Zero Footprint
Follow
Find tag "green_energy"
1.4K views | +0 today
Zero Footprint
We absolutely can reduce the ecological footprint of humanity all the way down to zero!
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Daniel LaLiberte from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Microalgae-based biofuel can help to meet world energy demand, researchers say

Microalgae-based biofuel can help to meet world energy demand, researchers say | Zero Footprint | Scoop.it

Microalgae-based biofuel not only has the potential to quench a sizable chunk of the world's energy demands, say Utah State University researchers. It's a potential game-changer.

 

"That's because microalgae produces much higher yields of fuel-producing biomass than other traditional fuel feedstocks and it doesn't compete with food crops," says USU mechanical engineering graduate student Jeff Moody.


Using meteorological data from 4,388 global locations, the team determined the current global productivity potential of microalgae.

 

Algae, he says, yields about 2,500 gallons of biofuel per acre per year. In contrast, soybeans yield approximately 48 gallons; corn about 18 gallons.


"In addition, soybeans and corn require arable land that detracts from food production," Quinn says. "Microalgae can be produced in non-arable areas unsuitable for agriculture."

 

The researchers estimate untillable land in Brazil, Canada, China and the U.S. could be used to produce enough algal biofuel to supplement more than 30 percent of those countries' fuel consumption.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Daniel LaLiberte's insight:

Land that is not used for food can be used to produce algae-based biofuel to meet a large fraction of the world's energy needs.  But another alternative is vertical farming in urban areas, where we can create as much space as we need.  

more...
CCRES's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:45 AM

Microalgae-based biofuel not only has the potential to quench a sizable chunk of the world's energy demands, say Utah State University researchers. It's a potential game-changer.

CCRES ALGAE TEAM

Tekrighter's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:30 AM

Here's a way to produce biofuels that does not compete with food production.

Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, May 30, 2014 2:50 AM

This study highlights the commercial viability of algae biofuels.


The game changing aspect of the technology is that it does not contribute to food insecurity http://sco.lt/5CifIH, a global issue aggravated by climate change http://sco.lt/86HUtl.


However, would we garner enough political will to wrest monopoly from oil and gas companies?

Rescooped by Daniel LaLiberte from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Can We Become A Zero Waste Planet? An Infographic

Can We Become A Zero Waste Planet? An Infographic | Zero Footprint | Scoop.it

Find In-depth Review, Video And Infographic On Global Waste Production. Learn more about statistics of waste/trash in USA, waste statistics worldwide, the high environmental cost of waste, truth about plastics, waste trade and waste reduction.

 

NOTE: The graphic can be scrolled up and down with the mouse.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Daniel LaLiberte's insight:

We MUST become a Zero Waste planet.  We can't afford not to.  There is a lot of waste that we can easily avoid creating, but to make the rest easier, we should focus on scaling up renewable energy, so we will have enough cheap clean energy to help us get to 100% recycling, and clean up all the waste that has been dumped previously.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Daniel LaLiberte from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Wind power could generate all the world's electricity needs without large atmospheric disturbances

Wind power could generate all the world's electricity needs without large atmospheric disturbances | Zero Footprint | Scoop.it

There is enough energy for people to reap from the wind to meet all of the world's power demands without radically altering the planet's climate, according to two independent teams of scientists.

 

Wind power is often touted as environmentally friendly, generating no pollutants. It is an increasingly popular source of renewable energy, with the United States aiming to produce 20 percent of its electricity by wind power by 2030. Still, there have been questions as to how much energy wind power can supply the world, and how green it actually is, given how it pulls energy from the atmosphere.

 

To learn more, climate scientist Katherine Marvel at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in Calif., and her colleagues developed a global climate model that analyzed how wind turbines would drag on the atmosphere to harvest energy from winds at the planet's surface and higher altitudes. Historically, people have built wind turbines on the ground and in the ocean, but research suggests kite-borne turbines could generate more power from steadier, faster high-altitude winds.

 

Adding wind turbines of any kind slows winds, and Marvel and her colleagues found that adding more than a certain amount of turbines would no longer generate more electricity. Still, their simulations suggest that at least 400 terawatts -- or 400 trillion watts of power -- could be generated from surface winds, and more than 1,800 terawatts could be extracted from winds throughout the atmosphere. In comparison, people globally currently use about 18 terawatts of power.

 

Simulating a century's worth of amped-up wind-energy production suggests that harvesting maximum power from these winds would have dramatic long-term effects on the climate, triggering major shifts in atmospheric circulation.

 

In contrast, extracting enough wind energy to satisfy current global power demands would only have minimal climate effects, as long as wind turbines were spread out. Doing so might affect surface temperatures by about 0.1 degree Celsius and affect average precipitation by about 1 percent.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Daniel LaLiberte's insight:

Since the maximum amount of wind energy is over 100 times all of our current energy needs, it is easy to see that enough wind turbines to satisfy our relatively small needs would have minimal impact on the environment. 

 

more...
No comment yet.