Zero Footprint
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Zero Footprint
We absolutely can reduce the ecological footprint of humanity all the way down to zero!
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Rescooped by Daniel LaLiberte from Cities, urban management and ecosystem services
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This eco-village is designed to be fully self-sufficient, from energy to food to waste

This eco-village is designed to be fully self-sufficient, from energy to food to waste | Zero Footprint | Scoop.it
RegenVillages, which is a spin-off company of Stanford University, is working on a pilot development of 25 homes in Almere, Netherlands, beginning this summer, with the aim of integrating local energy production (using biogas, solar, geothermal, and other modalities), along with intensive food production methods (vertical farming, aquaponics and aeroponics, permaculture, and others) and 'closed-loop' waste-to-resource systems, along with intelligent water and energy management systems. 

"We're really looking at a global scale. We are redefining residential real-estate development by creating these regenerative neighborhoods, looking at first these greenfield pieces of farmland where we can produce more organic food, more clean water, more clean energy, and mitigate more waste than if we just left that land to grow organic food or do permaculture there." - James Ehrlich, CEO of ReGen Villages

Via David Rowing, Alan Yoshioka, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*, Marc Kneepkens, Mário Carmo
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, June 5, 8:17 AM

Getting ready for the #population boom and working with limited #resources.

Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, June 6, 9:57 PM
Intriguing idea that could lead to food and resource self-sufficiency for many areas of the world. Hopefully, this concept will spur our local, state, and federal government to get serious about self-sufficiency.  We should be able to care for ourselves without being dependent on unfriendly governments to supply us with raw materials and fuel.
Rescooped by Daniel LaLiberte from green infographics
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The true cost of water

The true cost of water | Zero Footprint | Scoop.it

The market’s perverse water pricing creates opportunities for businesses that look beyond the market and consider the true cost of H20.

The environmental and social costs of global business water use add up to around $1.9 trillion per year, according to new research.

Some of these external water costs already are being internalized and hitting bottom lines: Just last year, the worst drought in the United States in 50 years sent commodity prices skyrocketing. Companies, especially those in the food, beverage and apparel sectors whose margins and supply chains are tightly linked to agricultural commodities, can use the true cost of water to get ahead of the trend of external costs increasingly being internalized through regulations, pricing or shortages...


Via Lauren Moss
Daniel LaLiberte's insight:

Understanding the true costs of resources, and accounting for these costs, is critical to realistically reaching the goal of Zero Footprint.

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Rescooped by Daniel LaLiberte from The Great Transition
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Scientists vindicate 'Limits to Growth' – urge investment in 'circular economy'

Scientists vindicate 'Limits to Growth' – urge investment in 'circular economy' | Zero Footprint | Scoop.it

The new Club of Rome report (the 33rd) says that:

 

"The phase of mining by humans is a spectacular but very brief episode in the geological history of the planet… The limits to mineral extraction are not limits of quantity; they are limits of energy. Extracting minerals takes energy, and the more dispersed the minerals are, the more energy is needed… Only conventional ores can be profitably mined with the amounts of energy we can produce today."


A fundamental reorganisation of the way societies produce, manage and consume resources could support a new high-technology civilisation, but this would entail a new "circular economy" premised on wide-scale practices of recycling across production and consumption chains, a wholesale shift to renewable energy, application of agro-ecological methods to food production, and with all that, very different types of social structures.


Limits to economic growth, or even "degrowth", the report says, do not need to imply an end to prosperity, but rather require a conscious decision by societies to lower their environmental impacts, reduce wasteful consumption, and increase efficiency – changes which could in fact increase quality of life while lowering inequality.


Via Willy De Backer
Daniel LaLiberte's insight:

Zero Footprint means not just lowering our environmental impact, but eliminating it, and eliminating waste by recycling 100% of the resources we use, powered by 100% renewable energy.

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, June 6, 2014 2:01 AM

Good review of the latest study by Prof. Ugo Bardi for the Club of Rome on how climate change and resource constraints will force us to rethink our way of life.