements? Think again. If a topic is particularly sensitive, then patients are unlikely to be willing to share personal stories and may even be hesitant to interact with your content out of fear that they will be associated with the product at all.Does this mean direct to patient marketing campaigns are out? No. It just means that you need to understand the context in which someone would be interested in receiving information, and deliver the right content in a way that can be discreetly consumed. It’s also important to be empathetic when discussing these issues.4. Map out the decision-making processIt’s important to understand how the patient goes about choosing a medical device and what factors influence their choice.In the beginning of a health care decision-making process, the patient is likely to initially turn to the internet. Pew research shows that 72 percent of Internet users say they looked online for health information of one kind or another within the past year.At this stage, there’s an opportunity for medical device companies to provide basic patient education to provide helpful information for the patient. With 8 in 10 online health inquiries starting at a search engine (Pew), companies need to provide content that can be easily found online. This ensures the company is involved in the process from the very beginning.As the patient decision-making process continues, the context may demand different types of content, packaged and delivered in different forms. The key for direct-to-patient marketing campaigns is to understand what the patient needs and how to deliver it to them.5. Scope competitionCompetitive analysis should take place specifically within the context of where patient conversations, decision-making, and learning take place. You need to understand which brands are effectively speaking to patients and who the influencers are.
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Joep Bovendeaard's insight:
Farmacie en marketinglessen uit de states: andere situatie daar maar de patient als uitgangspunt voor communicatiecampagnes nemen is altijd goed
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eHealth Nieuws: Mondriaan kiest voor ehealth

eHealth Nieuws: Mondriaan kiest voor ehealth | Zorgmarketing, zorgbekostiging, business modellen in de zorg | Scoop.it
Instelling voor geestelijke gezondheidszorg Mondriaan gaat een duurzame samenwerking aan met Minddistrict, marktleider in ehealth-oplossingen. Mondriaan sluit zich tegelijkertijd aan bij Minddistricts strategische netwerk ...
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Hoog tijd om voor het netwerk te zorgen - Computable

Hoog tijd om voor het netwerk te zorgen - Computable | Zorgmarketing, zorgbekostiging, business modellen in de zorg | Scoop.it
Hoog tijd om voor het netwerk te zorgen
Computable
Uit onderzoek blijkt dat medische professionals en patiënten in Nederland meer gebruikmaken van eHealth-applicaties dan in andere landen.
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Rescooped by Joep Bovendeaard from Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English)
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How do patient portals improve the coordination of care? | EHRintelligence.com

How do patient portals improve the coordination of care? | EHRintelligence.com | Zorgmarketing, zorgbekostiging, business modellen in de zorg | Scoop.it
Catholic Health Partners CMIO Stephen Beck reveals his organization's approach to bridging the communication gap between providers and patients.

Via Celine Sportisse
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