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Samsung shows the future of flexible displays [Video]

Samsung shows the future of flexible displays [Video] | Zimzala Newswire | Scoop.it

Do you remember the Samsung GALAXY Skin? Now a video has surfaced in which it is shown how Samsung introduces the future of flexible bendable displays.

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Apple Disapproves Sweatshop Game That, Perhaps, Hits A Little Too Close To Home | Techdirt

Apple Disapproves Sweatshop Game That, Perhaps, Hits A Little Too Close To Home | Techdirt | Zimzala Newswire | Scoop.it

Apple considering its iOS app store a way to nanny their customers is nothing new. We've already seen examples such as when they took down a dictionary that included profanity, a scan of the Kama Sutra, and an educational game revolving around the war in Syria. That last example is particularly relevant, as Apple has once again chosen to take down a game that sought to educate the public on how pressure-filled and awful work conditions are in sweatshops abroad.

 

Anyone with any level of understanding that's had the opportunity to play Sweatshop HD knows the defense-style game isn't about glorifying the practice of hiring underage workers to toil away in unsafe conditions to create designer clothes for wealthy foreigners. Instead it's an exploration of the pressure put on people in all aspects of the sweatshop business model. It's about raising awareness, and communicating the sick feeling one gets when seemingly the only way to win is to subject workers to dangerous conditions.

 

And now that educational avenue has been blocked. According to the report, Apple finds something about a game based on sweatshops to be unfit for their customers' iDevices, which is an interesting stance for a company that has been accused of making those same devices in sweatshops themselves. Sweatshops: good enough to build your electronics, but not a fit subject for a game to play on them? Developer Littleloud even attempted to add a disclaimer to the game to clarify that you weren't supposed to think running a sweatshop was fun, but that didn't satisfy Apple.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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